Take a walk on the wild side.

Saskatoon’s Nature City Festival.

I Spy With My Wild Eye…

 

Join us for “The Wild Walk” Tuesday May 21 6:30 – 8:00 pm out at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  Join us in the South West Off Leash Recreation Area, and we will walk west out of the off leash dog park, and proceed to the wetlands, making observations as to the flora and fauna along the way.  Learn about Richard St. Barbe Baker along the way, who was the first honourary member of the World Wildlife Fund

 

Try “The Wild Spring Walk” on Thursday May 23 6:30 – 8:00 pm by venturing out to the George Genereux Urban Regional Park.  We will start west of the CNR overpass which crosses SK Hwy 7, and walk south and west through the woodlands searching out spring wildlife and emergent plants.

Remember tick season started in March of this year, so wear long pants, or insect repellant containing deet, or diatomaceous earth for protection.  We will walk along dirt trails, and abandoned roadways.

“The aim of the Men of the Trees is briefly  ‘ to develop a tree sense in every citizen, and to encourage all to plant, protect and love their native trees; for forestry is among the oldest and most honourable of the peaceful arts of men, and in its practice is unselfish and constructive service.’ ”
In the words of Henry van Dyke, America’s greatest tree poet,
He that planteth a tree is a servant of God;
He provideth a kindness for many generations
And faces that he hath not seen shall bless him.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should go towards  the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

 

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Look deep into nature

Evolution is a tightly coupled dance, with life and the material environment as partners. From the dance emerges the entity Gaia.
James Lovelock

A forest ecology is a delicate one. If the forest perishes, its fauna may go with it. The athshean word for world is also the word for forest.

Ursula K. Le Guin

Since 1970, Earth Day supports environmental protection,  and was supported by the  2016 acknowledging the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference historic draft climate protection treaty.  Earth Day was first celebrated on the first day of spring (northern hemisphere) March 21, 1970, however, United States Senator Gaylord Nelson initiated Earth Day on April 22 in America.  March for Science is also commemorated April 22, and the People’s Climate Mobilization follows on April 29.

“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”-John Muir

Paul D. Tinari organized Canada’s Earth Day September 11, 1980 during Earth Day Week beginning Sept 6, 1980.

Trees have a way of bringing people together to celebrate a shared heritage. With over 80% of Canadians living in cities and towns, our urban forests are vital to our quality of life, and this recognition will go a long way toward ensuring that they continue to be planted and cared for in urban locations… For every person who stops and thinks about how they can help grow and maintain trees, Canada becomes a cleaner, better country.Cision Canada

The United Nations celebrates International Mother Earth Day on April 22 “to remind each of us that the Earth and its Ecosystems provide us with life and sustenance….The Earth and its ecosystems are our home. In order to achieve a just balance among the economic, social, and environmental needs of present and future generations, it is necessary to promote harmony with nature and the Earth.”

“Look deep into nature and you will understand everything better.”-Einstein

in 1922, Richard St. Barbe Baker began the International Tree Foundation with Forest Guides, or Forest Scouts, called the Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees who… “promised before N’gai, the High God, that they would protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.”

“Earth laughs in flowers.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Deep roots: British forester’s love of trees fostered early environmental movement

Deep roots

British forester’s love of trees fostered early environmental movement

Richard St Barbe Baker photo

University of Saskatchewan Library,

University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds

“Last year, in the Jeff McKay film Call of the Forest, Ontario botanist Diana Beresford-Kroeger asked viewers to “pledge to plant one native tree each year for six years to help save our planet.”

Last month, in a video that featured actor Alec Baldwin, conservationist Jane Goodall said conserving forests and replanting trees is “one-third of the solution to climate change.”

But read Man of the Trees, Saskatoon author Paul Hanley’s new biography of British forester, conservationist and author Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), and it becomes clear these ideas are not new.”

Read more…

Gordon, Ariel. British forester’s love of trees fostered early environmental movement

Winnipeg Free Press.  October 20 2018

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Man of the Trees. Richard St. Barbe Baker, the First Global Conservationist. By Paul Hanley Foreword by HRH The Prince of Wales Introduction by Jane Goodall

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

Winter Birds

Feed the Birds Day.
February 3

This day is celebrated when the winter is coldest, and the winter snow has set in to encourage feeding of birds outside. In these colder winter months, the birds are in need of energy, and food is scarce as cold weather progresses.

There are a few methods to feed birds, which is not too overwhelming.  One is feeding them from your hands, another is to plant suitable trees and shrubbery and finally set out a do it yourself feeder designed in a multitude of fashions, or store bought. How to choose the right kind of bird feeder is an important consideration for the types of birds in your habitat.

How do you know what are the types of birds in your particular neck of the woods? Checking out Habisask (Hunting, Angling and Biodiversity Information of Saskatchewan) is an online species mapping application showing historical data. Another resource is Saskatchewan E-bird, the E-bird hotspots map or check out common migratory patterns, and dates for typical observation times for species in your area.

If you set out a feeder in the winter months, it is imperative to check it regularly. The birds’ very survival rely on this source of food once they get used to it being there.

A very simple, and spontaneous bird feeder is to strew along the top of horizontal tree branches fruit, suet, wheat, corn, sunflowers, sand, grit or store bought bird food for wild birds.

Richard St. Barbe Baker founded the “Men of the Trees” international foundation which is now known as the International Tree Foundation has three tenets for followers;

  • protect the native forest
  • plant ten native trees each year
  • take care of trees everywhere

For those choosing to follow in the footsteps of Richard St. Barbe Baker, and plant trees, select for “Feed the Birds Day” those plants which will best supply the seeds and nutrients the local birds need. The Land Manager’s Guide to Grassland Birds of Saskatchewan provides a template of birds and what types of food they require.

Another very important task to investigate is to search out anything in the wetlands or urban regional park which harm the bird’s environment. The landscape and the native flora can be harmed by chemicals spilled, oils, or any other wastes which don’t belong in a wetland and riparian forest ecosystem. By removing harmful contaminant, those birds feeding naturally in their native spaces are protected by your conservation efforts.

So, step up, and do your part during Feed the Birds Day this Februrary 3!  Attached are some links so this task is not overwhelming, but is enjoyable, and quite rewarding. Feed the birds not only today, but everyday, and get to know your feathered friends.

He that planteth a tree is a Servant of God
He provideth a Kindness, for many generations
and faces he hath not seen shall bless him.
Who so walketh in solitude, And inhabiteth the wood,

Choosing light, wave, rock and bird.

Before the money-loving herd.
Unto that forester- shall pass,
From these companions, power and grace.

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Alger, Bonnie. Feed the Birds Day. Treehugger.

Banks, Shelley. Regina Backyard Birds: Finches, Sparrows, Siskins. Prairie Nature. April 2015.

Bird Feeding. Hinterland Who’s Who. HWW. Environment and Climate Change Canada & Canadian Wildlife Federation

Bird Watching in Saskatchewan Whatbird

Bradbury, Kate. Garden Birds and Feed the Birds Day. Wildlife Blog Gardener’s World.

Briere, Karen. Feeding Program helps birds endure tough winter. March 1994. Western Producer.

Bumstead, Pat. Its Feed the Birds Day Birds Calgary.

Byron, Greg. What should you put out to feed birds during the winter? Bird Canada. Jan 16, 2013

DIY Bird Feed. Living Naturally with Kids. Rainy Day Mum.

Feed the Birds Day Holiday Insights

Feed the Birds Day Video on The Guardian.

Feed the Birds Day. Gardeners Network.

Feeding Birds in Winter. Prairie Birder. November 9, 2012.

Flowers, Frankie. How to Attract Birds to your Garden in Winter. HOme and Garden. Canadian Living. 2017 TVA Group

How to Help Birds in Winter. How to Attract a Greater Variety of Foods. Wild Birds Unlimited. Saskatoon, SK.

How to choose the right kind of bird feeder. Cornell Lab of Ornithology. April 2009

Inviting Birds to your Garden. Landscapes Saskatchewan.

Land Manager’s Guide to Grassland Birds of Saskatchewan. [with Key Identification Features, Species Range Maps, Identification Charts, and Bird Diet] Saskatchewan Watershed Authority. formerly Saskatchewan Wetland Conservation Corporation. ISBN 1-896-793-29-0. Regina. Saskatchewan.

Nature Counts. A Partner of Avian Knowledge Network. Bird Studies Canada.

Porter, Diane. Bird Feeding in the Winter Birdwatching.com

The RSPB Feed the Birds Day The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

RSPB Feed the Birds Day. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

Saskatchewan Breeding Bird Atlas. Saskatchewan Conservation Data Centre.

Saskatchewan Breeding Bird Atlas. Bird Studies Canada, Saskatoon, SK

Saunders, Nick. Feeding the Wildlife at Pike Lake Saskatchewan Birds and Nature. November 2008

Your Winter Backyard Bird Guide Nature Conservancy of Canada.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“According to ancient mythology, trees were the first living things on earth. This is borne out by scientific reasoning which shows that it is through them that the air we breathe can give life to humanity. Through countless ages trees have been drawing carbonic acid gas from the atmosphere, absorbing and incorporating the carbon, assimilating it; then when they die, bequeathing to soil their carboniferous remains. The consequence has been that eventually the atmospheric oxygen was left sufficiently pure for the requirements of birds and mammals which have replaced the flying reptiles and monstrous amphibians that were able to endure the heavy air of primeval swamps and jungles.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Virtual Tour of George Genereux Urban Regional Park, a movie

Virtual Tour of George Genereux Urban Regional Park, Saskatoon,

a winter movie on You Tube

History of “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

133 Range Road 3063, Saskatoon, SK ( NE 21-36-6 W3)

Greenbelts were the brainchild of Ebenezer Howard, Rexford Tugwell and Benton McKaye. These greenbelts were pioneered to control urban growth.

Saskatoon had its own green belt envisioned by Bert Wellman, Saskatoon Planning Department, who literally got out of his office, and walked around Saskatoon’s perimeter in 1960 choosing high spots of land for scenic beauty according to Bill Delainey Saskatoon Historian and local history room librarian.Together with City Planner, Bill Graham, Wellman worked on parkways and planted trees for the Circle Drive Parkway at these sites purchased in 1960. The afforestation areas -Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park as well as several green spaces are a part of this concept, and have been incorporated into the Circle Drive plan as is evident around Gordie Howe Bridge completing the southern portion of Circle Drive in Saskatoon.

Green Survival: War Against Ecology Abuse is what Kathy Cronkite, Staff Reporter for the Saskatoon Star Phoenix called it on May 10, 1972.

The City of Saskatoon Parks and Recreation Board planted 200,000 trees on 600 acres of land as a tree nursery program in 1972 as part of the Green Survival Program sponsored in North America by the Canadian Nursery Trades Association and the American Association of Nurserymen. In total 355 acres of afforestation areas were planted that year. In 1973, 355  additional acres are planted. Originally 2,300 acres were envisioned.  Though, originally established as a tree nursery, George Genereux Urban Regional Park has trees too large to transplant at the current moment of time.

Future residential areas were examined, and the areas for public reserve allocated. The intent was to plant these future areas of open space so that when the subdivision was developed, the  Blairmore Suburban Development Area (SDA), there would be mature trees already established.

In 1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before council that these
afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity ~ this is approved by city council.

George Genereux Urban Regional Park, Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the third afforestation area south of Diefenbaker Park received plantings of drought resistant trees; black or balsam poplar also known as the balm of Gilead (Populus balsamifera), American Elm (Ulmus americana), Colorado blue spruce ( Picea pungens), Sibernain Elm (Ulmus pumila),  Scotch Pine or Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), Willow, Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo), Green  Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), and the Siberian peashrub or caragana (Caragana arborescens) Tree planting selections recommended by the P.F.R.A. Tree nursery at Indian Head, SK

The rows were planted by weaving in and out, deviating from the centre line by as much as  forty feet, producing a natural forest effect. “We’re stabilizing the sand with a series of spiral shelters – rows of trees planted in semicircles to catch the winds and create vortices of air,”  explains Richard St. Barbe Baker. “The same thing would be valuable on the Canadian prairies where straight  shelter belts cause snow to accumulate.” Star Weekly Toronto, On January 15 1972

In 1979, the parcel of land at NE 21-36-6 was named “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park – 133 Range Road 3063 and is now part of the Blairmore Suburban Development Area

The George Genereux Afforestation Area, besides providing flood mitigation control, and being an amazing carbon sink for the rising greenhouse gases, features an amazing geological history.  The West Swale, is an amazing geological remnant of the Pleistocene Yorath Island Spillway. The West Swale is a low-lying depression created by repeated glaciations and the melting of the last bit of glacial ice. When the glacial lake dam failed, a huge outburst flood (GLOF) occured The dam can consist of glacier ice or a terminal moraine. Failure can happen due to erosion, a buildup of water pressure, an avalanche of rock or heavy snow, an earthquake or cryoseism, volcanic eruptions under the ice, or if a large enough portion of a glacier breaks off and massively displaces the waters in a glacial lake at its base. Peak flows as high as 15,000 cubic metres per second. The northern flow of water in the Glacial North Saskatchewan River Valley was halted by ice, creating Glacial Rice Lake settling into the lowlands west of Grandora. Glacial Rice Lake drained by channels into the South Saskatchewan Valley According to Larry Edwin Hodgins, “The Moon Lake Channel, a major spillway connecting the North Saskatchewan River basin with the South Saskatchewan, and a smaller parallel channel, Yorath Island Channel, also cross the Cory plain….but they are clearly not South Saskatchewan channels.” and the area of the South Saskatchewan may have increased by 140% and 194%

George Genereux (March 1 1935- April 10, 1989) was a seventeen year old high school student in 1952 when he won the Olympic Games Gold Medal for trap-shooting at the Summer Olympc Games held in Helsinki, Finland with 192 out of 200. This was Canada’s first gold medal at the olympics since 1932. Further to this honour, Genereux was bestowed the Lou Marsh Trophy for being Canada’s outstanding amateur athlete of the year, making him the youngest person in history to receive this honour. The City of Saskatoon declared Genereux “Citizen of the Year” in 1952. Canada honoured him as male athlete of 1952. Genereux was installed in the Canada Sports Hall of Fame (1955), Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame on October 31 of 1966, inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame 1986 and the Trapshooting Hall of Fame (1986).

Genereux went on to trap shooting events across Canada and the United States. At the age of 13 Genereux won the Midwestern International Handicap Honours, then he acquired 3 successive Manitoba – Saskatchewan junior titles. (source) Genereux won the Junior Championship of North America at the Grand American Handicap, held in Vandalia, Ohio in 1951. During this event, Genereux broke 199 clay pigeons out of 200. Genereux also placed second in the Oslo, Norway World Championships, 1952.

Genereux, attended the University of Saskatchewan to earn his Arts and Sciences degree, then he went on the McGill University to study Medicine graduated 1960. Dr. George Genereux was for years a Professor of Radiology at the Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon.

The biography submitted to City Council stated that “It is considered appropriate to select in his honour this particular tract of semi-wilderness with its favorable habitat for wildlife of many kinds.” “If you can’t help yourself, you should use your God-given talents to help others,’ spoke George Genereux

Plans Around George Genereux Urban Regional Park Area

At the current moment, plans are made for the area surrounding George Genereux Urban Regional Park.  Check out the maps on these three proposals. The Saskatoon Provincial Freeway is being designed in the area west of Saskatchewan Highway 7.  The city of Saskatoon long range planners are designing the Blairmore Sector within city limits to the north of George Genereux Urban Regional Park.  The P4G planners are allocating land use outside city limits in the immediate vicinity of George Genereux Urban Regional Park.

Click here to see maps of the freeway route at the bottom of this story. On mobile? Click here

Provincial Government About the Saskatoon Freeway Project

Provincial Government Saskatoon Freeway

Saskatoon Freeway Presentation When fully developed, the Saskatoon Freeway will provide a high speed, free flow bypass route around Saskatoon for provincial traffic, as well as allowing for another commuter route for the growing city. The key benefits of the freeway include improved safety, improved traffic flow and reduced travel times.

CBC news Province establishes route for Saskatoon Freeway

CBC news Committee being formed to plan Saskatoon Freeway

CBC news Province picks preferred route for Saskatoon Freeway

CBC news Full route mapped out for proposed $2B Saskatoon freeway Bypass project not expected to start for years with no price tag attached
The bypass that one day is expected to route trucks around Saskatoon and reduce traffic in the city is essentially finalized.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Why We Love Forests (and You Should Too!)

What are a few of the benefits of afforestation areas?

Trees provide semi-wilderness wildlife habitats.   The very nature of the afforestation area helps wildlife and ecosystems to thrive and flourish. The mix of native and exotic trees provide animal homes and sanctuaries as well as food sources.

The afforestation areas play a huge role in mitigating the greenhouse effect.  Forests are carbon sinks, as they absorb Carbon Dioxide from the air, and replenish life giving oxygen.

Afforestation areas create a healthy environment in an urban environment.  City people can reconnect with nature and the outdoors, themselves becoming healthier and happier.  The entire city society benefits from this nature interconnectivity. Richard St. Barbe Baker spoke of spiritual renewal.  Urban city folks such as the Fatlanders Fat Tire Brigade can bicycle or off leash dog walkers can meander on trails enjoying recreational, tourism and educational activities.  Saskatoon Nature Society members ring birds and monitor bird counts, citizen scientists contribute to e-bird  and  i-naturalist Photographers capture the natural beauty and esthetics of the area.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Afforestation areas do protect land from soil erosion and flooding.  The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park are two of three afforestation areas in Saskatoon.  These two are located on the south west peri-urban area of the city and are in the West Swale locale.  The West Swale is subject to flooding and holding permanent and temporary wetlands as the Swale is a “low lying” area created from a major Pleistocene floodway channel. The West Swale is a striking geomorphological feature as it provides the historical evolution of the enormous events which happened during the culminating era of proglacial lakes and spillways which formed in central Saskatchewan.  A truly remarkable period in geological history.

Forests provide crucial services for human well-being and economic development. They provide food, freshwater and fuel, support soil formation, regulate floods, climate and diseases, and can fill educational, medicinal, aesthetic and spiritual needs. They stabilize ecosystems, play an integral part in the carbon cycle, support livelihoods, and supply other goods and services that drive sustainable growth. Yet, forests are under stress from overexploitation, pollution, population pressure and the expansion and intensification of agricultural practices. With the additional impacts of climate change, forests are further threatened, and these adverse events may further impact land quality – leading to biodiversity loss, food insecurity, increased pests, reduced availability of clean water and increased vulnerability to environmental changes.” Luc Bas, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) European Regional Office Director.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Vernal pools and forests

“American author Henry David Thoreau once described cities as places where millions of people are lonely together.  In a healthy city, this is not the case….Neighborhoods with parks, trees, cafes, shops and leisure facilities make city life healthy and enjoyable.”~ Lomberg, Michelle. Healthy Cities: improving urban lie.  ISBN-1-58340-359-0.  Smart Apple Media.  Minnesota.  1980.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park are both part of City of Saskatoon land bank, and are not a part of municipal reserve, natural space reserve, nor parks.  However both The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park are “preserved in perpetuity” as of the 1972 City Council approval for this request.

“When conserving wildlife habitat and water quality and protecting aquifer recharge areas are of greater concern, a forest protection strategy is advisable.”  Arendt, Randall.  Envisioning Better Communities.  Seeing more options, making wiser choices.   ISBN 978-1-932364-82-8 ISBN 978-1-932364-81-1. American Planning Association.  Planners Press.  Chicago 2010.

The West Swale waters flow from the North Saskatchewan River into the South Saskatchewan River, with its confluence at Yorath Island.  The Afforestation Areas benefit the drinking water extracted from the South Saskatchewan River.  The forests filter sediments, and pollutants, increasing water quality.

Forests are the most effective land cover for maintenance of water quality. They serve as natural sponges, collecting and filtering rainfall and releasing it slowly into streams. Forest cover has been directly linked to drinking water treatment costs – the more forest in a source water watershed, the lower the treatment costs. With an increase of urbanization, a forest serves to filter trap road contaminants, impervious pavement run off,  dissolved solids, pollution, and increases in sediment.

“Conserving Ephemeral Wetlands -Vernal Pools.  Vernal pools occur on land that ponds during the later winter and spring; they dry up by midsummer and remain dry for half the year.  The fact that these ponds do not remain wet year-round makes them environmentally very special, because they do not support fish populations, which would otherwise devour the egg masses(…with tadpoles emerging) that have been deposited in vernal pools by woodland amphibians such as salamanders, frogs and some toads.  It is important to protect not only these sanctuary pools but also the surrounding woodlands constituting the terrestrial habitat of species that begin their life cycles in these shallow water….Experts with trained eyes should be engaged to identify pool locations and estimate biological activity levels.”Arendt, Randall.  Envisioning Better Communities.  Seeing more options, making wiser choices.   ISBN 978-1-932364-82-8 ISBN 978-1-932364-81-1. American Planning Association.  Planners Press.  Chicago 2010.

West Swale and Richard St. Barbe Baker AFforestation Area wildlife Urban Forest Semi-Wilderness Area. Mountain Bluebird, White Tailed Deer Fawn. Barred Tiger Salamander or western tiger salamander. American Pelican, Mallard Duckling
West Swale and Richard St. Barbe Baker AFforestation Area wildlife Urban Forest Semi-Wilderness Area. Mountain Bluebird, White Tailed Deer Fawn. Barred Tiger Salamander or western tiger salamander. American Pelican, Mallard Duckling

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park are both considered wetlands by biologists. In both areas, it is great to detect and determine where the vernal pools are located, as well as the permanent wetland areas.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker