Mankind as steward of the biosphere

“Man’s life, in sickness and in health, is bound up with the forces of nature, and that nature, so far from being opposed and conquered, must rather be treated as an ally and friend, whose ways must be understood, and whose counsel must be respected.” ~Lewis Mumford. Page vii

“In the selection of areas intrinsically suitable for conservation, the factors selected were: features of historic value, high quality forests and marshes, bay beaches, streams, water-associated wildlife habitats, intertidal wildlife habitats, unique geological and physiographic features, scenic land and water features, and scarce ecological associations. “Page 107

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park, both provide historic value, high quality forests, unique geological features, scenic land, and scarce ecological associations.  Though, both are classified as wetlands, the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area features the permanent wetland of the Chappell Marsh with its water-associated wildlife habitats.

“The salient factors selected for determining recreation areas are:

Passive

  • Unique Physiographic Features
  • Scenic water features, streams
  • Features of historic value
  • High-quality forests
  • High-quality marshes
  • Scenic land features
  • Unique geologic features
  • Scarce ecological associations
  • Water-associated wildlife habitats
  • Field and forest wildlife habitats

Active

  • Bay beaches
  • Expanse of water for pleasure craft
  • Fresh water areas
  • Riparian lands
  • Flat land
  • Existing and potential recreation areas

Areas most suited for urbanization are determined separately for the two components of urbanization: residential and commercial-industrial developments.” Page 112

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park are both existing and potential recreation areas, are very much flat lands, feature field and forest wildlife habitats, comprise unique physiographic features, encompass high-quality forests, features of historic value, and unique geologic features.  The West Swale is a unique Pleistocene event which is unique and separate from the North East Swale. 

The most restrictive factors which are common to these developments are also identified:

  • Slopes
  • Forested areas
  • Poor surface drainage
  • Areas susceptible to erosion
  • Areas susceptible to flooding.” Page 113

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park are both areas susceptible to flooding, and both are amazing forested areas.  Learn more as the City of Saskatoon, and surrounding area  developed by the Partnership for Growth P4G partners moves forward to grow to 1/2 million. P4G is made up of a collaboration between the Cities of Saskatoon, Martensville and Warman, the Town of Osler and the RM of Corman Park #344.  “After much consultation with the public and their own administration, the City of Saskatoon approved its official Growth Plan to Half a Million.”~Kelly Macsymic Commercial Real Estate News 

City of Saskatoon future growth maps

P4G maps.

.  

“We need nature as much in the city as in the countryside.  In order to endure we must maintain the bounty of the great cornucopia which is our inheritance…It is not a choice of either the city or the countryside: both are essential, but today it is nature, beleaguered in the country, too scarce in the city which has become precious…Our eyes do not divide us from the world but unite us with it….Man is that uniquely conscious creature who can perceive and express.  He must become the steward of the biosphere.  To do this he must design with nature.” Page 5

“The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker

Bibliography:

McHarg, Ian L.  Design with Nature.  25th Anniversary Edition  John Wiley and Sons, Inc.  Toronto, ON, ISBN 0-471-55797-8, ISBN 0-471-11460-X Pbk.  1992

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations. – Richard St. Barbe Baker.

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Rethinking Boundaries

“Rethinking Boundaries.

The issues of who owns what, and off site issues such as noise, have a huge impact on the way a site can work as a landscape.  The way in which a site has been defined should be kept in mind when any project starts…Our work, more often than note, is about how people use spaces, how they live in  places, what they do, how they walk, dance, play, and rest.  Designing for people has the added benefit of empowering a proprietary population, people who will not only care about but care for the landscape.”  Ruddick, Margie.  Wild by Design.  Island Press.  Washington. 2016

Neault Road & the Afforestation Areas: The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans. (source and map page 26-27)  What is a rural commercial/industrial area?

