Plants thrive in a healthy environment

International Year of Plant Health
International Year of Plant Health International Plant Protection Convention “FAO Conference approved a draft resolution requesting the General Assembly of the United Nations to consider declaring 2020 as the International Year of Plant Health (IYPH).”

There are many considerations during the International Year of Plant Health.  One of these considerations is to “protect, manage and restore terrestrial and marine environments to keep plants healthy…Plants can only thrive in a healthy environment. .”source

If you would like more information:

IYPH dedicated website  https://www.fao.org/plant-health-2020

       Twitter  https://twitter.com/ippcnews

        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ippcheadlines/

         Linkedin Groups https://www.linkedin.com/groups/3175642/

International Year of Plant Health is an initiative of the

International Plant Protection Convention and

International Year of Plant Health Secretariats

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Protecting life

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover…A country’s very poor that doesn’t have trees.” ~Richard St. Barbe  Baker

YXE Green Strategy

Agenda is online for the City of Saskatoon Standing Policy Committee on Environment, Utilities and Corporate Services.  SPC on EUC Monday, February 10, 2020, 9:00 a.m Item 7.1 The Green Infrastructure Strategy: Towards an Interconnected Green Network [CK 4110-38] 12 – 52A report from the General Manager, Utilities and Environment is  A PowerPoint presentation will be provided.

Letters or requests to speak relating to matters that are already on the Council or Committee agenda must be received according to the guidelines on this webpage.

Every act of kindness benefits the giver, as well as the receiver.
-Katrina Mayer

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

 

Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Act. Don’t react. See a need, fix it first. Worry about the details later. If you wait until you are asked you have just missed a golden opportunity. They are fleeting and rare.” Philip Wollen founder of Winsome Kindness Trust

“How many lessons of faith and beauty we should lose, if there were no winter in our year!”–Thomas Wentworth Higginson

 

Lungs of the Modern City

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (Urban Regional Park) and George Genereux Urban Regional Park both had their beginning  in 1972 with their commitment to the Green Survival Program

“Trees are the lungs of the modern city. The more industrialize the city, the more trees it requires to purify the air.” (Liddell, 1971)  “the resurgence of academic interest in resource management and environmental planning that has occurred over the past 10 years This resurgence has occurred in parallel with the growth of wide public concern over possible future resource shortages, pollution, the loss of valued wildlife species and landscapes and, more generally, over the possibility and desirability of sustaining current economic development patterns and associated life styles.  …There is a widespread appreciation of the environment and the threats it faces… concerns range from global issues to do with the future of industrial society, the extinction of species and even human survival, down to local issues such as preserving neighbourhood amenities” (Goyder, 1983)

“The nursery industry continued to evolve across the country in the 1970s.  With environmental concerns growing in this period, the Association for American Nurserymen launched their “Green Survival” program.  This initiative stressed plants’ role in buffering noise pollution, trapping air pollutants, cooling the earth, etc. “(National Register of Historic Places Registration, 2014)

The Green Survival Campaign spread across North America.  “A ‘Survival’ Message Green Survival has a message.  It is simply that “each individual can have a positive, meaningful effect on the quality of life by planting trees and other living plants.” The appeal of this simple message has spread across the nation, and beyond, to Canada, England, Holland and Germany. (‘Green Survival ‘Time, 1977)

Afforestation such as the tree planting undertaken by the City of Saskatoon Park’s department to create the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park is the establishment of a forest or stand of trees (forestation) in an area where there was no previous tree cover.

Green Survival” is the nursery industry’s own program for improving the environment, more beauty to see, and conservation of land from erosion with plantings of trees and shrub.  ‘We have a great obligation here…We also have a great contribution to make’” said the AAN President Harold R. Nickel.  (96th Annual Convention Report AAN)

Bibliography

96th Annual Convention Report (PDF), September 28 1971, retrieved July 11 2019

Goyder, Lowe; Goyder, J (1983), Environmental Groups In Politics, Environmental Groups in Politics The Resource Management Series., London, UK: George Allen and Unwin (Publishers) Ltd, ISBN 0-01-329043-4, ISSN 0261-0701, retrieved July 8, 2019

‘Green Survival’ Time, Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel and Enterprise. Republished online by Newspaper Archive, May 3, 1977, retrieved July 11 2019

Liddell, Ken (November 11, 1978). “Ken Liddell’s Column”. The Calgary Herald.

