Rime Ice landscapes

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Rime ice forms when super-cooled water liquid droplets freeze onto surfaces. Meteorologists distinguish between three basic types of ice forming on vertical and horizontal surfaces by deposition of super-cooled water droplets. Of course there are also intermediate formations, whereas, hoar frost (refers to white ice crystals deposited on the ground or loosely attached to exposed objects, such as wires or leaves. They form on cold, clear nights when conditions are such that heat radiates out to the open air faster than it can be replaced from nearby sources, such as wind or warm objects. Under suitable circumstances, objects cool to below the frost point of the surrounding air, well below the freezing point of water. Such freezing may be promoted by effects such as flood frost or frost pocket. These occur when ground-level radiation losses cool air until it flows downhill and accumulates in pockets of very cold air in valleys and hollows. Hoar frost may freeze in such low-lying cold air even when the air temperature a few feet above ground is well above freezing.” according to Wikipedia

Weather Online UK states that, “Rime is denser and harder than hoar frost, but lighter, softer, and less transparent than glaze.”  This may be the reason why the last week’s winter wonderland did not behave like hoar frost.  If the tree branches were tapped, the “hoar frost” did not fall to the ground, the “rime” held on for six days.  On average, hoar frost will appear in the mornings, and usually disappear by noon when the wind picks up or the sun warms up the temperature of the air.

” Rime ice, formed from supercooled fog (water droplets that remain below freezing until they have a surface on which to freeze), is an accumulation of granular ice tufts on the windward side of exposed objects. These ice needles, about 2 inches (5 centimeters) long, point into the direction from which the wind was blowing during the fog…Generally the ‘feathers’ and ‘tails’ point into the wind, but under calm conditions the ‘needles’ might grow into every direction. This is why they can be mistaken as hoar frost. However, unlike hoar frost rime is formed by freezing fog or cloud droplets. ,” according to OpenSky which is the home for NCAR/UCAR research.  It is true that at the afforestation areas this past week, the trees were showing rime ice formed on the south east sides, which tells the tail that the wind was blowing from the south east during the last few foggy days!!!

The trees situated within the cover of the forest were not as heavily coated as those trees on the southeast perimeter.

Well, whatever the phenomenon, the last week was indeed spectacular with the rime ice on the trees!

Hoar Frost and Rime Ice What is the difference?
Here’s how a gorgeous display of rime ice coated Shenandoah National Park

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area 😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

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The stone and the worm

World Soil Day
5 December 2018

“As long as a soil is covered with forest, its humus is maintained. The basic forest problem lies in its composition and regeneration. In the forest the process of decay and growth always balance one another. The vegetable wastes together with the by-products of the animal population form a mixture on the forest floor. As we examine this mixture from time to time we  find it remains practically constant in depth, in spite of annual additions from leaf-fall that take place. This mixture is drawn upon at an even rate by earthworms, fungi and bacteria, and the resulting humus in turn is absorbed by the soil and provides the trees and under growth with the food materials they require. Thus the forest manures itself and with the help of the earthworms and other animal distributes this manure through the upper layers of the soil. Everything is done by Nature quietly and efficiently. No artificial fertilizers, no selective weed killers, no pesticides and no machinery are needed in the household of the natural forest.~Richard St. Barbe Baker My Life My Trees

“The great Empires of Assyria, Babylon, Carthage and Persia were destroyed by floods and deserts let loose in the wake of forest destruction. Erosion following forest destruction and soil depletion has been one of the most powerfully destructive forces in bringing about the downfall of civilizations and wiping out human existence from large tracts of the earths surface. Erosion does not march with a blast of trumpets or the beating of drums, but its tactics are more subtle, more sinister.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker- I Planted Trees – 1944

“The worm is the best farm worker. Darwin told us all there was to know about the life history of the worm. But what he didn’t teach us is how to harness the worm. And this I’ve been trying to do for the past forty years. To teach people how to use the worm on their farms and in their gardens by helping them to increase the humus, aerate the soil. And on the fringe of the Sahara and in Israel where I started planting trees over fifty years ago, we put a stone or a couple of stones for every tree on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho in our plantations in the Judean hills. And if a goat knocked a stone off, the tree would die.

“The stone is there to water the tree; this is what we call stone mulching or top mulching. The stone draws down the heat and it draws up the heat from below and draws up the moisture and will protect the worm. The worm will come up and down, and enjoy a cool night under the stone in the moisture that is accumulated under the stone. And in the morning the worm goes down again.

“If you pick up that stone you’ll see two or three worms just underneath, all in the cool and damp. But what is not generally understood is that you can’t have superphosphate and worms. The worms don’t like the superphosphate or any of the chemicals or weed killers and things you put on the crops now, these selective killers. You have to make up your mind whether you’re going to harness the worm or you’re going to work for the chemical merchant.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  ;-)re going to work for the chemical merchant.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

The Best Soil Worker

World Soil Day
5 December 2018

WorldSoilDayLogo

“As long as a soil is covered with forest, its humus is maintained. The basic forest problem lies in its composition and regeneration. In the forest the process of decay and growth always balance one another. The vegetable wastes together with the by-products of the animal population form a mixture on the forest floor. As we examine this mixture from time to time we find it remains practically constant in depth, in spite of annual additions from leaf-fall that take place. This mixture is drawn upon at an even rate by earthworms, fungi and bacteria, and the resulting humus in turn is absorbed by the soil and provides the trees and under growth with the food materials they require. Thus the forest manures itself and with the help of the earthworms and other animal distributes this manure through the upper layers of the soil. Everything is done by Nature quietly and efficiently. No artificial fertilizers, no selective weed killers, no pesticides and no machinery are needed in the household of the natural forest.~Richard St. Barbe Baker My Life My Trees

Are you planning to have an event on soils?

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Spread the word on the importance of soils using our campaign materials. Download posters, banners and logos in multiple languages.

“The worm is the best farm worker. Darwin told us all there was to know about the life history of the worm. But what he didn’t teach us is how to harness the worm. And this I’ve been trying to do for the past forty years. To teach people how to use the worm on their farms and in their gardens by helping them to increase the humus, aerate the soil. And on the fringe of the Sahara and in Israel where I started planting trees over fifty years ago, we put a stone or a couple of stones for every tree on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho in our plantations in the Judean hills. And if a goat knocked a stone off, the tree would die.

“The stone is there to water the tree; this is what we call stone mulching or top mulching. The stone draws down the heat and it draws up the heat from below and draws up the moisture and will protect the worm. The worm will come up and down, and enjoy a cool night under the stone in the moisture that is accumulated under the stone. And in the morning the worm goes down again.

“If you pick up that stone you’ll see two or three worms just underneath, all in the cool and damp. But what is not generally understood is that you can’t have superphosphate and worms. The worms don’t like the superphosphate or any of the chemicals or weed killers and things you put on the crops now, these selective killers. You have to make up your mind whether you’re going to harness the worm or you’re going to work for the chemical merchant.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

“It is not the land itself that constitutes the farmer’s wealth, but it is in the constituents of the soil, which serve for the nutrition of plants, that this wealth truly consists.”—Liebig.

Tree Dressing

Tree Dressing Day

first weekend of December.

December 1 & 2, 2018

 

National Tree Dressing Day honours the life-giving blessings of trees and is based upon an ancient custom. “Trees have long been celebrated for their spiritual significance. The simplicity of tying strips of cloth or yarn to a tree is universal and timeless. The old Celtic custom of tying cloth dipped in water from a holy well to a ‘clootie tree’ echoes the practice in Japan of decorating trees with strips of white paper, or tanzaku, bearing wishes and poems. The twenty-first century trend of ‘yarn bombing’ in Europe and North America transforms the local landscape with bright fabrics and yarns, like the Buddhist tradition of tying ribbons around the trunk of the Bodhi tree in homage to Buddha, or the annual Hindu festival of Raksha Bandhan when coloured strings are tied onto trees and plants to call upon the power of nature to protect loved ones.”  Source  It’s a way to say thank you to the trees in your community.

Trees have a way of bringing people together to celebrate a shared heritage. With over 80% of Canadians living in cities and towns, our urban forests are vital to our quality of life, and this recognition will go a long way toward ensuring that they continue to be planted and cared for in urban locations… For every person who stops and thinks about how they can help grow and maintain trees, Canada becomes a cleaner, better country.Cision Canada

In 1922, Richard St. Barbe Baker began the International Tree Foundation with Forest Guides, or Forest Scouts, called the Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees who… “promised before N’gai, the High God, that they would protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.”

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

“I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Rethinking Boundaries

“Rethinking Boundaries.

The issues of who owns what, and off site issues such as noise, have a huge impact on the way a site can work as a landscape.  The way in which a site has been defined should be kept in mind when any project starts…Our work, more often than note, is about how people use spaces, how they live in  places, what they do, how they walk, dance, play, and rest.  Designing for people has the added benefit of empowering a proprietary population, people who will not only care about but care for the landscape.”  Ruddick, Margie.  Wild by Design.  Island Press.  Washington. 2016

Neault Road & the Afforestation Areas: The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans. (source and map page 26-27)  What is a rural commercial/industrial area?

“The Rural Commercial/Industrial category accommodates general commercial and industrial uses, including lightly-serviced industrial, storage, and commercial areas that require a large land base. This area shall be differentiated into Rural Commercial and Rural Industrial areas through future planning” Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan May 2017

 George Genereux Urban Regional Park is quarter section is 160 acres or one forth of a square mile which is a very very small amount of land in comparison to the massive number of sections under review and planning currently.(source and map page 26-27)

The land surrounding George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area) as previously mentioned is rural commercial/industrial area and takes up approximately 11 quarter sections of land (See map)- so how will the land planning affect the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area)? (source and map page 26-27)

How will the city of Saskatoon and greater metropolitan area tackle the particular benefits of the George Genereux urban regional park?  How will the George Genereux Urban Regional Park be preserved in perpetuity, as per the 1972 proclamation by the City of Saskatoon during this next phase of expansion?  As the population of the greater metropolitan area designs ever increasing land masses for commercial, industrial, and residential, where sill the quarter section of land afforested end up?

Did you know that trees, forests, and afforestation areas do help protect you from carcinogens!!!!  So in the middle of a rural commercial/industrial area, the George Genereux Urban Regional Park would mitigate harmful emissions which arise from rural industrial activities.  As rural and urban residents the information from long range planning provides a safer and healthier space for everyone to live and reside.  Building our urban forest is an amazing testament to both the city and the P4G planners.

“Our green space is more than just beautiful – it provides an abundance of ecological services. Purifying the air we breathe and the water in which we swim and drink are but a few examples. The cumulative benefits of these life-sustaining services provided by the urban canopy have been valued at more than $80-million annually. Ecological services such as these help to remediate some of the negative health effects brought on by industrial activities and the resulting pollution.  ”
Prevention as the cure: How trees help protect you from carcinogens

Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authority (SREDA).  The P4G meets in the effort to expand the city of Saskatoon, and surrounding environs to  between 273,000 and 301,000 by 2020; 302,000 and 349,000 by 2025; 333,000 and 405,000 by 2030; and between 368,000 and 470,000 by 2035.  (source) As a matter of fact Saskatoon eyes 1M population in 50 years.

“The prescription for this new global market economy is to rob federal governments of all legitimate roles in setting standards, whether for the health of the people or the environment. Deregulation and decentralization become dominant policy since all regulations are viewed as violations of the freedom of the market. Laws protecting wildlife, natural resources like forests, or for that matter, the quality of air, water and soil, or the integrity of biodiversity, are viewed as unacceptable obstacles in the part of the market’s role in mediating all matters. Still another aspect of the new global order is privatization. The private sector is to be trusted to apply the laws of the marketplace to all matters social and environmental. The test for response to toxins in our environment is to measure the harm of continued use against the alleged greater economic harm of a ban, even if the substance is a carcinogen, the benefits being easier to quantify than the harm, when it involves human pain and suffering. ” Knelman, F.H. , Ph.D.  The Sociology of Health The Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine Vol. 11, 3rd Quarter 1996 

 

 

“The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“what we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another” Mahatma Gandhi.

YXE Green Strategy

The city of Saskatoon cares about the environment.  The YXEGreenStrategy began in the spring of 2018 allocating the City’s existing green spaces into a baseline inventory.  Read the report conclusion from the previous public engagement meeting.

A Green Strategy public meeting came together to develop Saskatoon’s Natural Area Standards; such as considering new neighbourhoodspark development, specifications as well as to update the Urban Forestry Management Plan, naturalized area policies (protected lands and wetlands policy), and to update the City of Saskatoon Official Community Plan (Community Plans & Strategies)

The City of Saskatoon Environmental Initiatives are many and diverse, the YXEGreenStrategy is one of them.  Of course the YXEGreenStrategy encompasses the
South Saskatchewan River watershed – source water protection plan, environmental grant, soil handling strategy, various community environmental programs, the rainfall report, and the northeast swale.

City planners, and civil engineers have it made when it comes to grey landscapes such as city infrastructure which includes both hard and soft infrastructure concerns. Hard infrastructure refers to the physical networks necessary for the functioning of a modern industry. This includes roads, bridges, railways, etc. Soft infrastructure refers to all the institutions that maintain the economic, health, social, and cultural standards of a country.  This includes educational programs, parks and recreational facilities, law enforcement agencies, and emergency services.  There are many manuals, and textbooks for the long range planners and engineer regarding city size and density and the recipe for how, when and where to create roads, parks, bridges follow contemporary patterns in planning.

When city planners have to incorporate municipal and naturalized reserves into the greenscape, this becomes challenging.  The laws and guidelines put forward by Canada Environment and Climate Change and the Honourable Minister of the Environment are followed by developers and city planners.  Saskatchewan’s provincial Ministry of the Environment is the next level of protection becoming more local in scope.  Then, of course are YXEGreenStrategy policies and procedures.

Can a forest, a wetlands, a natural grasslands, a ravine, a swale, be placed into a formula to determine when to bull doze the trees, when to fill in the wetlands, or when to place development upon a natural grasslands area.  Can general formulas and procedures be written for nature the same way that the length and width of road on primary and secondary access fit into a manual?

How have other cities managed?  For a short example in Canada;

City of Regina Open Space Manual

City of Edmonton The Way We Green: Environmental Strategic Plan

City of Vancouver Greenest City Action Plan

City of New Westminister Environmental Strategy and Action Plan (ESAP)

If you wish to learn more about the City of Saskatoon green strategy, you may subscribe for updates

How does this YXEGreenStrategy  affect the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional park?

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is listed in the City of Saskatoon Green Infrastructure Network baseline inventory, however George Genereux Urban Regional Park has been abandoned, neglected, and unlisted.

So, therefore, as a report card, to date the YXEGreenStrategy is only 1/2 successful, and only 1/2 committed.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉
.

Men of the Trees

Are you a Watu Wa Miti?

Natural Resources Canada has developed a Tree App just for you!

The My Tree app is a free download developed by the Canadian Forest Service, which will help you, as a property owner, to decide which trees will grow best in your region of Canada.  “The My Tree app now includes more than 180 native and introduced tree species and their colour-coded hardiness zones.”

 

You can download My Tree from the Government of Canada’s Mobile Centre for any operating system, or directly from the app stores for Blackberry, iOS (iPhone/iPod Touch and iPad), and Android.

Coincidentally, to go alongside the My Tree App download, you can request a free tree from the City of Saskatoon! as well, you can request a free seedling from SaskPower!

Are you able to also take the Watu wa Miti, or “Men of the Trees” oath? These forest guides, or forest scouts promised  that they would protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.  It is recognized that Women are at the heart of the Men of the Trees, and Richard St. Barbe Baker “found friendship and guidance from some key female collaborators and colleagues…  The International Tree Foundation empowers women to be bold for change.”

Native trees for the prairies include the following (as well as numerous shrubs and bushes):

  • balsam poplar
  • trembling aspen
  • green ash
  • lodgepole pine
  • white spruce source

“Of the earth’s thirty billion acres, already nine billion acres are desert. And if a man loses a third of his skin, he dies; plastic surgeons say “He’s had it.” And if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it dies. And if the earth loses one-third of its green mantle of trees, it will die. The water table will sink beyond recall and life on this planet will become impossible. It’s being skinned alive today. . .” Richard St. Barbe Baker

It is wonderful when the municipal or city government plants 1/3 of its acres to trees, it is remarkable when a provincial government department steps up to the plate and commits to planting trees around its province, and it is phenomenal when the country takes a stand to afforest their nation. Did you know Ontario has committed to planting 50 million trees in a densely populated province?  “Environment Canada recommends that a minimum of 30% forest cover and 10% forest interior habitat is needed to sustain the natural diversity of both plants and animals in a watershed, and that 75% of a stream length be naturally vegetated a minimum of 30 metres wide on both sides for these ecological features to perform their function.”Source  “In addition to enhancing the aesthetics of a property, the presence of trees and bushes provide a variety of benefits. For example, they clean the air and produce oxygen, they help stabilize the soil and prevent erosion, and they provide habitat and food for wildlife. “Environment, Energy and Transportation Statistics Division

That being said, what are you doing individually?  Have you planted 1/3 of your property to trees?  Have you requested that your landlord sets 1/3 of your condominium or apartment property as trees?  If not, why not?

Honour the International Tree Foundation’s forest scouts called Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees, and tale action.  This autumn, it is not too late to plant trees.  The ground is not frozen!  According to Trees Canada, “Deciduous trees can be planted … in the fall, from leaf-fall until freeze-up.  Evergreens can be planted.. in the fall, from about the first week of August to the end of October”.  “The fact is that for many plants fall it is actually THE BEST time to plant! It’s also a great time to get deals on perennials, trees, and shrubs too!”Source

Download the My Tree App, read Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s resource for planting new trees and shrubs and today request a free tree from the City of Saskatoon or request a free seedling from SaskPower!

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

“To be in a better position to help them I studied their language [Kenya’s Kikuyu people], their folklore and tribal customs, and was initiated into their secret society, an ancient institution which safeguarded the history of the past which was handed down by word of mouth through its members.

Soon I came to understand and love these people and wanted to be of service to them. They called me “Bwana M‘Kubwa,” meaning “Big Master,” but I said, “I am your M‘tumwe” (slave).” Richard St. Barbe Baker