“The Rural Commercial/Industrial category accommodates general commercial and industrial uses, including lightly-serviced industrial, storage, and commercial areas that require a large land base. This area shall be differentiated into Rural Commercial and Rural Industrial areas through future planning” Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan May 2017

 George Genereux Urban Regional Park is quarter section is 160 acres or one forth of a square mile which is a very very small amount of land in comparison to the massive number of sections under review and planning currently.(source and map page 26-27)

The land surrounding George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area) as previously mentioned is rural commercial/industrial area and takes up approximately 11 quarter sections of land (See map)- so how will the land planning affect the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area)? (source and map page 26-27)

How will the city of Saskatoon and greater metropolitan area tackle the particular benefits of the George Genereux urban regional park?  How will the George Genereux Urban Regional Park be preserved in perpetuity, as per the 1972 proclamation by the City of Saskatoon during this next phase of expansion?  As the population of the greater metropolitan area designs ever increasing land masses for commercial, industrial, and residential, where sill the quarter section of land afforested end up?

Did you know that trees, forests, and afforestation areas do help protect you from carcinogens!!!!  So in the middle of a rural commercial/industrial area, the George Genereux Urban Regional Park would mitigate harmful emissions which arise from rural industrial activities.  As rural and urban residents the information from long range planning provides a safer and healthier space for everyone to live and reside.  Building our urban forest is an amazing testament to both the city and the P4G planners.

“Our green space is more than just beautiful – it provides an abundance of ecological services. Purifying the air we breathe and the water in which we swim and drink are but a few examples. The cumulative benefits of these life-sustaining services provided by the urban canopy have been valued at more than $80-million annually. Ecological services such as these help to remediate some of the negative health effects brought on by industrial activities and the resulting pollution.  ”
Prevention as the cure: How trees help protect you from carcinogens

Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authority (SREDA).  The P4G meets in the effort to expand the city of Saskatoon, and surrounding environs to  between 273,000 and 301,000 by 2020; 302,000 and 349,000 by 2025; 333,000 and 405,000 by 2030; and between 368,000 and 470,000 by 2035.  (source) As a matter of fact Saskatoon eyes 1M population in 50 years.

“The prescription for this new global market economy is to rob federal governments of all legitimate roles in setting standards, whether for the health of the people or the environment. Deregulation and decentralization become dominant policy since all regulations are viewed as violations of the freedom of the market. Laws protecting wildlife, natural resources like forests, or for that matter, the quality of air, water and soil, or the integrity of biodiversity, are viewed as unacceptable obstacles in the part of the market’s role in mediating all matters. Still another aspect of the new global order is privatization. The private sector is to be trusted to apply the laws of the marketplace to all matters social and environmental. The test for response to toxins in our environment is to measure the harm of continued use against the alleged greater economic harm of a ban, even if the substance is a carcinogen, the benefits being easier to quantify than the harm, when it involves human pain and suffering. ” Knelman, F.H. , Ph.D.  The Sociology of Health The Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine Vol. 11, 3rd Quarter 1996 

 

 

“The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“what we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another” Mahatma Gandhi.

“George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

Where is the “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park in relation to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area?

Map showing the Afforestation Area Formerly Known As George Genereux Urban Regional Park, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, South West Off Leash Recreation Area, SW OLRA and the Afforestation Area All are within City of Saskatoon boundaries as of an annexation of 2005
adapted from the City of Saskatoon Projected Growth Concept Plan map

On any maps showing the city and RM of Corman Park 344, the small square extending west from SK Highway 7 is “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is south of Chappell Yards CNR train station, and north of Township Road 362 A (Cedar Villa Road)  Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is west of the Civic Operations Center (Bus Barns and Snow Dump facility), and east of the Saskatoon Italian Center and Saskatchewan Highway 7.

“George Genereux” Urban Regional Park is directly diagonal across Saskatchewan Highway 7 east.  “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park is a quarter section of afforested land.  Both “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area were purchased by the City of Saskatoon in 1960 and afforested in a 1972 “War Against Ecology Abuse” programme by the City of Saskatoon Parks Department to be used as a tree nursery.  1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before city council that these first  660 acres of afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity and this is approved.  The trees are much too big to transplant now, in 1979, the naming included Urban Regional Park in the title.

Both Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and  “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park  received their respective names  October 19 1978 (proposal to City Council) – October 30, 1978 (vote by city to approve and finalize). The name “George Genereux” was taken for a pocket park in another area of Saskatoon, leaving this urban regional park without a name.

What land development and growth is proposed for the land around George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

Forest Picture: George Genereux Urban Regional Park looking east from CNR Overpass SK Hwy 7
DSCN7452.JPG

“The clearest way into the universe is through a forest wilderness.”  John Muir

Who was George Genereux?

George Genereux (March 1 1935- April 10, 1989) was a seventeen year old high school student in 1952 when he won the Olympic Games Gold Medal for trap-shooting at the Summer Olympc Games held in Helsinki, Finland with 192 out of 200.  This was Canada’s first gold medal at the olympics since 1932.  Further to this honour, Genereux was bestowed the Lou Marsh Trophy for being Canada’s outstanding amateur athlete of the year, making him the youngest person in history to receive this honour.  The City of Saskatoon declared Genereux “Citizen of the Year” in 1952.  Canada honoured him as male athlete of 1952.  Genereux was installed in the Canada Sports Hall of Fame (1955), Saskatchewan  Sports Hall of Fame on October 31 of 1966, inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame 1986 and the Trapshooting Hall of Fame (1986).(Source, Source, Source, Source, Source and City of Saskatoon archives)

Genereux was born to Dr. Arthur Genereux (b1901 Lethbridge AB – March 12, 1975) and Catherine (d 1964).(Source)  At the age of 16, Genereux was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis, which ended his sporting career in trap shooting when he was 20.(Source and Source)

Genereux started training with his father, Dr. A.F. Genereux, and Jimmy Girgulis when he was 12 years old. James “Jim” Girgulis, himself won the Canadian Team Trap Shooting Campionship in 1939 and 1941.  Further, Girgulis, won every trap shooting event held across Western Canada.   Genereux went on to trap shooting events across  Canada and the United States.  At the age of 13 Genereux won the Midwestern International Handicap Honours, then he acquired 3 successive Manitoba – Saskatchewan junior titles. (source) Genereux won the Junior Championship of North America at the Grand American Handicap, held in Vandalia, Ohio in 1951.  During this event, Genereux broke 199 clay pigeons out of 200.  Genereux also placed second in the Oslo, Norway World Championships, 1952.  (Source, Source,  Source and City of Saskatoon archives)

Genereux, attended the University of Saskatchewan to earn his Arts and Sciences degree, then he went on the McGill University to study Medicine graduated 1960.  Dr. George Genereux was for years a Professor of Radiology at the Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon.

The biography submitted to City Council stated that “It is considered appropriate to select in his honour this particular tract of semi-wilderness with its favorable habitat for wildlife of many kinds.”

Genereux is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery along with his mother and father.  Genereux died April 10, 1989.

“At the time of his death he was working with three other internationally known  specialists on the third and fourth volumes of a study of chest diseases. ..Despite his own bad health, Genereux worked to advance the cause of medical knowledge.   If you can’t help yourself, you should use your God-given talents to help others,’ he said in one interview.” Saskatoon Star Phoenix April 11, 1989

The above map shows the relation of the afforestation areas to the West Swale, and its confluence at Yorath Island.  The West Swale, and the deposition of Yorath Island were created from the Pleistocene era “Yorath Island Spillway” event.

What land development and growth is proposed for the land around George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

“Trees exhale for us so that we can inhale them to stay alive. Can we ever forget that? Let us love trees with every breath we take until we perish.” 
― Munia Khan 

When walking in either “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park or the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area they can be seen one from the other by peering under the CNR overpass.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Bibliography:

Sharpshooter George3 Genereux grabs gold – Helsink, 1952 CBC Digital Archives.

George Genereux Canadian Encyclopedia

George Genereux Sports Hall of Fame.

George Genereux Sports Reference Olympic Sports

George Genereux Saskatoon Public Library

James Jim Girgulis Sask Sports Hall of Fame

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉.

 

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Neault Road & the Afforestation Areas

The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans. (source and map page 26-27)

A Stantec report showed potential heritage concerns south of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area and north of Hodgson Road. Currently the West Connector Route for the proposed provincial Saskatoon Freeway shows Hodgson road as the main access onto Valley Road and into the city of Saskatoon.