National Register of Historic Places Registration Form Sherman Nursery Company Historic District Charles City Iowa (PDF), NPS Form 10-900 OMB 1024-0018, National Park Service, National Office, Washington, DC: United States Department of the Interior. National Park Service, 2014, retrieved July 11 2019

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)  Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.” data-medium-file=”https://stbarbebaker.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/qr-code-for-paypal-donations.png?w=128″ data-large-file=”https://stbarbebaker.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/qr-code-for-paypal-donations.png?w=128″ />
Paypal Donations QR code
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover…A country’s very poor that doesn’t have trees.” ~Richard St. Barbe  Baker

Earth Day Week

 

Gaia’s main problems are not industrialization, ozone depletion, overpopulation, or resource depletion. Gaia’s main problem is the lack of mutual understanding and mutual agreement in the noosphere about how to proceed with those problems. We cannot rein in industry if we cannot reach mutual understanding and mutual agreement based on a worldcentric moral perspective concerning the global commons. And we reach the worldcentric moral perspective through a difficult and laborious process of interior growth and transcendence.
Ken Wilber

Paul D. Tinari organized Canada’s Earth Day September 11, 1980 during Earth Day Week beginning Sept 6, 1980

 

A forest ecology is a delicate one. If the forest perishes, its fauna may go with it. The athshean word for world is also the word for forest.

Ursula K. Le Guin

The first Canadian Earth Day was held on Thursday, September 11, 1980, and was organized by Paul D. Tinari, then a graduate student in Engineering Physics/Solar Engineering at Queen’s University. Flora MacDonald, then MP for Kingston and the Islands and former Canadian Secretary of State for External Affairs, officially opened Earth Day Week on September 6, 1980 with a ceremonial tree planting and encouraged MPs and MPPs across the country to declare a cross-Canada annual Earth Day. The principal activities taking place on the first Earth Day included educational lectures given by experts in various environmental fields, garbage and litter pick-up by students along city roads and highways as well as tree plantings to replace the trees killed by Dutch Elm Disease.source

Those of us who consider ourselves to be somehow involved in the birthing of a new age, should discover Gaia as well. The idea of Gaia may facilitate the task of converting destructive human activities to constructive and cooperative behavior. It is an idea which deeply startles us, and in the process, may help us as a species to make the necessary jump to planetary awareness.
James Lovelock

Since 1970, Earth Day supports environmental protection,  and was supported by the  2016 acknowledging the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference historic draft climate protection treaty.  Earth Day was first celebrated on the first day of spring (northern hemisphere) March 21, 1970, however, United States Senator Gaylord Nelson initiated Earth Day on April 22 in America.  March for Science is also commemorated April 22, and the People’s Climate Mobilization follows on April 29.

Trees have a way of bringing people together to celebrate a shared heritage. With over 80% of Canadians living in cities and towns, our urban forests are vital to our quality of life, and this recognition will go a long way toward ensuring that they continue to be planted and cared for in urban locations… For every person who stops and thinks about how they can help grow and maintain trees, Canada becomes a cleaner, better country.Cision Canada

The United Nations celebrates International Mother Earth Day on April 22 “to remind each of us that the Earth and its Ecosystems provide us with life and sustenance….The Earth and its ecosystems are our home. In order to achieve a just balance among the economic, social, and environmental needs of present and future generations, it is necessary to promote harmony with nature and the Earth.”

I believe that we will see a lot of destruction, but I believe that if we can see the right patterns and draw the right lessons from that destruction, we might be able to rebuild before it’s too late. And then I have that ultimate optimism that even if we can’t, life will rebuild itself. In a way, the global economy might collapse, but Gaia won’t, and people’s ingenuity won’t. We will rebuild society, we will rebuild local economies, we will rebuild human aspirations.
Vandana Shiva

in 1922, Richard St. Barbe Baker began the International Tree Foundation with Forest Guides, or Forest Scouts, called the Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees who… “promised before N’gai, the High God, that they would protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.”

Only rarely do we see beyond the needs of humanity, and he linked this blindness to our Christian and humanist infrastructure. It arose 2,000 years ago and was then benign, and we were no significant threat to Gaia. Now that we are over six billion hungry and greedy individuals, all aspiring to a first-world lifestyle, our urban way of life encroaches upon the domain of the living Earth.
James Lovelock

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)  Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

EcoFriendly Sask Thank you

EcoFriendly Sask

The Stewards and Stakeholders truly appreciate your thoughtful contribution towards signs at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Through your donation, we will be able to accomplish our goal to take the necessary steps to establish interpretive signs to create knowledge and understanding of the greenspace at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. You truly make a great difference to supporting the environment, and for this we are truly grateful!

Your generosity will directly benefit the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area greenspace and the visitors from Saskatoon and area.   Thank you for supporting this worthwhile mission to enhance and protect the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area with place based knowledge.

The Stewards and Stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area have met with the Meewasin Valley Authority, and with the City of Saskatoon to set a plan and procedure into place.

Additionally, we are in the process of reaching out to schools, teachers and classrooms in order to involve students in the process of creating interpretive signs to provide education and awareness of the significance of the afforestation area, of Richard St. Barbe Baker the first global conservationist, to impart important conservation messages,  alongside natural and historical interpretation of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

EcoFriendly Sask, your support of this local environment project is truly invaluable.

Thanks again from the Stewards and Stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Eco-Friendly Sask. CA Sponsor Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Clean Up 2016 Saskatoon, SK CA
Eco-Friendly Sask. CA Sponsor Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Signs  2019

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

Native Rose Plant Ethnobiology

Native Rose Plant Ethnobiology

Part 6

What is taxonomy? Part 1 | Rosids Part 2 | genus Rosa Part 3
| Rose Species Part 4 | Rose reproduction Part 5  

Ethnobiology embarks on the scientific study of how human cultures interacted with the environment, and the ever-changing relationship with biota and organisms.  Ethnobiologists investigate how human societies have used nature, and how do they view nature in the distant past, to the immediate present.  They investigate the common lore or the folk knowledge of how humans  interact with organisms.  Traditional knowledge is rapidly being lost, and the field of ethnobiology is a process of knowledge acquisition and organisation for the management of useful plant and animal populations in the natural system and environment.

Besides wild animals, humans have been known to value the nutritional value of these plants.  In addition to people and animals, worms and insects have an affinity for the nutrition value of the rose hips, so it is best to check for worms before eating a rose hip.  According to Joseph Shorthouse in his report, Galls Induced by Cynipid Wasps of the Genus Diplolepis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) on the Roses of Canada’s Grasslands, native rose plants “are host to insects in a variety of guilds, including leaf chewers, leaf miners, fluid feeders, stem borers, pollinators, and gall inducers.”

Rose hips with seeds and skins removed make jams, marmalades, catsup, jellies and syrups.  Rose hips are tastiest for those used to a North American diet after the first frost which brings out the sweetness.  This same rose hip pulp may be dried and ground into powder form as an addition to baking recipes or puddings.  Young green rose hips can be peeled and cooked. Rose petals are known for their perfume.

Please be stewards of  both the afforestation areas – Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities, do not harvest too many parts of the rose plant.  Learn and check into the scientific names of plants, and make a good native rose plant identification from Part 1 Part 2 | Part 3| Part 4 | Part 5 .  Nature is very diverse, and evolves and plant species may hybridize with each other.  When in doubt, please leave the plant out before harvesting so that other visitors and animal foragers may enjoy the native roses.   It is wise take only pictures and to leave no trace when visiting the Saskatoon afforestation areas to mitigate ecological damage.  The afforestation areas are experiencing an exponential increase in the human footprint, and a little foresight will ensure that the plants are not extirpated from the greenspace.  Consider where you are digging and harvesting: do you have permission? Who do you get permission from?  Who owns the land, and who manages the land of the afforestation areas?

“If a man loses one-third of his skin he dies; if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it too dies. If the Earth is a ‘sentient being’, would it not be reasonable to expect that if it loses one-third of its trees and vegetable covering, it will also die?” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Buds and flowers or the soaked and boiled root cambium can be used in the making of rose water, a base for eye wash treatments.  Leaves, flowers and buds can be infused in the making of teas. When using the bark of the rose bush for a tea decoction, muscles would find relief and diarrhea would be relieved.  Flowers and flower buds may relieve diarrhea or stomach upset.

First Nations people sometimes smoked the inner bark like of the rose bush like tobacco.  There are reports that native persons ate the rosehip rinds, and left the seeds to grow again. Eating the layer of hairs around the seeds may cause irritation to the mouth and to the digestive tract.  The rose hips may create diarrhea, if too many are ingested. A compress from the boiled rose roots would relieve swelling.  The solution made from boiled rose roots could be gargled to relieve swelling of tonsillitis and sore throats, or mouth sores.

Besides the ethnobotanical uses of wild roses, rose wood can be fashioned into arrows and pipe stems.  Rose hips would be used historically as beads before mass-manufactured beads were acquired through trade as early as the nineteenth century.  The Cree called the Rosehip okiniy pl. okiniyak ᐅᑭᓂᕀ

Do you think you would like to be an ethnobiolgist? Why or why not?

Debate the efficacy of native rose plants related to ethnobiology and health science, including developing materials to support the arguments for and against a posi៝񑀀on.  Would ethnobiological approaches contribute to mental, physical, or spiritual perspectives on health?

Do native rose plants provide any important macronutrients to maintain human, insect or animal health?

Do humans still rely on native rose plants for treating illness, disease, or to improve health and wellness?  Are native rose plants a common garden plant for most city residents?  How have communities and people changed historically to contemporary times?  Could you purchase herbs, vitamins, essential oils from native rose plants in the local grocery store?  in the health food store?

Have native rose plants contributed to traditional or indigenous rituals or ceremonies or in  health care?  Do native rose plants contribute in these same ways to any other culture world wide?

If a  health care professional must weigh the following ethical decisions would a health care professional work hand in hand with an ethnobiologist?

  • What can be done for the patient? (intervention technologies)
  • Does the patient understand the options? (informed consent)
  • What does the patient want? (autonomy)
  • hat are the benefits? (beneficence)
  • Will it harm the patient? (non‐maleficence)
  • Are the patient’s requests fair and able to be satisfied? (justice)
  • Are the costs involved fair to society? (economic consequences)

When relying upon the various components of the native rose plant for health care, contrast – researching the differences, and compare -delving into the similarities through study those  decisions made related to ethnobiology and health care from the various viewpoints of individuals who hold different beliefs.

How do plants – the native rose bushes, and animals – humans harvesting petals, root parts, and leafs interact to meet their basic needs?

What are some uses of the various parts of a rose bush plant based upon the form and materials that the plant is made of?

Compare the texture, and properties of the various part of the native rose plant.  How do the leaves, petals, rose hips and stems compare with hardness, smell, flexibility, etc  How do the characteristics of the rose plant create a useful feature for the plant in its survival?  How do these same characteristics suggest that the various parts of the rose plant might be useful for a specific function, material source or usefulness for different objects.

How do people show respect for living things such as the native rose bush plants?

Describe and evaluate the methods in which the parts of the native rose plants may be used appropriately and efficiently to the benefit of themselves, others, and the environment.

How do humans and animals take note of their senses as they interact with a native rose bush.  If humans were to eat the rose hip or smell the rose flower, what are some safety considerations?

What season would be great to find a rose hip?  What time of the year would people locate a rose flower?  Why do roses make these adaptations?

What are the consequences of combining a professional health care approach with the ethnobiologist report?  Create and debate with arguments for and against a posi៝tion or hypothesis.

Do you know of another way that humans interacted with native rose bushes?

Identify both macronutrients and micronutrients found in the various plant parts of the native rose bush.  Show how these sources and the amounts found in the native rose plant are necessary for health, and how they may affect the wellness of a human or animal.

Create a through scientific investigation into ethnobiology regarding native rose plants.  Start with a question, then create a hypothesis, and then design a procedure to test the hypothesis with those details needed to collect and analyze the data.

What structural or physiological adaptations and methods does the rose hip employ to defend itself against predators?

Analyze and debate how the personal beliefs, culture and understanding effects the appreciation of place based learning  with the environment is influenced bypersonal experiences and cultural understandings.

Discuss the roles of native rose plants as providers of medicinal, spiritual, nutritional needs of Western, First Nations, Métis and other cultures.

How many native rose bushes would you need to grow to sustain healthy eating practice for various ages, sizes and types of people for their lifestyle requirements?

What is appeal from the three native rose species to animals that live in the afforestation areas? Prickly Rose (Rosa Acicularlis Lindl.) the Prairie Rose (Rosa arkansana)  and Wood’s Rose, or Wild Rose (Rosa woodsii)

What is appeal from the three native rose species to humans historically?  Do the rose species offer the same advantages? Prickly Rose (Rosa Acicularlis Lindl.) the Prairie Rose (Rosa arkansana)  and Wood’s Rose, or Wild Rose (Rosa woodsii)

Are there any other rose species which you may see in the afforestation areas?  Why or why not?

Which rose species have you seen in the afforestation areas?

What happens from over-harvesting?

What is a hori hori?

Who owns the land, and who manages the land of the afforestation areas?

Can you establish native rose plants in your own yard, or in your community garden?

Bibliography for Native Rose Plants Part 1 Part 2 | Part 3
| Part 4 | Part 5  | Part 6

  1. Rosa arkansana Porter in T. C. Porter and J. M. Coulter, Syn. Fl. Colorado. 38. 1874., Flora of North America. FNA Vol. 9., 1998–2014, retrieved June 20, 2019
  2. Rosa woodsii Lindley, Ros. Monogr. 21. 1820., Flora of North America. FNA Vol. 9., 1998–2014, retrieved June 20, 2019
  3. Rosa acicularis Lindley, Ros. Monogr. 44, plate 8. 1820., Flora of North America. FNA Vol. 9., 1998–2014, retrieved June 20, 2019

Banerjee, S. Mishtu; Creasey, Kim; Gertzen, Diane Douglas (January 2001), Native Woody Plant Seed Collection Guide for British Columbia (PDF), Ministry of Forests Tree Improvement Branch, retrieved June 20, 2019

Bebeau, G.D. (2013), Common Name Prairie Rose (Prairie Wild Rose, Arkansas Rose), The Friends of the Wild Flower Garden, Inc. Trees Shrubs of the Eloise Butler Wildflower garden in the United States., retrieved June 20, 2019

Bessey CE (1908) The taxonomic aspect of the species question. Am Nat 42:218–224

Brayshaw, T. Christopher. (1996), Trees and Shrubs of British Columbia, UBC Press, ISBN 0774805641, 9780774805643 June 20, 2019

Brennont; et al. (October 24, 2018‎), Sessility (botany), Wikipedia, retrieved June 19, 2019

Britton, Nathaniel Lord; Brown, Addison (1970), Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States and Canada, Volume 2 of An Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States and Canada: From Newfoundland to the Parallel of the Southern Boundary of Virginia, and from the Atlantic Ocean Westward to the 102d Meridian, Dover Books on plants. Dover Books. Courier Corporation, ISBN 0486226433, 9780486226439, retrieved June 20, 2019

Brya; et al. (April 14, 2019‎), List of systems of plant taxonomy, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Chaney, Cathryn (2019), What Is the Calyx of the Flower?, Home Guides SF Gate, retrieved June 20, 2019

Clark, Lewis J. (1974), Lewis Clark’s field guide to Wild flowers of forest and woodland in the Pacific Northwest, Gray’s Publishing Limited, ISBN 0-88826-048-2. Page 51.

Common Name Prickly Rose (Bristly Rose), The Friends of the Wild Flower Garden, Inc., 2013, retrieved June 19, 2019

Common Name Wood’s Rose (Mountain Rose, Western Rose), The Friends of the Wild Flower Garden, Inc., 2013, retrieved June 19, 2019

Conrad, C. Eugene (July 1987), Common Shrubs of Chaparral and Associated Ecosystems of Southern California (PDF), United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. Berkeley, California. General Technical Report PSW-99., retrieved June 20, 2019

Cormack, R.G.H. (1974), Wild Flowers of Alberta, Commercial Printers Ltd. Edmonton, p. 159, ISBN 0-88826-048-2

Coxhead, Peter; et al. (June 17, 2019‎), Stamen, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Culver, Denise; Smith, Pam (June 26, 2018), Botany Primer (PDF), Colorado Natural Heritage Program. Warner college of Natural Resources. Colorado State University., retrieved June 20, 2019

Details of… Scientific Name Rosa woodsii, School of Horticulture Plant Database, 2015, retrieved June 19, 2019

Dgettings; et al. (June 16, 2019), Glossary of botanical terms, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Fora of Wisconsin. Rosa acicularis, Wisconsin State Herbarium, UW-Madison, retrieved June 19, 2019

Harika, Gupta, 6 Major Types of Inflorescence (With Diagrams), BiologyDiscussion, retrieved June 19, 2019

Hauser, Alan S (2006), Rosa arkansana, Fire Effects Information System (Feis) Syntheses about fire ecology and fire regimes in the United States USDA, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laborator, retrieved June 20, 2019

Jain, Khusboo, 10 Main Types of Stipule Present in a Plant (With Diagram), BiologyDiscussion, retrieved June 19, 2019

Jiddani; et al. (May 23, 2019‎), Pinnation, Wikipedia, retrieved June 19, 2019

Keane, Kathlee; Howarth, Dave (2003), Field Guide of Medicinal Plants for the Prairie Provinces The Standing People, Rootwoman and Dave, p. 74, ISBN 0-9699505-3-5

Ladyka, Colin, Rosa acicularis, Colin’s Virtual Herbarium, retrieved June 20, 2019

Lee, Glen (1998–2014), Rosa acicularis (Prickly Rose) – photos and description, Saskatchewan Wildflowers, retrieved June 20, 2019

Lee, Glen (1998–2014), Rosa arkansana (Prairie Rose) – photos and description, Saskatchewan Wildflowers, retrieved June 20, 2019

Lee, Glen (1998–2014), Rosa woodsii (Wood’s Rose) – photos and description, Saskatchewan Wildflowers, retrieved June 20, 2019

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Rosa arkansana – Porter, Plants For A Future, 1996–2012, retrieved June 20, 2019

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Wild Rose Comparison, The Friends of the Wild Flower Garden, retrieved June 19, 2019

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For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain. ” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 “We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

A New Age

Those of us who consider ourselves to be somehow involved in the birthing of a new age, should discover Gaia as well. The idea of Gaia may facilitate the task of converting destructive human activities to constructive and cooperative behavior. It is an idea which deeply startles us, and in the process, may help us as a species to make the necessary jump to planetary awareness.
James Lovelock

World Environment Day

is celebrated June 5.

 

“World Environment Day reminds us that we have a global responsibility to safeguard our environment – and that each of us has a role to play to preserve and protect it.”

Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister

 “We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

in 1922, Richard St. Barbe Baker began the International Tree Foundation with Forest Guides, or Forest Scouts, called the Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees who… “promised before N’gai, the High God, that they would protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.”

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.” ~ Will Rogers