Native Prairie

Saskatchewan’s 19th Native Prairie Appreciation Week June 18-24, 2017!

“Everyone can play a role in the conservation of prairie landscapes and a great first step is learning more about them,” Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan’s manager Carolyn Gaudet said. “We are encouraging all Saskatchewan residents to explore and experience what native prairie has to offer.paNOW

“When the adventurers, who first penetrated these wilds, met, in the centre of the forests, immense plains, covered with rich verdure or rank grasses, they naturally gave them the appellation of meadows. As the English succeeded the French, and found a peculiarity of nature, differing from all they had yet seen on the continent, already distinguished by a word that did not express any thing in their own language, they left these natural meadows in possession of their title of convention. In this manner has the word “Prairie” been adopted into the English tongue. ~J. Fenimore Cooper”

“There’s nothing like going out into a patch of native prairie and seeing the birds, the wildlife and the grasses that have been around for a thousand years,” Gaudet said. “The winds blowing through the grasses. The birds chirping.620 CKRM

I’ll pack with care our fragile dawn—

The dawn we laughed to greet;

I’ll send the comfort of the grass

That once caressed your feet.

No yearning love of mine I’ll send

To tear your heart in two—

Just earth-peace—home-peace—still and strong—

These things I’ll send to you.” A Box from Home By Helen Cowles LeCron

Grasses can, and do occupy wide tracts of land and are evenly distributed worldwide. As grasses do not like shade, they are not usually abundant within the forests, however grasses do indeed occur in open spaces, occupying every type of soil, in all kinds of situations and under all climatic conditions. For those living on the prairies, it is evident that grasses are usually successful in occupying large tracts of land to the exclusion of other plants, and yet, though the actual number of individuals of any species of grass, will far out-number those of any species of any other family of flora, they are very difficult to readily distinguish from one another. What an amazing life comes forward when looking at the grass flower through a magnifying lens upon closer investigation. For the prairie grasslands resident, it may indeed be clearly interesting to see where and how grasses vary.

As with flora species, grasses may perhaps fall into categories and be classified as native; annual, biennial or perennial; or introduced invasive, and endangered. Though true Grasses fall into the order Graminaceae (Gramineae) the word grass may signify any old plant of small ribbon-like leaves. With a bit of attention, and observation, it may come about, that the study may elicit those native grasses from agricultural cultivated species or those considered invasive. At this time of year, when the grasses are awash in blossom, is one of the best, quickest, and sure way of capturing the species of grass under observation.

Within the grasslands, are native flowers, starting out in the spring low to the ground as crocus and spring avens with furry coats. As spring evolves to summer, the flowers are higher and higher in stature to peek out over the top of the emerging grassland cover.

Snowberry bushes, trembling aspen, buffaloberry ofttimes line the perimeter of the grasslands affording nesting areas off the ground for species of birds for the avid bird watcher.

The flora may bring along invertebrates, which, themselves are interesting and important. Be they butterflies, pollinator insects such as bees or flies, herbivore or predator insects spiders, grasshoppers, and beetles.

It is with such diversity of species and functions, that an ecosystem is resilient in times of drought, fire, or flood. As Chris Helzer – the prairie ecologist – says the “little things are going to save the world.”

To get involved, look for #NPAW17 on Twitter, and check out weblinks below.

I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all. Richard St. Barbe Baker

2017 NPAW Poster Contest Information Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (Sk PCAP)

Summer Field Tours Native Plant Society of Saskatchewan

Native Prairie Appreciation Week Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (Sk PCAP)

2017 May Prairie Conservation Action Plan Newsletter

Native Prairie Appreciation Week celebrates ‘sea of grass’ paNOW

Native Prairie Checklist Summer 2017 suitable to print out on paper Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (Sk PCAP)

what is Native Prairie? a teacher resource. Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (Sk PCAP)

Native Prairie Appreciation Week – Youth Poster Contest Discover Moose Jaw

Native Prairie Appreciation Week Discover Estevan.

Native Prairie Grassland highlighted this week in Saskatchewan 620 CKRM

2017 Native Prairie Appreciation Week Saskatchewan Forage Council June 22. 2017

Saskatchewan Proclaims 19th Annual Native Prairie Appreciation Week Government of Saskatchewan June 12, 2017

It is precisely what is invisible in the land… that makes what is merely empty space to one person, a place to another. Barry Lopez.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority as the MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)” .

 

“By simplifying our lives, we rediscover our child-like stalk of innocents that reconnects us with the central resin of our innate humanity that knows truth and goodness. To see the world through a lens of youthful rapture is to see life for what it can be and to see for ourselves what we wish to become. In this beam of newly discovered ecstasy for life, we realize the splendor of love, life, and the unbounded beauty of the natural world.”
― Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

Must See Event.

“Two things never mix: one is enchantments and the other is meddling with them.”
― Lloyd Alexander

10:24 PM on Tuesday, June 20, 2017.

Sorry there is not more notice for this event!

“Bluebells are coming,” sing the Imp and the Elf, and so they are, and with the blue-bells comes Summer.” Arthur Ransome

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Spring with its yellow Buffalo Bean, the pale aspen wearing their new bright green dresses. For now it is summer and the whole forest will be green. For in summer, the prairie clover reaches high above the flowering grasses. Summer is prime to sight the Sharp-tailed Grouse, and Ruddy Duck, Pied-billed Grebe, and American White Pelican. ill you, this summer spy a Kildeer, Black Tern or Mourning Dove? Downy Woodpecker, and Northern Flicker visit all year long, yet the Least Flycatcher, Warbling Vireo, Western and Eastern Kingbird will only appear for the summer months.

“You may say you won’t interfere with another person’s soul, but you do—merely by existing. The snag about it is the practical difficulty, so to speak, of not existing.”
― Dorothy L. Sayers

July brings the bright rays of the Gaillardia, a striking contrast to the delicate flowers of the Northern Bedstraw. Harebell alongside Slender Beard-Tongue adds a hint of blue and lavender to the prairie biome. The Silver-leaf Psorlea tall and elegant, leaves a dash of blue like a hint of spice, The Purple Prairie Clover begins its dance with whorls of colour starting at the base of its dress, blooming ever higher. The Western snowberry shows off with its amazing pinkish white bells. Keep your eyes peeled for the Skeleton Weed, Hairy Golden-aster and White Cinquefoil painting the grasslands with delicate bursts of colour for those sauntering through the open prairie.

“Two things never mix: one is enchantments and the other is meddling with them.”
― Lloyd Alexander

Tell us what Summer is like for you.

What are the things we know summer by? Perchance summer dresses, and tailored shorts, toques give way to summer hats. Finding a cool, comfortable place, and do tell of those things which make the forest prairie so delightful.

The holes are full of rabbits, and the summer grass grows high. You know thistles and dandelions, of course, but I wonder if you know the wild orchid when you see one? What will you do these long summer evenings? The scenery is peaceful, foliage of the groves and forests verdant, and rich beyond compare. Have you tasted summer? Warm, mellow summer with glowing sunbeams to make every nerve tingle. Have you made acquaintance with the little bird which flits around the branches of the shrubbery? This little brown job flits in and around the branches of the buffaloberry and snowberry bushes. Playing and dancing on the wind in a frisky way, sure to attract attention, then behind a leaf and it is gone.

” Every morning, arising from the death of sleep, the happy plants and all our fellow animal creatures great and small, and even the rocks, seemed to be shouting, “Awake, awake, rejoice, rejoice, come love us and join in our song. Come! Come!” John Muir.

Summer solstice 10:24 PM on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 come out and savour the first moment of summer.

“Never stand in the way of letting God use people’s actions, in order to solve a greater issue in the world.”
― Shannon L. Alder

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority as the MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)” .

“Justice means minding one’s own business and not meddling with other men’s concerns.” Plato

Meddling is what we do. It’s what defines us. ”
― Alastair Reynolds

A Spring Reprieve

A Spring Reprieve

“The aim of the Men of the Trees is briefly ‘ to develop a tree sense in every citizen, and to encourage all to plant, protect and love their native trees; for forestry is among the oldest and most honourable of the peaceful arts of men, and in its practice is unselfish and constructive service.’ ”
In the words of Henry van Dyke, America’s greatest tree poet,
He that planteth a tree is a servant of God;
He provideth a kindness for many generations
And faces that he hath not seen shall bless him.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

On this day, National Heat Awareness Day which arrives on the last Friday of May, we may celebrate the arrival of Spring. The American Robin, Western Meadowlark, and Buffalo Bean have all arrived. According to tradition, when the bright yellow blooms of the Buffalo Bloom flower arrived along the ground, it was time for the First Nations of history to pack up their winter camp, to follow the migrating buffalo herd. The Buffalo Bean blooms are nearing the end of their season for their yellow blossoms amid the songs of the Robin and Meadowlark.

“Yesterday was the happiest day of my life. Every new day that follows the previous day is happier and what better than this I can wish for my friend…
“I wish you health and strength of an oak, the long life of a redwood.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Imagine A Fish Without Water. Can It Survive?
Now Imagine A World Without Trees. Can Men Survive?

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

“You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover.
Richard St. Barbe Baker”

Saskatoon Nature Society Field Trip

We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations”. – Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”~Margaret Mead

The Saskatoon Nature Society Past-President, Marten Stoffel, who is familiar with the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area, along with Sara Byrson who has a background in forestry will lead a field trip to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area on the evening of June 14, as follows. For several years Marten Stoffel has been banding birds at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Wednesday June 14, 2017
7:00 pm – 9:00 pmRichard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.
“We will walk through this afforestation area next to
Chappell Marsh to search for native plants and songbirds.
Meet by the Grain Elevator at the Western Development
Museum parking lot on Lorne Avenue. Bus: Route 1
Exhibition departs downtown terminal at 6:31 p.m. and
arrives on Lorne Avenue adjacent to museum about 6:50 p.m.
Leaders Sara Bryson (306 261 6156) and Marten Stoffel
(306 230 9291)

Guide to Nature Viewing Sites Page 122.”

Everyone is welcome to participate in any Saskatoon Nature Society field trip. Bring your friends. Carpooling for out-of- town trips is arranged at the meeting place; there is no charge other than to share gasoline costs. Phone the trip leader if you have any questions (as above). Participants are free to depart early if they wish. Saskatoon Nature Society Members with FRS radios should bring them on out of town trips. Family Radio Service (FRS) is an improved walkie-talkie radio system. Check the website at Saskatoon Nature Society for last minute changes or cancellations and to download checklists. Bus Information: 306-975-3100.

Many of the  Saskatoon Nature Society trip destinations are described in the 3rd edition of “A Guide to Nature Viewing Sites in and around Saskatoon” available from Saskatoon Nature Society Books.

Typically, at least the bird species are recorded on the Saskatoon Nature Society checklist but there are some ways that the Saskatoon Nature Society can electronically record our observations too.

It is with grateful appreciation that the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area acknowledge this wonderful program acknowledging the semi-wilderness wildlife habitat of the West Swale, and associated woodlands. Though this two hour walk through will not be as extensive as a two day bio-blitz, it will be intriguing to discover what native plants are discovered at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and which song bird species come to roost for the evening.

As Saskatchewan Tourism says; “With over 350 species to be observed, birdwatching in Saskatchewan is a year-round activity. However, the fall and spring migration seasons present fantastic opportunities for viewing as species both rare and plentiful cross the Land of Living Skies.”

The Prairie Birder, Charlotte Wasylik, has listed the arrival dates for spring migratory birds in Alberta, to check how these dates correspond to Saskatchewan Species, compare to E-Bird historic sightings. The prairie provinces are vast land areas, and she mentions, that “with a variety of habitats and species arrival dates will vary based on your location in the province”, the typical dates of spring migration are March through May.

What are some of Saskatchewan’s prairie songbirds? Sibley and Alquist divided songbirds into two “parvorders”, Corvida and Passerida which include shrikes, vireos, crows, magpies, jays, waxwings, chickadees, larks, swallows, martins, warblers, wrens, nuthatches, thrushes, true sparrows, finches, pipits, buntings, American sparrows, longspurs, buntings for example. Will it be possible from the above family listing to perhaps sight any of the species of these families on the Saskatoon Nature Society Check List which may offer a spotting of the following example species; Sprague’s pipit, Chestnut-collared longspur, Western Meadowlark, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Brown Thrasher, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, McCown’s Longspur, Bobolink, and Purple Martin.

“Grassland songbirds evolved with specific needs that restrict where and how they can obtain food and build nests. Most of them can only nest in certain types of grass and will not tolerate trees in the landscape….The Baird’s Sparrow is one of the least flexible grassland songbirds…they’re really fussy about how tall and sparse the vegetation is. They have to have finely stemmed grasses to nest in. So the heavy, thick stems and leaf blades of invasive and non-natives like smooth brome are a problem for them.Hanson

The former natural area screening study conducted surveys in native grassland, modified grasslands and wetlands plant communities throughout the west/southwest sector of Saskatoon. Locating native grassland communities in and around trembling aspen bluffs. Mixed grasslands, however will show examples of smooth brome, alfalfa, and sweet clover. “Grasslands have undergone habitat conversion including cultivation, grazing, suburbanization, and industrialization. Murphy A listing of native plant species is included at the end of this article or click here [pdf].

The south west sector afforestation areas were started as tree nurseries in 1972, and when the trees matured, this use as a tree nursery is not longer viable. So the grasslands have had years to recover, and begin the conversion back to their natural state. However, “in addition to the threat of development, native grasslands are being degraded due to weed invasionWilliams.  So it will be intriguing to see the level of native plants left intact at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Looking back now, to the afforestation methods employed in 1972, “The following tree species were used: American and Siberian Elm, Manitoba Maple, Green Ash, Poplar, Willow, Colorado Spruce, Scotch Pine, and Caragana. Rows weaving in and out as much as forty feet from the centre line was used. This produces a natural forest effect. The proposed planting area consisted of four and one-half adjacent quarter sections. We divided this two and one-half mile long area into five planting areas, with strips of fifty to sixty feet left bare, as fire guards between each planting area.”Ligtermoet So these means that there are areas which have been native prarie biome for 57 years since the land was purchased by the City of Saskatoon in 1960 without development of any form at all, so it may, indeed be promising to find belts of native grassland, and associated songbirds during this Saskatoon Nature Society nature field trip.

Whereas the West Swale has numerous small scattered wetland areas, the focus of this nature study walk, will be not the aquatic vegetation, nor waterfowl, but the belts of native plants, and any associated songbirds.

Louie Schwartzberg states that “Nature’s beauty is a gift that cultivates appreciation and gratitude.” Thank you to the Saskatoon Nature Society to help all the field trip participants become aware of nature’s beauty which abounds at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Your planning of this nature field trip on June 14, 2017 is gratefully appreciated! Words cannot express our feelings, nor the thanks for all your help.

“It really boils down to this: that all life is interrelated. We are all caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied into a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one destiny, affects all indirectly”~Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Native Grassland Plants, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Native Grassland Plants, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

BIBLIOGRAPHY and FURTHER INFORMATION:
A Land Manager’s guide to Grassland Birds of Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan Watershed Authority.

Are the Prairies getting quieter? Songbirds are declining in number. Audio extra: Can you identify some Prairie birds by their songs? CBC News. May 22, 2015.

Clarke, Jared B. Bird Banding in Saskatchewan
Birds Protected in Canada Under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 Environment and Climate Change Canada. Nature. Government of Canada.

Hanson, Kim. Fire is for the Birds in Northern Mixed-Grass Prairie. Fire Science. he information for this Manager’s Viewpoint is based on JFSP Project 01-3-2-09, Prescribed Fire for Fuel Reduction in Northern Mixed-Grass Prairie: Influence on Habitat and Populations of Indigenous Wildlife and Future Forest Flammability; Principal Investigators: Robert K. Murphy, Todd A. Grant, and Elizabeth M. Madden.

Wild Birds Unlimited of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Facebook.
Bird ID skills: How to Learn Bird Songs and Calls All About Birds. Cornell University. April 20, 2009

Best Beautiful Bird Songs – Saskatoon Saskatchewan You Tube.

City of Saskatoon West/Southwest Sector Natural Area Screening Study. Report 12-1361-0028. Golder Associates. September 2012

Davis, S.K., D.C. Duncan, and M. Skeel. Distribution and Habitat Associations of Three Endemic Grassland Songbirds in Southern Saskatchewan. The Wilson Bulletin
Vol. 111, No. 3 (Sep., 1999), pp. 389-396 Published by: Wilson Ornithological Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4164104 Page Count: 8
Davis, Stephen K. Nesting Ecology of Mixed-Grass Prairie Songbirds in Southern Saskatchewan. The Wilson Bulletin Vol. 115, No. 2 (Jun., 2003), pp. 119-130 Wilson Ornithological Society Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4164538 Page Count: 12

Ligtermoet, A.L. Assistant Parks Superintendent City of Saskatoon. Afforestation – Man Made Forest on the Prairies. January 4, 1974.

Ludlow, Sarah M., R. Mark Brigham, and Stephen K. Davis. Nesting Ecology of Grassland Songbirds, Effects of Predation, Parasitism and Weather. The Wilson Jornail of Ornithology 126(4):686-699, 2014

Herriot, Trevor. Mapping our birds – the Saskatchewan Breeding Bird Atlas kicks off in 2017 Feb. 2, 2017

Higgs, Matt. Songbirds in decline across Canada. Greenup Column. Peterborough Examiner.

Kishkinev. Dmitry, et al Experienced migratory songbirds do not display goal-ward orientation after release following a cross-continental displacement: an automated telemetry study Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 37326 (2016)
doi:10.1038/srep37326

Martinez, Victoria. Student, ranchers protect prairie songbirds. Allison Henderson. Allison Henderson SCOTT Bell/university of Saskatchewan U of S graduate student Allison Henderson is studying connections between prairie grasslands and songbirds. University of Saskatchewan. Native Plant Society of Saskatchewan.
Murphy, Dennis D. and Pual R. Ehrlich. Conservation Biology of California’s Remnant Native Grasslands.

Robinson, Ashley. Grassland birds in Saskatchewan under threat: reort. Regina Leader Post.

Rose, Phil. Native Rangelands: A Last Refuge for Grassland Songbirds University of Regina.


Songbird Documentary on CBC Nature of Things. The MessengerDoc.com.

Species Detection Survey Protocols. Grassland Birds Surveys. Fish and Wildlife Branch Technical Report No. 201 4-9.0 December 2014. Government of Saskatchewan.
Tremont, Anna Marie. Canada’s grasslands most endangered least protected ecosystems. CNC. February 21, 2017

U of S Research takes flight in songbird SOS documentary. The Sheaf. University of Saskatchewan.

Wildlife 911: Baby Birds on Ground. Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Saskatchewan

Williams, Nicholas S.G., Mark I. McDonnell, Emma J. Seager. Factors influencing the loss of an endangered ecosystem in an urbanising landscape: a case study of native grasslands from Melbourne, Australia Landscape and Urban Planning 71 (2005) 35–49 April 9, 2003.
What are Native Prairie Grasslands Worth? Why it pays to Conserve this Endangered Ecosystem. Ranchers Stewardship Alliance Inc. Chris Nykoluk Consulting. 2013

Wolsfield, MIke. Ecoregions in Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan EcoNetwork

“We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations”. – Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“Healing the broken bond between children and nature may seem to be an overwhelming, even impossible task. But we must hold the conviction that the direction of this trend can be changed, or at least slowed. The alternative to holding and acting on that belief is unthinkable for human health and for the natural environment. The environmental attachment theory is a good guiding principle: attachment to land is good for child and land.” `Richard Louv

For more information:
You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

It is not a farce.…”To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.” ~Terry Tempest Williams

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Canadian Tire, Thank you!

As we come up to UN World Environment Day on June 5, it is with great appreciation and gratitude that Canadian Tire, Confederation Branch has lent a helping hand. Though we had close to 80 volunteers at the “Clean Green Community Scene” for the July 9, 2016 clean up, and 86 tires were found, removed and recycled.  The clean up was held in the summer when the grass was deep and there were a few additional tires thrown away in the bush were missed. The actions of Canadian Tire are very much appreciated in accepting those tires with rims discarded illegally in the bush, so that a beautiful and healthy forest and wildlife habitat corridor can be enjoyed now, and can be passed on to future generations. It is actions such as these, that do, indeed change the world.

When scrap tires are thrown away in the bush, they pose a real threat to the environment and to human health. Tires, left in the elements collect water. The standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Piles of tires can harbour rats and vermin. Accidental grass fires, which catch onto tires, are very difficult to extinguish as tires, themselves are a fuel source. If tires do catch fire they produce toxins and carcinogens such as benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, butadiene, styrene, dioxins, and furans as well as heavy smoke. A combustible tire also increases the threat of a grass fire escalating into a forest fire. If this wasn’t bad enough, scrap tires also post environmental concerns as the rubber decomposes, polluting the water, air and soil. Tires contain oils, heavy metals and lead which leech into the soil and into the ground water. The marshlands, and wetlands of the West Swale are impacted, as are any animals which may imbibe of the polluted water. Now then, not only for these reasons, but who looks at a magnificent forest and says of the scenic beauty, that a tire would be visually appealing in this green landscape?

So, the legacy pollution, of unknown folks who dumped the scrap tires illegally in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has been remedied and alleviated by the Canadian Tire Automotive Department. This is truly and gratefully appreciated by the many and several environmental, recreational and community groups who are involved with the care and stewardship of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. When tires are taken in for recycling, they may be re-purposed as insulation blocks, drainage aggregate, playground surfacing, rubber modified asphalt, floor and truck mats, belts, gaskets, soles for shoes, rubber washers or garden edging.

The next time you are at Canadian Tire Confederation, thank this leading business for standing beside the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. When voices such as Canadian Tire take stand for the environment, it truly does have far-reaching ripple effects. Protecting our environment, human health and the community is a wonderful support, and we have no qualms saying that we are truly grateful to Canadian Tire for your assistance in helping to recycle these tires, and care for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and its semi-wilderness wildlife habitat.

Canadian Tire
Located in: Confederation Mall
Address: 300 Confederation Dr #1, Saskatoon, SK S7L 4R6
Phone: (306) 384-1212
Province: Saskatchewan

Help us tell Canadian Tire how they did today! It was phenomenal!!!

We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations. – Richard St. Barbe Baker.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Bloch, Michael. Tires, recycling and our planet. Green Living Tips. March 17, 2013

Bylaw No. 5713. the “Anti-Dumping Bylaw.”
Bylaw No. 8310 The Waste Bylaw The City of Saskatoon. 2004. Codified to Bylaw No. 9410 Dec. 12, 2016

Keeping your neighbourhood clean What you need to know. The Waste Bylaw no 8310. City of Saskatoon Residential Bylaw brochure.

Tire recycling. Wikipedia.

For more information:

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

For more information on keeping Saskatoon green, you may call the City of Saskatoon “Solid Waste Information Line” (306) 975-2486. If you think there is a problem with waste in the city, please also call the City of Saskatoon Trash Tips hot line at (306) 975-2486.

Any person who dumps or disposes of Waste contrary to Bylaw 5713, “The Waste Dumping” bylaw is liable to a fine of not less than $100.00, nor more than $500.00. Additionally, the person charged is responsible for the removal of the waste dumped improperly.

“You can come across a precipice not only in the mountains but in everywhere! ….When you come across a precipice, look for the bridge; it is somewhere there!” ― Mehmet Murat ildan In this case, the bridge for the precipice at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, in recycling tires, came in the form of Canadian Tire, providing a bridge to recycle the tires safely protecting the environment. Thank you!

Afforestation Workshop

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Afforestation Workshop May 25, 2017 at 1:30
Afforestation Workshop May 25, 2017 at 1:30

“What do the forests bear? Soil, water and pure air–soil, water and pure air are the basis of life; this is the slogan of the Chipko (Hug to the Trees) women in India–those who work with Sunderlal Bahuguna to save the forests of the Himalayas. Sunderlal is my Guru”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

The Wild About Saskatoon 2017 NatureCity Festival theme this year is ‘We are water: explore our prairie waterscape.’ The festival takes place with a wide assortment of events May 23-28, 2017. The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area joins the festivities Thursday afternoon May 25, 2017 between 1:30 and 3:15.  Situated in a low lying area classified as a “wetlands”, the afforestation workshop  participants will be immersed in the forest and woodlands in the southwest sector of Saskatoon.  The workshop was compiled from the books and teachings of Dr. Richard St. Barbe Baker,  L.L.D., O.B.E., humanitarian, author, silviculturist and forester.  In this way we embrace the teachings of this Baba Wya Miti ~ loving Father of Trees.

Omitakoyasin. The Omitakoyasin are the spirits of all of humanity’s ancestors, since always and for always. “We are all related.” It is important to realize that every single person who enters into our lives, from the passing stranger to those nearest and dearest to us, is present because we dreamed them here. We made a mutual agreement with each of them to connect in this time and space for the purpose of enriching and empowering our individual and collective evolution.~Lynette Hopkin

Arrive at the parking lot of the South West off leash dog park for 1:30 p.m. on Thursday May 25, 2017 should you wish to partake in this workshop activities.  Directions and map are included below.  Though the meeting place will be the SW off leash recreation area parking lot, the Afforestation Workshop will take place in the forest east of the dog park, and not in the dog park itself.

“The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Note 

There will be no actual planting or “afforestation of trees” at the location of this workshop, this afforestation workshop is so named as it takes place within an “afforestation area” – the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

For more information:

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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Shinrin-yoku Forest Bathing

World Healing Day

This World Healing Day, April 29, try Shinrin-yoku Forest Bathing, it is an amazing health activity.  Immerse yourself in the sights and sounds of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, lay your hands on your favourite tree.  Pass the word on, and invite the world to experience; Shinrin-yoku Forest Bathing

We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Forest-bathing describes the practice of taking a short, leisurely visit to a forest for health benefits. The practice originated in Japan where it is called shinrin-yoku. A forest bathing trip involves visiting a forest for relaxation and recreation while breathing in volatile substances, called phytoncides (wood essential oils), which are antimicrobial volatile organic compounds derived from trees, such as α-Pinene and limonene. Incorporating forest bathing trips into a good lifestyle was first proposed in 1982 by the Forest Agency of Japan. It has now become a recognized relaxation and/or stress management activity in Japan. According to Cassandra Szlaraski, ” the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku,  translates to “taking in the forest atmosphere.””

“Soon I was completely isolated in the luxuriant, tangled growth of ferns which were well above my head. In my infant mind I seemed to have entered a fairyland of my dreams.