The Blairmore Sector Housing Development is shown on the map entitled West Connector Route Feasibility Study Figure 2.4 Existing and Future Land Uses

So the new name for Saskatchewan Highway 7 travelling northwards within city limits is Neault Road. Neault Road naming  is the north south route beginning just south of Hart Road, and north of the CNR railway overpass where Sk Highway 7 takes a corner (from travelling diagonally south west across the province to a turn where it extends due north).  Sk Highway 7 is a major  road which connects the City of Saskatoon with Vanscoy, Laura, Delisle, Zealandia, Rosetown, Fiske, Netherhill, Kindersley, and Alsask when you drive south west  out of the City.  Sk Highway 7 also is the highway to gain access to Provincial Highway 60 to Pike Lake Provincial Park.  (Map) (Sk Hwy 7 Route)

Travelling north  on Neault Road in Saskatoon does connect rurally with the Dalmeny Access road (highway 684). (map)

The proposed Saskatoon Freeway North route will run north and south alongside but west of  Neault Road, in such a way connecting Sk Highway 14 (22nd Street West) to the proposed new Saskatoon Freeway (north end of Saskatoon).  This proposed Saskatoon Freeway (bridge) will be north of 71 Street (Auction Mart Road)  about one mile north of the newly opened Chief Mistawisis Bridge (Marquis Drive and the North Commuter Parkway).(map)

This new Saskatoon Freeway route is a provincial initiative, and is a topic of the P4G meetings. (Draft Regional Plan)

Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authority (SREDA).  The P4G meets in the effort to expand the city of Saskatoon, and surrounding environs to  between 273,000 and 301,000 by 2020; 302,000 and 349,000 by 2025; 333,000 and 405,000 by 2030; and between 368,000 and 470,000 by 2035.  (source) As a matter of fact Saskatoon eyes 1M population in 50 years.

The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans.  George Genereux Urban Regional Park land area was annexed from the RM of Corman Park 344 on September 1, 2015, and the north, south and west borders of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park are also concurrent with the City limits boundary.   The eastern boundary of George Genereux Urban Regional Park is SK Hwy 7 at the CNR overpass.  This being said both Saskatoon, and the RM of Corman Park are involved in the P4G progress.(source and map page 26-27)

A Stantec report showed potential heritage concerns south of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area and north of Hodgson Road.  The southern border of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area is also the southern city limits boundary, across Cedar Villa Road (Township Road 362A) is Cedar Villa Estates and Chappell Marsh Conservation Area in the RM of Corman Park 344. Currently the West Connector Route for the proposed provincial Saskatoon Freeway shows Hodgson road as the main access onto Valley Road and into the city of Saskatoon.  As Saskatoon and the P4G area grows in population density, employment sectors are needed as well as housing.

The proposed Blairmore Sector Housing Development is shown on the map entitled West Connector Route Feasibility Study Figure 2.4 Existing and Future Land Uses

An employment sector includes a development of shopping malls, offices, and industrial areas for the economic trade of goods and services, to provide jobs for the projected, 300,000; 400,000 and 500,000 population density.   The City of Saskatoon has a Strategic plan 2013-2023 which encompasses seven strategic goals.(Plan) (pdf details of plan)

The Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan and further information for areas mainly north and north west of Saskatoon are online.  The Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth and Regional Planning is taking into consideration Natural and Heritage Resources The guiding principals of the P4G will take into account the guiding principles of Partnership, Efficiency, Sustainability, Opportunity, Equity + Inclusiveness, Flexiblity + Resilience and will follow 7 strategic directions; Regional infrastructure + services, Settlement patterns + complete communities, Regional economy + economic development, Quality of life, Governance + funding, Natural environment + drainage, along with Agriculture + Natural resources.

[P4G] “Regional Wetlands Inventory and Policy

Although the Green Network Refinement Study is intended to provide a comprehensive assessment of the Green Network to inform the future management of these areas for conservation and drainage functions, there is a lack of compiled information about the type, location, and importance of wetlands across the Region. Providing an inventory for the Region will support efforts by municipalities and P4G to conserve and protect important wetlands in the short-term.

In the longer term, a Regional Wetlands Policy may be developed to support wetlands protection, conservation, and enhancement across the Region. This Policy would complement the policies for the Green Network Study Area, and detail provisions for managing wetlands across the Region; coordinating conservation, mitigation, and enhancement projects; and linking wetlands protection with flood management and control.”(source)

The George Genereux Urban Regional Park, and Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Areas are both classified as wetlands according to Stantec, and provide for planning purposes, the mitigation of flood waters.  The West Swale is a low lying geological feature created from the Pleistocene Yorath Island Spillway.   The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located within the west swale, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, is located between the west swale and the CNR railway tracks.  1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before council that these first  660 acres of afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity, this is approved.

Have you attended any Partnership for Growth meetings? P4G includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman.  Find out how you can contribute to the plan.

“what we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another” Mahatma Gandhi.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

Saskatoon’s Green Belt

World Cities Day
31 October 2018

“The more successfully a city mingles everyday diversity of uses and users in its everyday streets, the more successfully, casually (and economically) its people thereby enliven and support well-located parks that can thus give back grace and delight to their neighborhoods instead of vacuity. ” ~Jane Jacobs American-Canadian journalist on Urban Planning

1960. A green belt for the city starts with Bert Wellman, Saskatoon Planning Department, who walked around Saskatoon’s perimeter choosing high spots of land for scenic beauty. Together with City Planner Bill Graham they worked on parkways and planted trees for the 1960 Circle Drive Parkway at these sites. Alfred Henry Browne “Man of the Trees” city Parks Superintendent – “The Man Who Made Saskatoon Beautiful” had a vision for Saskatoon – planting over 30,000 trees in the city. Wyndham Winkler Ashley local horticulturist and founder of the parks board advocated trees, and dispersed tree seedlings. They all envisioned a green city.
“The Richard St. Barb Baker Afforestation Area was established in 1960 to create a green belt around the city. Trees, which act as habitat for local wildlife, were planted in rows to generate a man-made forest.”(World Web.com) From Jeffery O’Brien at the City Archives, it has been determined that in 1960, the city purchased the land, parts of Sections 22 and 23 Township 36, Range 6 West of the third meridian, south of the CN Chappell yards.

1972. Planting in reserved lands purchased in 1960 for a tree belt begins in 1972. “A tree belt as a windbreak and to create a sense of enclosure is suggested along the edges of development for all areas which will not expand in the near future. Such a belt can already be considered along the northern boundary of Westview Heights. In conclusion it can be stated that a seemingly overwhelming demand lies ahead, however, through careful timing, programming and design there should be few difficulties. It should be remembered that the city forefathers reserved beautiful parks along the river, others have developed in Kiwanis Park, the University Grounds and numerous treed and landscaped streets. They did so under adverse conditions with a population of 20,000. They gave the city a reputation as the “City Beautiful” and today’s residents should be willing to uphold their tradition.” (Wellman. 1963. P 18)_At this time City Council passes an order in council that the afforestation is protected in perpetuity.

1976 On June 7, the Planning and Development Committee prepare the South Saskatchewan River Corridor Study: Towards a River Edge Authority. From this an autonomous agency arises upon which Saskatoon and Corman Park agree to implement the report.

1978 Moriyama’s Meewasin Valley Project 100-Year Conceptual Master Plan is submitted by Raymond Moriyama Architects and Planners. Moriyama’s report includes the river valley of the South Saskatchewan River and also rural lands adjacent to the natural drainage systems feeding into the South Saskatchewan River. The “West Swale” as described by Golder Associates is a low lying wetlands area which has its confluence at the South Saskatchewan River. The West Swale – its wetlands and surrounding environment does have a congruency with the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The core concept of Moriyama’s plan was that this is indeed a unique land with a unique people, the objective is balance. As the current plans for the South West Sector are to develop the area as a Business Park and not as residential, it is even more imperative to address conservation practices and sustainable open space and parks preservation for future generations. Additionally a sound business park development needs to take into account the fundamental values of the Meewasin Valley Authority
1/ Nature conservancy.
2/ The improvement of water quality and a reduction of pollution
3/ The need for increased education and research opportunities
4/ An enhancement between rural and urban inter-relationships and users.
5/ An improvement of recreational opportunities
6/ The moving forward on cultural aspects in the area.
“Meewasin Valley Authority The Meewasin Valley Authority (Meewasin) was formed in 1979 to act as an agent of the City, the University, and the Province of Saskatchewan to ensure a healthy and vibrant river valley, with a balance between human use and conservation. The Meewasin Valley Authority Act (MVA Act) establishes the mandate of Meewasin, its powers, and its jurisdiction, and the Conservation Zone. Meewasin‘s mandate can be summarized into three mandate areas: conservation, development, and education. It is around this time residents of the RM of Corman Park petitioned to protect agricultural lands from the MVA conservation area, leaving a portion of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area [RSBBAA] and all lands within the afforestation area formerly known as George Genereux park without management from the MVA

By 1979, the afforestation is named in the honour of Dr. Richard St. Barbe Baker, L.L.D., O.B.E. – founder of the international group “Men of the Trees”

2013 South West Off Leash Dog Park becomes a small fenced off area within the afforestation area. During this year, Golder Associates conducted their natural screening of the southwest sector which included the “Wooded area” namely Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Maps show that the Blairmore sector afforestation areas are congruent with the wetlands area named the “West Swale”

2014. “Advantages  of Incorporating Natural Wetlands as Features in Urban Planning Wetlands in landscape settings, whether urban or rural, provide open space, wildlife, aesthetic, recreation,  ambient temperature, and educational benefits to local and regional residents in addition the direct stormwater  flood management and water quality  improvements….natural wetlands provide valuable ecological benefits such as groundwater recharge and improved water quality, storage and cycling of nutrients and sediments, carbon sequestration, and enhanced wildlife habitat and biodiversity. [1]”

2016 The Afforestation Area is one of the nature viewing sites in the updated version of the Saskatoon Nature Society’s latest book, Nature and Viewing Sites in and Around Saskatoon.

“While you are looking, you might as well also listen, linger and think about what you see.” Jane Jacobs American-Canadian journalist on Urban Planning

 

“The important thing to remember is that even if you seem like the only one in all of North American who uses more native [native plants] than aliens, wildlife will be better off for your efforts. The effects will be cumulative, and probably synergistic, as more and more people join you. And don’t forget that plants are long-lived. The [native tree] you plant tomorrow could easily live 300 years, servicing innumerable insects, birds, squirrels, mice, raccoons, and deer every year of its life. Yes, you can make a difference on a small plot of land. You can even make a difference if you own no land. If you live in an apartment, you may be able to influence the landscaping habits of your landlord, or the company you work for, or the township supervisors who control your city parks, or your sibling who does own property. If we humans are capable of turning hundreds of millions of acres of rainforest into depleted grasslands, and extirpating millions of buffalo from the plains, and billions of passenger pigeons from the skies and cod from the North Atlantic, we are also capable of returning natives to our gardens.” ~ Douglas Tallamy

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1.  Wetland Design Guidelines For the City of Saskatoon CH2MHILL March 2014

2. Wellman, Hilbert E. and Henry F. Frolich. (1963) Community Planning Scheme 1963. Henry F. Frolich, Assistant City Planner, and Hilbert E. Wellman, City Planning and Building Director. Page 18.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

Afforestation

Download the Field Guide to the Ecosites of Saskatchewan’s Provincial Forests

What an amazing treasure written by M.S. McLaughlan, R.A. Wright and R.D. Jiricka for the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment to provide ecosystem classification and ecological interpretations.

“Ecosystem management is place-based and the boundaries of
the place of concern must be clearly and formally defined.”

“A good understanding of a site’s ecological conditions, the relationship amongst different sites, and the response of those sites to disturbance and time is an important aspect of resource management.” source

So what exactly is an afforestation area?  As is the case with the afforestation areas existing at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the “George Genereux” Urban Regional park?

“Afforestation is the establishment of a forest or stand of trees (forestation) in an area where there was no previous tree cover.  Many government and non-governmental organizations directly engage in programs of afforestation to create forests, increase carbon capture and carbon sequestration, and help to anthropogenically improve biodiversity.”

“Reforestation is the natural or intentional restocking of existing forests and woodlands (forestation) that have been depleted, usually through deforestation. Reforestation can be used to rectify or improve the quality of human life by soaking up pollution and dust from the air, rebuild natural habitats and ecosystems, mitigate global warming since forests facilitate biosequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and harvest for resources, particularly timber, but also non-timber forest products.”

“A similar concept, afforestation, another type of forestation, refers to the process of restoring and recreating areas of woodlands or forests that may have existed long ago but were deforested or otherwise removed at some point in the past or lacked it naturally (e.g., natural grasslands). Sometimes the term “re-afforestation” is used to distinguish between the original forest cover and the later re-growth of forest to an area. Special tools, e.g. tree planting bars, are used to make planting of trees easier and faster.”

“Deforestation, clearance, or clearing is the removal of a forest or stand of trees where the land is thereafter converted to a non-forest use. Examples of deforestation include conversion of forestland to farms, ranches, or urban use.”  “Deforestation imbalances the balance of natural climate which lead to the global warming by increasing the CO2 and decreasing the O2 percentage all across the world.”

“Outside of combat, war efforts had other ecological impacts.  European wheat demand in World War I led to the plowing up of about 6 million hectares of grasslands on the American High Plains and in Canada’s Prairie Provinces.  This helped prepare the way for the dust bowl of the 1930s.  The British War effort in World War II consumed about half of Britain’s forests.  …Frantic drives to raise production of food, fuel, minerals, and other resources led to sharp ecological disruptions in every combatant nation, as did crash road- and railroad- building efforts.” J.R. McNeill; Ideas Matter: A Political History of the Twentieth Century Environment.

“The Last Best West” was the campaign was operated by the Minister of the Interior Clifford Sifton, appointed by Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier to oversee settlement of the west.  “Between 1891 and 1914, more than three million people came to Canada, largely from continental Europe, following the path of the newly constructed continental railway.” During this settlement period under the Dominion Lands Act, how many acres were deforested across Saskatchewan?

How many trees deforested during the homestead and immigration area were re-forested?  How many trees deforested to grow Wheat crops for the war effort were re-forested?  Current practices enumerate reforestation methods used in contemporary times, however when Richard St. Barbe Baker worked in the logging camp near Big River, what were the reforestation practices of that era?  Have these trees been re-forested?  Besides carbon sequestration, and the life giving properties of trees, is not history, also, another good reason for creating more afforestation areas?

“The use of afforestation as strategy of conservation of forest biomes is seen as a menace to the conservation of natural grassland and savanna biomes, as the ideal would be the reforestation of areas where forest occurs naturally.”  The trees afforested in Saskatoon were drought resistant species, inclusive of native tree plantings, as well as introduced trees.  With the evolution of the eco-system since 1972 when the afforestation areas were started as tree nurseries, the natural biome of the Saskatoon Plain region in the Moist Mixed Grassland Eco-region is re-asserting itself.

In 1972, Manchurian Elm, and American Elm were afforested, along with hardy drought resistant tree species such as Colorado Blue Spruce, Balsam-poplar, Scotch Pine, and Caragana. If Green Ash, Manitoba Maple or Willow were planted, there was not a large survival rate of these in the afforestation area. Native prairie Trembling Aspen Groves, roses, buffaloberry, and snowberry are mixed within the afforested woodlands.

The City of Saskatoon is fortunate in being a river city, encompassing the South Saskatchewan River.

“Each of the forest type and wetland keys associated with the ecozones uses three primary features to distinguish the most likely ecosite: 1) abiotic condition (e.g. , moisture regime), 2) plant species present on the site, and 3) cover values associated with the plant species. The abiotic condition assessment identified in the keys is primarily used to distinguish between wetland and terrestrial conditions. It relies on the identification of:
  • Depth of organic material,
  • Depth to water table,
  • Permanently frozen condition, and
  • Moisture regime.” source

 

Aspen Parkland  makes up the natural vegetation around Saskatoon sccording to J. Thorpe (Atlas of Saskatchewan Millenium Edition).  The Aspen Parkland features a gradation between grasslands and wooded landscapes.  The predominant woodlands feature Trembling Aspen stands with “Snowberry (Synphoricarpos spp.), rose (Rosa spp), saskatoon (Amelanchier alnifolia), chokecherry (Prunus virginia) and a variety of Herbs” Balsam Poplar (Populus balsamifera) are interspersed with “eastern” hardwoods, green ash, Manitoba Maple, American Elm, and plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides var. occidentalis).

Saskatoon belongs to the Moist Mixed Grassland Eco-region most specifically, the Saskatoon Plain.  The afforestation areas reside within the West Swale, a wetlands area and a part of the South Saskatchewan River watershed.  The north end of Chappell Marsh, a permanent wetlands, is an invaluable habitat for waterfowl.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Afforestation; City Honoured as Pioneer

It is wonderful to be part of the City of Saskatoon, a city that at once is a pioneer in the world afforestation efforts. Saskatoon, was way ahead of the times in 1972.  The parks department showed incredible foresight by implementing this “Green Survival” programme as it was called in its inception.

 

“We’ve got to realize we live in a biosphere.  When the trees go, the people go.  It’s a question of survival now.  We’ve got to plant trees within the  next 10 years to save our lives.  We’ve been eating into our forest cover faster in the last 50 years than ever.  If we want to enter the new century with forests, we will have to start planting trees for our lives now.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker reported by Zeina Cleigh.  Tribune Staff Writer.

‘Afforestation’ is the establishment of a forest or stand of trees (forestation) in an area where there was no previous tree cover.

‘Deforestation’ which means cutting of forests or trees.

‘Reforestation’ is the natural or intentional restocking of existing forests and woodlands (forestation) that have been depleted, usually through deforestation.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area was planted by the City of Saskatoon parks department in 1972.  The three afforestation areas, 660 acres, were preserved in perpetuity that same year by City Council.

Wayne Buckle, a tree planter in that year, says ” I have always enjoyed travelling over the train overpass on Highway 7 to watch my forest grow – that’s probably the best vantage point to view it” ~ Leslee Newman

Paul Hanley also wrote the best selling book Eleven speaking the time when the planet reaches Eleven billion people ~ echoing the following sentiments of Richard St. Barbe Baker.  What are the choices facing this  generation for the future survival of our planet?

A few of the many and several articles written about afforestation and the benefits to the planet are; Afforestation and Reforestation for Climate Change   and Climate change mitigation through afforestation / reforestation These, of course, are just two of over 1,510,000 scientific articles on the importance and value of afforestation to mitigate climate change.

Will the human race fail, fizzle, give out, go out, peter out, run out, break, break down, collapse, conk (out), crash, cut out, die, expire, stall, stop, run down, wane?

It is up to you, personally, to help your grandchildren and all of  humanity to hold out, hold up, keep up, last, prevail, bear up, carry on, cope, endure, fare, get along, get by, get on, go, hang in, make out, manage, persevere, abide, continue, draw out, hang on, hold on, linger, persist, remain, run on.

What can you do?

  1. Plant a tree, nay plant ten trees a year as requested by St. Barbe.
  2. Support afforestation efforts around the world.
  3. Care for trees everywhere.
  4. Do a good deed.
  5. Read Eleven, and the need to become a Sylvan economy as requested by St. Barbe

It is wonderful to be part of the City of Saskatoon, a city that at once is a pioneer in the world afforestation efforts. Saskatoon, was way ahead of the times in 1972.  The parks department showed incredible foresight by implementing this “Green Survival” programme as it was called in its inception.

Paul Hanley, a personal friend of St. Barbe, a freelance writer, and environmentalist,  has written a biography on this internationally known forester, Richard St. Barbe Baker.  Contact Paul Hanley for more information about this book in order to learn more about the afforestation area namesake, Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***