Pollinator Paradise YXE

Wild About Saskatoon has started a programme called Pollinator Paradise YXE.

What do you think of a 175,218 square meter allocation for a YXE pollinator paradise?

For an urban city like Saskatoon planning to meet one million residents by 2063, it is wise to show environmental leadership. The City of Saskatoon cannot do it alone, residents have to come to the forefront to help with pollinator garden planting.

Wild About Saskatoon mentions that “the first 50 people to certify your back yard, garden, or school yard as a Pollinator Paradise will receive our beautiful Pollinator Paradise YXE sign (retail value $39.95) for free.”

Share the Wild About Saskatoon Facebook Posts

Fill out the form regarding Pollinator Paradise Certification

There is more information and YouTube videos on Pollinator Paradise YXE.

Query? Should there be pollinator gardens planted in the two afforestation areas by making use of the Utility Right-Of-Ways? What would it mean? Checking out the ROW zones of the afforestation areas on Google Earth there would be:

There is the potential for a whopping 141,536 square meters of pollinator gardens at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

AND

There is also potential for another 33,682 square metes of pollinator gardens at George Genereux Urban Regional Park

AND it would mean invasive species would be much much easier to keep in check, and the cost of maintenance would go way way down, and the numbers of pollinators would be greatly benefited by a total of 175,218 square meters of pollinator gardens. Well, part of it could be food forests if low growing berry bushes were planted in the boundary zone, and pollinator gardens in the wire zone of the right of ways.

What do you think? Is 175,218 square meters of pollinator paradise something which would show good environmental and pollinator-friendly management practices? Is it a good idea?

Already from the closure of the east side of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area to motorized vehicular traffic, the number of native plants is exponentially increasing without motorized vehicles using the urban regional park as a road bringing in invasive plants from everywhere. There is starting to be a rebound with an increase in native plants, and numbers of species already – without an anthropogenic management plan, just letting Mother Nature do the native flora plantings!

There are a few more resources included as follows:

Managing Rights of Way ROW for Pollinators: A practical Guide for Managers

Monarch Butterfly Milkweed Garden 101

Pollinators and Rights-Of-Way Integrated Vegetation Management – How to Build a Pollinator Eco-system

Increasing Seed of Wildflowers Valuable to Pollinators

Bee ID Guide

Roadside Vegetation and Rights of Way The Ohio State University

NAPPC Plight of the Pollinator Maintaining ROW Access and Pollinator Access North American Pollinator Protection Campaign

Interseeding Wildflowers to Diversify Grasslands for Pollinators

Build a Bee Condo

Pollinator Corridors under power lines BC Hydro Power Smart Prepare and Submit a ROW proposal

5 Things kinds can do to Help Pollinators

Bumble Bee Conservation A pamphlet

Gardening for Pollinators U.S. Forest Service

Landscaping for Pollinators. Small Scale…Large Scale… Penn State Department of Entomology

Buying Bee-Safe Plants

Habitat Highways National Wildlife Federation

Pollinator Puzzle

Pollinator Habitat Scorecard

Roadsides and Rights-of-Ways Minnesota Department of Agriculture

Pollinators and Roadsides: Best management practices for Managers and Decision Makers

Xerces Society Native Thistle Conservation Guide

Rethinking Rights of Way Landscapes to benefit pollinator species Science Borealis

Nesting Resources for Pollinator Habitats

Rights of Way, Roads and Pollinators Webinar

Pollinators Department of Highways Pollinator Friendly Practices and Information under FHWA

Who are the pollinators?

Lifelines YouTube Video Utility Rights of Way and pollinators

Mission Monarch

Pollinators and Roadsides – Linn County

Endangered Pollinators

Rights of Way Habitat Restoration Program Canadian Wildlife Federation

How to Create a Pollinator-friendly garden David Suzuki Foundation

Canadian Chapter of the Rights-of-Way Habitat Working Group (ROWHWG) rownetwork@cwf-fcf.org

Bumble Bee Watch Download apps for iOS or Android.

Powerline Right-Of-Way management and flower-visiting insects: How vegetation management can promote pollinator diversity Scientific paper on journal PLOS One

Budburst: Budburst brings together researchers, horticulturists, and community scientists on a shared journey to uncover the stories of plants affected by human impacts on the environment. Budburst tells these stories through data collection, data sharing, education, and personal connections.

Catch the Buzz – Pollinator Habitat in Utility Rights-Of-Way Northern Arizona University

Find out what else you can do to help Bring Back the Pollinators.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Donate your vehicle to Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.  to raise funds for afforestation areas. Click here to find out more. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

The environment is where we all meet; where we all have a mutual interest; it is the one thing all of us share.

Lady Bird Johnson

Free Air-life

Friluftsliv, what does it mean? Friluftsliv, is a Swedish word which literally means free-airlife and generally refers to outdoor education and nature tourism. How do you experience free-airlife in an urban regional park open to the general public? How would you identify your outdoor experience?

The 6th International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitors in Recreational and Protected Areas ( MMV ) examined many co-existing and dispartate segments for greenspaces. The gamut ranged from the value of outdoor activities, the outdoor nature experience, health and wellness in nature, the visitor experience, recreational values, the carrying capacity of greenspaces, user and visitor monitoring, the impact of tourism, nature educational perspectives, protected areas, user behavior, management strategies, conservation, and sustainable development, children, conflicts, risk and safety, assessments and research.

How does an urban consumptive culture weigh in alongside intangible heritage assets. Is it feasible to acknowledge natural, man-made and spiritual heritage assets and their values? What is the same about heritage management, and nature conservation when it comes to interpreting value of place? What is the difference between assessment measures and the process implemented to rate the importance and value of features, and place identity? Should communities strive to identify resources, and to the identity of place of biodiversity in the grand scheme? What idealogy, and framework is used to ascertain the significance of the built and natural features, assets, and the total user package?

It is all a balancing act, a dance between the context and monitoring or experiences, attitudes, in the dynamic rhythm of time and space. It is the vulnerability of the semi-wilderness habitat amid the exponential increase of the anthropogenic footprint. Its the indicator of the natural capital asset valuation system contrasting and comparing native environments with cultural heritage.

Users, and site visitors come to the afforestation area with a wide variety of experience needs, wishes and demands all placed on the environment.

Natural features with important physical and biological formations
Geological and physiographical formations
Aesthetic resources: landscapes, forests, wetlands etc
Indigenous species
· Animals
· plants
· Non-living organisms
Exotic species creating the built heritage landscape
· Animals
· plants
· Non-living organisms
Systems of scientific importance
Conservation of natural beauty
Biodiversity
Geomorphological Diversity
Geological Diversity
Distinctive Ecosystems
Genetic Diversity
Indigenous Species
Natural Integrity
Ecosystems
Formations and Processes of Ecosystems
Evolution and Succession Processes
Typology

SHAPED NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
Parks and Gardens
Sacred Natural Wetlands Sites
Underwater Cultural Heritage
Humans in Nature
Outdoor Centres
Activity Centres
BUILT ENVIRONMENT
Trails
SW OLRA
Utilities
ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES AND MEMES
Archaeological Sites
Pleistocene Glacial Spillway
PLACES OF MEMORY
Old Bone Trail
Settlers and homesteaders
Biographies of namesakes
West Swale

(Chart adapted from Papathansiou-Zuhrt (2012))

Bibliography

Fredman, Peter, Marie Stenseke, Hanna LIljendahl, Anders Mossing and Daniel Laven. eds (2012) The 6th International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitors in Recreational and Protected Areas. (MMV) Outdoor Recreation in Change – Current Knowledge and Future Challenges. Stockholm, Sweden.

Papathansiou-Zuhrt, Dorothea. (2012) See TCP Sagittarius. Golden Bow: Teaching Modules. Development of Transnational Synergies for Sustainable Growth Areas. Updated Version 2012.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Afforestation

Download the Field Guide to the Ecosites of Saskatchewan’s Provincial Forests

What an amazing treasure written by M.S. McLaughlan, R.A. Wright and R.D. Jiricka for the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment to provide ecosystem classification and ecological interpretations.

“Ecosystem management is place-based and the boundaries of
the place of concern must be clearly and formally defined.”

“A good understanding of a site’s ecological conditions, the relationship amongst different sites, and the response of those sites to disturbance and time is an important aspect of resource management.” source

So what exactly is an afforestation area?  As is the case with the afforestation areas existing at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the “George Genereux” Urban Regional park?

“Afforestation is the establishment of a forest or stand of trees (forestation) in an area where there was no previous tree cover.  Many government and non-governmental organizations directly engage in programs of afforestation to create forests, increase carbon capture and carbon sequestration, and help to anthropogenically improve biodiversity.”

“Reforestation is the natural or intentional restocking of existing forests and woodlands (forestation) that have been depleted, usually through deforestation. Reforestation can be used to rectify or improve the quality of human life by soaking up pollution and dust from the air, rebuild natural habitats and ecosystems, mitigate global warming since forests facilitate biosequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and harvest for resources, particularly timber, but also non-timber forest products.”

“A similar concept, afforestation, another type of forestation, refers to the process of restoring and recreating areas of woodlands or forests that may have existed long ago but were deforested or otherwise removed at some point in the past or lacked it naturally (e.g., natural grasslands). Sometimes the term “re-afforestation” is used to distinguish between the original forest cover and the later re-growth of forest to an area. Special tools, e.g. tree planting bars, are used to make planting of trees easier and faster.”

“Deforestation, clearance, or clearing is the removal of a forest or stand of trees where the land is thereafter converted to a non-forest use. Examples of deforestation include conversion of forestland to farms, ranches, or urban use.”  “Deforestation imbalances the balance of natural climate which lead to the global warming by increasing the CO2 and decreasing the O2 percentage all across the world.”

“Outside of combat, war efforts had other ecological impacts.  European wheat demand in World War I led to the plowing up of about 6 million hectares of grasslands on the American High Plains and in Canada’s Prairie Provinces.  This helped prepare the way for the dust bowl of the 1930s.  The British War effort in World War II consumed about half of Britain’s forests.  …Frantic drives to raise production of food, fuel, minerals, and other resources led to sharp ecological disruptions in every combatant nation, as did crash road- and railroad- building efforts.” J.R. McNeill; Ideas Matter: A Political History of the Twentieth Century Environment.

 

“The Last Best West” was the campaign was operated by the Minister of the Interior Clifford Sifton, appointed by Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier to oversee settlement of the west.  “Between 1891 and 1914, more than three million people came to Canada, largely from continental Europe, following the path of the newly constructed continental railway.” During this settlement period under the Dominion Lands Act, how many acres were deforested across Saskatchewan?

How many trees deforested during the homestead and immigration area were re-forested?  How many trees deforested to grow Wheat crops for the war effort were re-forested?  Current practices enumerate reforestation methods used in contemporary times, however when Richard St. Barbe Baker worked in the logging camp near Big River, what were the reforestation practices of that era?  Have these trees been re-forested?  Besides carbon sequestration, and the life giving properties of trees, is not history, also, another good reason for creating more afforestation areas?

“The use of afforestation as strategy of conservation of forest biomes is seen as a menace to the conservation of natural grassland and savanna biomes, as the ideal would be the reforestation of areas where forest occurs naturally.”  The trees afforested in Saskatoon were drought resistant species, inclusive of native tree plantings, as well as introduced trees.  With the evolution of the eco-system since 1972 when the afforestation areas were started as tree nurseries, the natural biome of the Saskatoon Plain region in the Moist Mixed Grassland Eco-region is re-asserting itself.

In 1972, Manchurian Elm, and American Elm were afforested, along with hardy drought resistant tree species such as Colorado Blue Spruce, Balsam-poplar, Scotch Pine, and Caragana. If Green Ash, Manitoba Maple or Willow were planted, there was not a large survival rate of these in the afforestation area. Native prairie Trembling Aspen Groves, roses, buffaloberry, and snowberry are mixed within the afforested woodlands.

The City of Saskatoon is fortunate in being a river city, encompassing the South Saskatchewan River.

“Each of the forest type and wetland keys associated with the ecozones uses three primary features to distinguish the most likely ecosite: 1) abiotic condition (e.g. , moisture regime), 2) plant species present on the site, and 3) cover values associated with the plant species. The abiotic condition assessment identified in the keys is primarily used to distinguish between wetland and terrestrial conditions. It relies on the identification of:
  • Depth of organic material,
  • Depth to water table,
  • Permanently frozen condition, and
  • Moisture regime.” source

 

Aspen Parkland  makes up the natural vegetation around Saskatoon sccording to J. Thorpe (Atlas of Saskatchewan Millenium Edition).  The Aspen Parkland features a gradation between grasslands and wooded landscapes.  The predominant woodlands feature Trembling Aspen stands with “Snowberry (Synphoricarpos spp.), rose (Rosa spp), saskatoon (Amelanchier alnifolia), chokecherry (Prunus virginia) and a variety of Herbs” Balsam Poplar (Populus balsamifera) are interspersed with “eastern” hardwoods, green ash, Manitoba Maple, American Elm, and plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides var. occidentalis).

Saskatoon belongs to the Moist Mixed Grassland Eco-region most specifically, the Saskatoon Plain.  The afforestation areas reside within the West Swale, a wetlands area and a part of the South Saskatchewan River watershed.  The north end of Chappell Marsh, a permanent wetlands, is an invaluable habitat for waterfowl.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

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“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker