EcoFriendly Sask Thank you

EcoFriendly Sask

The Stewards and Stakeholders truly appreciate your thoughtful contribution towards signs at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Through your donation, we will be able to accomplish our goal to take the necessary steps to establish interpretive signs to create knowledge and understanding of the greenspace at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. You truly make a great difference to supporting the environment, and for this we are truly grateful!

Your generosity will directly benefit the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area greenspace and the visitors from Saskatoon and area.   Thank you for supporting this worthwhile mission to enhance and protect the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area with place based knowledge.

The Stewards and Stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area have met with the Meewasin Valley Authority, and with the City of Saskatoon to set a plan and procedure into place.

Additionally, we are in the process of reaching out to schools, teachers and classrooms in order to involve students in the process of creating interpretive signs to provide education and awareness of the significance of the afforestation area, of Richard St. Barbe Baker the first global conservationist, to impart important conservation messages,  alongside natural and historical interpretation of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

EcoFriendly Sask, your support of this local environment project is truly invaluable.

Thanks again from the Stewards and Stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Eco-Friendly Sask. CA Sponsor Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Clean Up 2016 Saskatoon, SK CA
Eco-Friendly Sask. CA Sponsor Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Signs  2019

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

History of Afforestation

Saskatchewan archives week is February 4-10, 2018. 

The afforestation areas are wetlands, woodlands, green spaces, how does Saskatchewan archives week fit in with an afforestation area?

 


Images of St. Barbe, credit
University of Saskatchewan,
University Archives & Special Collections,
Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

The Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds are held at the University Archives & Special Collections.  Encompassing boxes and boxes of letters, correspondence, books written by Richard St. Barbe Baker, photographs, it is a treasure trove of documents, history, biography, and lifestyle of the internationally renown silviculturist, St. Barbe.

The city of Saskatoon archivist, Jeffery O’Brien, was invaluable in tracing Richard St. Barbe Baker’s family tree, and finding information about James Scott St Barbe Baker employed at the Engineering Department, City of Saskatoon.

Additionally City archives also found the history of the afforestation tree planting, and naming documentation of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Urban Regional Park, and ‘George Genereux’ urban regional park.

  1. The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has as its namesake, Dr. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., Hon. LL.D. (Sask), F.I.A.L., For.Dip.Cantab., A.C.F. (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) silviculturist, environmental activist, humanitarian and author who founded the International Tree Foundation and Children of the Green Earth.
  2. Whereas ‘George Genereux” urban regional park honours George Patrick Genereux, B.A., MD, CM (March 1, 1935 – April 10, 1989) was a 1952 Summer Olympics Canadian Gold medal-winning trap shooter, recipient of the Lou Marsh Trophy and the Viscount Alexander Trophy, inducted into the Canada, and Saskatchewan and Saskatoon’s Sports Hall of Fame and physician.

Two book manuscripts of Richard St. Barbe Baker and photographs are housed at the University of Regina Dr. John Archer Library.

In the Saskatoon Public Library local history room is the history of the Meewasin Valley Authority formation, and their inaugural management of the afforestation areas.

The local history room staff also knew about Bert Wellman, and Bill Graham, and how they were ecological pioneers starting a green belt around Saskatoon in 1960.  One of the library staff having partaken in the writing of Saskatoon: A History of Photographs by O’Brien, Ruth W. Millar, William P. Delainey . Edition illustrated.  Publisher Coteau Books, 2007.  ISBN 1550503669, 9781550503661.  This book was familiar with Saskatoon’s amazing pioneers who envisioned a green city.

The Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan is home to the homestead application documents of Richard St. Barbe Baker, and his brother, James Scott St. Barbe Baker.

In searching for a pre-1930 land record, it is revealed that Richard St. Barbe Baker applied for the NW quarter section 25 township 34 range 6 west of the third meridian , and James Scott, his brother was on the SW quarter of section 36 township 34 range 6 west of the third meridian.  These homesteads were near the Beaver Creek Conservation Area in the Rural Municipality of Dundurn 314 near the current ‘Baker Road.’

In this way, the history of the Afforestation areas, are, in fact, housed in the various archives of Saskatoon.  The heritage festival of Saskatoon From Many Peoples Strength, Celebrating Diversity, is indeed, a fantastic way to celebrate the history of the afforestation area.

Saskatoon led the way in 1972, as 660 acres of afforestation are definitely pioneers in afforestation and the city residents have reaped a great value from the planting trees for carbon sequestration.

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s Creation, this beautiful Earth. The ancients believe that the Earth was a sentient being and felt the behavior of mankind upon it. As we have no proof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible people to accept this point of view and behave accordingly.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'”
Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

1884 Sectional Map

“I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay, small acts of kindness and love.”~ Gandalf

Department of the Interior Topographical surveys branch. Sectional Maps. Dominion Land Office April 25, 1884. Township 36 Range 6 West of the Third Meridian
Plan of Township No 36 Range 6 West of the Third Meridian. Dominion Land Office April 25, 1884.

Map Surveyed by the undersigned Frank L. Blake D.L.S. August 1883
Approved and confirmed E Deville for the Surveyor General

A map expresses a perspective {that of the cartographer}. But the map itself has not a perspective. As George Graham says, “the perspective is not in the map. It must be read into the map. The mind’s Intentionality or aboutness in underived. It inheres in it or is intrinsic to it.” He looked deeply forlorn needing to settle this  decision once and for all.

The wetlands which formed in the Pleistocene Yorath Island Spillway are very evident on the above map, and are part of what is now called the “West Swale” The West Swale extends from Yorath Island in the South Saskatchewan River through to Grandora, Rice Lake and the North Saskatchewan River [To get an overview of the West Swale check out the next Map 1915 Saskatoon Sheet which includes Grandora, etc…

“Humankind’s greatest sin is anthropocentrism – where human life is valued above all other sentient life. Msirtnecoporhtna – backwards or forwards it makes no sense. If Moses could spell it, he would have put in his top 10.” Philip Wollen founder of Winsome Kindness Trust

Blairmore Sector Afforestation Areas

Legend Additions in the colour Mauve:

How would the Blairmore Sector Afforestation Areas have featured on a map of 1883?

On the west side of Saskatoon a portion of the 660 acres preserved in perpetuity in 1972 are located at:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (City of Saskatoon Urban Regional Park) Parts Section 22 and SW 23 township 36 range 6 west of the third meridian. (East of the CN overpass on SK Highway 7) SE 22 & SW 23-36-6 W3
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of South West Off Leash Recreation Area) civic address 467 Township Road 362-A.  Only lands of SE 22 36 6 W3 under MVA conservation management
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) civic address 355 Township Road 362-A under MVA conservation
Un-named City of Saskatoon Afforestation Area. Part south of CN Chappell yards SE section 23-36-6-W3 preserved as afforestation area in perpetuity, under MVA conservation management- west of SW OLRA and east of COC.
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area civic address 241 Township Road 362-A
In 1960, part of NE 21-36-6 W3 (West of the CN overpass on SK Highway 7) was purchased by the City, planted in 1972, preserved as an afforestation area. Named in 1978-1979 George Genereux Park (Urban Regional Park), this namesake was removed at this afforestation area for use at a different city pocket park.
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area civic address 133 Range Road 3063

“Each person walks a journey unique to himself or herself. Live your own journey and run your own race.”  Winsome Campbell-Green

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Act. Don’t react. See a need, fix it first. Worry about the details later. If you wait until you are asked you have just missed a golden opportunity. They are fleeting and rare.” Philip Wollen founder of Winsome Kindness Trust

The Elm, Majestic and Stately

Elm Trees_CC-BY-SA-2.0 BriYYZ
American Elm Trees Ulmus Americana Photo credit BriYYZ CC-BY-SA-2.0

Remembering the Elm Tree

“The great elms murmur in low, inarticulate tones, and the shadows at their feet hide themselves from the moon, moving noiselessly through all the summer night. The woods in the distance stand motionless in the wealth of their massed foliage, keeping guard over the unbroken silence that reigns in all their branching aisles. Beyond the far-spreading waters lie white and dreamlike, and tempt the thought to the fairylands that sleep just beyond the line of the horizon. A sweet and restful mystery, like a bridal veil, hides the face of Nature, and he only can venture to lift it who has won the privilege by long and faithful devotion.”~Hamilton Wright Mabie

 

Siberian Elm Fruit Seed Ulmus pumila samaras Photo credit Luis Fernández García L. Fdez. cc-by-sa-2.1 Ulmus-pumila-samaras
Siberian Elm Fruit Seed Ulmus pumila samaras Photo credit Luis Fernández García L. Fdez. cc-by-sa-2.1 Ulmus-pumila-samaras

“Down through the maple avenue you will take your pleasant route, past the willow and alder clumps, and the ancient mill, that hangs its idle arms listlessly by its sides—on and on, over the little style, and the rustic bridge, which spans the rivulet, until you reach the giant elm that spreads its broad branches far and wide. Books and work are scattered about on the verdant turf, bright flowers peep forth from amid the green, and many a fair face greets you with its frank and cordial welcome. The sky is very blue and clear, and the summer’s breath comes refreshingly to you through the leafy screen, as you seat yourself upon a mossy stone and join in the merriments of the happy circle gathered there.” ~ F. Irene Burge Smith

American Elm Ulmus Americana autumn leaf
American Elm Ulmus Americana autumn leaf

“The hours in which we come in contact with great souls are always memorable in our history, often the crises in our intellectual life; it is the recollection of such hours that gives those bending elms an imperishable charm, and lends to this landscape a deathless interest.”~ F. Irene Burge Smith

“Love needs new leaves every summer of life, as much as your elm-tree, and new branches to grow broader and wider, and new flowers to cover the ground.”
Harriet Beecher Stowe

June_7787

“It was the summer time, and he remembers that the old elm under which he sat was just in the fullness and glory of its foliage; the hour, too, is distinctly in his memory; the dreary and sad twilight, and the breeze’s soft play over the waving grass, and the hum of the insects, and the murmur of the city’s noise that came pleasantly from the distance, like the moving of far-off waters. Oh! these things can never die out of his remembrance. How can they! Doesn’t he cherish them religiously, coming always at the vesper time to the same spot to live them over and over again?

Even through the dreary winters he but closes his eyes and the verdure is there, and the beauty.”~ F. Irene Burge Smith

IMG_9539

“The minimum [re-afforestation] for safety is one third of the total land area. I think what is happening to the elms must be alerting the whole country to the necessity of trees, of the need for more trees. The elm has the largest leaf surface of any tree in Britain. If you defoliate a large elm and put the leaves together edge to edge, they would cover ten acres. So naturally, the first tree to suffer from air pollution was the elm and, of course, when an elm is suffering from fatigue it is subject to attack by disease: the elm bark beetle, the carrier of the elm fungus, comes along and the tree succumbs.

I look at it this way. If a person is living a normal life and not abusing themselves – not smoking too much, not eating too much, not drinking too much – but living normally and eating the right food – they will be fit and well. It is only when they start abusing themselves that they are prone to attack by disease. It is the same with trees.

The next tree to go (the next tree with the largest leaf surface after the elm) is probably the beech: after that the sycamore: and so on. Finally it will be Man’s turn. We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of trees and as far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more trees – to plant for our lives.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Act. Don’t react. See a need, fix it first. Worry about the details later. If you wait until you are asked you have just missed a golden opportunity. They are fleeting and rare.” Philip Wollen founder of Winsome Kindness Trust

The fate of the MVA Interpretive Centre

Man is not alone in the universe ~ I suppose we all work for the MVA because we believe in the cause.

“Meewasin Interpretive Centre closure ‘sad day’ wrote Brandon Hrder in the Saskatoon Star Phoenix, Thusday June 9, 2016. The MVA formed in 1979, using a small office on campus before the Meewasin Centre opened Monday February 15, 1988 reported Julie Fleming Juarez in the Saskatoon Mirror. February 15, is Canada’s National Heritage Day, quite fitting for the Interpretive Centre grand opening, which has a focus on Saskatoon’s history, promoting education, understanding and awareness of the South Saskatchewan River Valley, and its heritage and natural resources.

Located at 402-Third Avenue, the centre is on the eastern perimeter of Saskatoon’s River Landing. As part of the heritage of Saskatoon the Meewasin Valley Authority Centre had been situated at the foot of the Broadway bridge and Traffic Bridge.

A bit of history reveals that the Victoria Bride or “Traffic Bridge was a truss bridge that spanned South Saskatchewan River, connecting Victoria Avenue to 3rd Avenue South and Spadina Crescent in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Opened October 10, 1907, it was the first vehicle bridge in Saskatoon, replacing an unreliable ferry service. The promised construction of the bridge was considered a prime factor in the amalgamation of the towns of Saskatoon, Nutana and Riversdale. The Traffic Bridge was the only road bridge in Saskatoon until 1916, when the University Bridge was completed.In 2010, the bridge was permanently closed due to severe corrosion and has been partially demolished.”~Wikipedia

The four MVA galleries showcase Saskatoon’s character, the city’s economic history, the impact of being city located astride the South Saskatchewan River, the the people who chose to live here. Heritage photos of Saskatoon and a large map grace the walls alongside video displays.

The interpretive centre co-exits with the Meewasin administration offices. “One of our functions is to tell people about the history of Saskatoon,” explained Brenda Janzen one of the MVA’s interpreters of 1989, “Another function is to tell people about the Meewasin Valley – how they can enjoy the trail and the various parks located in the city.” The MVA centre liaisons with community groups, the Saskatoon Heritage Society and Geological Society in setting up changing displays. Bird Watching Workshops, self-guided tour packages and hosted hiking tours have been special MVA feature presentations.

The MVA created in 1979 focuses on the health of the river valley and the protection of its natural eco-system. The MVA, to this end they organize the annual spring clean ups of the river banks, and parks. Youth groups, Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, Community Associations, church affiliations, corporations, students, and volunteers all come out to take part in cleaning up the city and area. These conservation efforts protect the city’s water supply as trash has an adverse effect upon water quality contamination and poses threats to drinking water and wildlife. The Meewasin founded the Partners for the Saskatchewan River Basin PFSRB in 1993 which undertakes river management practices.

MVA architect Raymond Moriyama received the Canadian Architect Yearbook’s 1979 Award of Excellence for the MVA 100 year plan, reported the Saskatoon Star Phoenix February 9, 1980. Moriyama’s vision and concepts included recreational facilities, winter gardens, a wharf area, glassed in pedestrian corridors, a new City Hall, new shopping centre, experimental housing on the University of Saskatchewan campus, and walking and interpretive centres slung low beneath the bridges.

On February 25, 1984, it was found in the Saskatoon StarPhoenix, that the MVA were themselves recipients of Canada’s Governor General’s Conservation Award.
October 19, 1980 the MVA wins the international award, setting Saskatoon on the world stage. Again February 16, 1993 the MVA wins a National Award and attends an acceptance ceremony in Manitoba.

The first projects of the MVA were the Bessborough Skating Rink and the Meewasin Park setting the stage for river bank planning and public engagement with nature in the city. The MVA spear-headed projects to remove a contaminated site where “Agent Orange” had been buried, and managed to restore the site to a naturalized area. The Meewasin, City of Saskatoon and Ducks Unlimited along with corporate sponsors and environmental groups worked together to facilitate wetlands habitats in storm water ponds. The City of Saskatoon treats sewage with secondary and tertiary treatment practices, and discontinued the flow of alum and iron into the river as awareness of the river grew. Meewasin undertakes a huge planting of native flora, and trees. To encourage native species, such as crocus and others, controlled burns are implemented as part of the naturalized eco-system management. The care and stewardship of the river now, will make the wetlands, the waterway and the river valley ecologically sustainable for many generations to come.

The MVA, does indeed have a profound effect upon the current generation who can appreciate the riverside and park trails, learn about Saskatoon’s history at the interpretive centre, respect and live in harmony with nature well into the future.  The MVA brings together public programs and projects to conserve and enhance the natural resources along the South Saskatchewan River, and the waters which drain in to the river.

 

The interpretive centre gets between 15,000 to 20,000 visitors annually, and serving close to 1/2 million visitors since 1988. It is during the summer months, the beginning of the tourist season when the MVA interpretive centre is appreciated by visitors from around the world. What will it take to keep the interpretive centre functioning for school classes of children and for tourists to appreciate the unique history of Saskatoon, and to learn about the MVA river bank trails, and parkway system?

The current location used by the MVA is 16,200 square feet, in a former Rothman’s tobacco warehouse originally constructed in 1972, and was bought by the MVA in 1986. This building is located in Friendship Park right along the river bank. The interpretive centre features four galleries open to the public.

As Saskatoon grows to 1/2 million by 2023 what do the citizens want for their city? What should the City of Saskatoon look like in these short seven years from now? Do the citizens appreciate having the parks, the several afforestation areas, the walkways in the city of Saskatoon? How can the residents of the city of Saskatoon and area let the MVA know their appreciation of programs at the Beaver Creek Conservation Area, of accessible trails, of the naturalized restoration and reclamation work undertaken at Cranberry Flats Conservation area, of the creation and upkeep of MVA’s river bank trails and park connector routes. Even planting Monarch Butterfly gardens to save the declining population of Monarch Butterflies has been an MVA initiative.

As there are a greater number of residents with an urban background they have less opportunity to appreciate the natural prairie grasslands, forests and wetlands. It is due to the efforts of the City of Saskatoon working in conjunction with the MVA, that the residents are, indeed, able to appreciate the many naturalized parks in and around Saskatoon, the native wildlife prairie habitats, the afforested areas which become homes to white-tail deer, rabbit, mule deer, mountain bluebird, black-capped chickadee. Not only activities limited to parks and educational programs, but the MVA is also actively preserving and protecting the North East Swale, and the West Swale wetlands and surrounding areas.

The fate of the MVA Interpretive Centre rests in your hands, Saskatoon.

If a package of cigarettes costs $15.00 for 25, and it is always easy to find money for cigarettes, why not make a monthly deposit for a year to the MVA of $15.00 so that the funding and staffing of the Interpretive Center in Saskatoon and at Beaver Creek can be sustained.

If a family four can dine for about $24.99 at many fast food chains, why not make a monthly deposit for a year to the MVA of $25.00 if you enjoy the parks and trails of Saskatoon.

If a family of four has a delightful time taking in a movie, and spending a sum of $40.00 to enter, and another $26.00 on snacks, why not make a monthly deposit to the MVA of $66.00 for a year as an appreciation of the entertainment your family spends in the city’s river bank parks, at Beaver Creek and Cranberry Flats Conservation Areas.

Saskatoon’s population in 2011 was 222,189, and of that population 170,144 were over the age of 19. If only half of this adult population would donate $20.00 a month for an entire year, an amazing trust fund could be started to support the conservation efforts of this environmental working to sustain the South Saskatchewan River valley now and for future generations. Pop over to the Meewasin Valley Authority website to make a donation and get involved!!!.  Talk to the corporation you work for as well, ask if they would  also love to support the MVA.

If you think it is wonderful to live in a city astride an amazing river, walk along the river bank, and take in the sights of the river valley, it would, indeed, be a splendid idea to send a little thank you to the MVA to continue their environmental conservancy work for the South Saskatchewan River wetlands.

A volunteer for the MVA, Derek Hill stated, “I suppose we all work for the MVA because we believe in the cause.” (Saskatoon Star Phoenix. September 2, 1988)

If you think that classes of children, tourists worldwide, and your family enjoy the self-guided tours available at the MVA, and the galleries showcasing Saskatoon’s history at the Meewasin Valley Interpretive Centre, justsend them a thank you and let them know how important the Meewasin Valley Authority and their several environmental programs and ecologically sustainable initiatives along the South Saskatchewan River Valley are to you.

“We are all the guardians of this precious resource of Meewasin.” (Meewsin Explorer. Vol 21 #5 November December 2014.)

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Armstrong, Jeannie. Discover City Magic at Meewasin Centre. S-P Creative Services. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. May 13, 1989.

Boklaschuk, Shannon. MVA: Funding frozen since 1986, board chair says. The StarPhoenix. April 11, 2006

French, Janet. Trails, butterflies on MVA’s radar. The StarPhoenix. Aparil 7, 2002
Harder, Brandon. Meewasin Interpretive Centre Closure ‘sad day’. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. Thursday June 9, 2016.

Fuller, Cam. MVA centre rich in city’s lore. Saskatoon StarPhoenix. February 20, 1988.

Hanley, Paul. Meewasin Helps Saskatoon shine internationally. The StarPhoenix. December 5, 2006.

Juarez, Julie Fleming. Meewasin Centre to be opened on Monday. The Saskatoon Mirror. February 10, 1988.

Planner calls for lake, drive with view of river. MVAs goals spell green. The StarPhoenix. September 7, 1991

Statistics Canada Saskatoon Census Profile 2011 Government of Canada. 2016-05-02

Tank, Phil. Urgent Needs put MVA in ‘precious position’. Saskatoon StarPhoenix January 4, 2016

The fate of an individual or a nation will always be determined by the degree of his or its harmony with the forces and laws of Nature and the universe. Man is not alone in the universe but is surrounded by sources of power, harmony and knowledge. The fullness of life depends upon man’s harmony with the totality of the natural cosmic laws. Our individual evolution is a job that has to be carried on day by day by each individual himself. It is a livelong task.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.