“I wandered on as in a dream, all sense of time and space lost …

“I became intoxicated with the beauty all around me, immersed in the joyousness and exultation of feeling part of it all.

“I had entered the temple of the wood. I sank to the ground in a state of ecstasy; everything was intensely vivid – the call of a distant cuckoo seemed just for me …

“The overpowering beauty of it all entered my very being.

“At that moment my heart brimmed over with a sense of unspeakable thankfulness which has followed me through the years since that woodland re-birth …~Richard St. BarbeBaker.

“I was in love with life: I was indeed born again, although I could not have explained what had happened to me then.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker My Life My Trees

“In Japan and Korea, forest therapy modalities are integrated into their medical system and are covered by insurance,” said Ben Page, a certified forest therapy guide who founded Shinrin Yoku Los Angeles. ” Meeri Kim, also notes that “phytoncides, which are antimicrobial organic compounds given off by plants. They argue that by breathing in the volatile substances released by the forest, people achieve relaxation… Phytoncides —are  colloquially known in forest bathing circles as “the aroma of the forest.” Quing Li, senior Assistant Professor at Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, figures that the increase in people’s natural killer (NK) cells increase due to the Phytoncides which are the essential oils from trees. α-pinene and limonene are examples of tree “perfumes” which are antimicrobial volatile organic compounds.

“For years, I’ve charged my batteries on trees.  You have to select a special tree friend.  When I came out of hospital after a serious operation, I chose a Cedar of Lebanon.  Cedar itself comes from the Arabic word meaning strength.”

“I used to do two minutes on and two minutes off, then two minutes again.  After about four minutes, your hands begin to tingle.  I wouldn’t recommend to a beginner to take more than a minute to start with.”  ~Richard St. Barbe Baker speaks of laying the palm of hands on a tree trunk.

And just as Richard St. Barbe Baker attests, so, to does Dr. Li, lay your hands on the trees, touch the trees, and open yourself to the healing. The experience is enhanced, if one absorbs the sights, sounds, colours through all the five senses as one walks slowly and meditatively through the forest. An excellent day spent forest bathing would be to wander for about four hours while walking about 5 kilometers through the woods. Forest bathing can also be done for half this time, strolling 2.5 kilometers over 2.5 hours.

It is not so much for its beauty that the forest makes a claim upon men’s hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air, that emanation from old trees, that so wonderfully changes and renews a weary spirit.
—Robert Louis Stevenson

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

 

Forest Bathing Wikipedia

Healthy Parks Healthy People Central. Forest Bathing

Kim, Meeri. ‘‘Forest bathing’ is latest fitness trend to hit U.S. — ‘Where yoga was 30 years ago’ Washington Post.

Li, Quing. Effect of Forest Bathing trips on Human Immune Systems. Environ Health. 2010 Jan. 15 (1) 9-17. Published online 2009 Mar 25 doi 10.1007/s12199-008-0058-3

Shinrin Yoku

Szlarski, Cassandra What is Forest Bathing? Global News.

What is World Healing Day About World Healing Day A Global Health and Healing Event.

World healing day Facebook

World Healing Day

Your Brain on Nature: Forest Bathing and Reduced Stress. Mother Earth News.

“A forest is a perfect example of the law of return in action. Trees give back to the earth more than they take, while building up humus, and enriching the soil by the minerals that have been carried up to the leaves in the rising sap. By nature man is
a forest dweller. He was cradled in the tropics. His food was the fruit of the trees. He possessed the secret of adaptation to his environment, so that health, gentleness, beauty and strength were enjoyed to the full. In his forest setting man was conscious of his relationship to God and of his unity with all living things.`Richard St. Barbe Baker
For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker
Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Let TAWAMHWE-pull together-be our motto and I pray that we may give our active support to all efforts of desert reclamation by tree planting and I pray that I may be just to the Earth below my feet, to my neighbour by my side and to the light which comes from above and within, and this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy for my having lived in it.~Richard St. Barbe Baker