Saskatoon Nature Society

Wildlife Montage. Red Winged Blackbird, White Tailed Deer Fawn, Garter Snake, JackRabbit, Mallard Ducklings, Black Crowned Night Heron
Wildlife Montage. Red Winged Blackbird, White Tailed Deer Fawn, Garter Snake, JackRabbit, Mallard Ducklings, Black Crowned Night Heron

The Saskatoon Nature Society, and the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area are very proud that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is included in the new edition of their book, “Nature and Viewing Sites In and Around Saskatoon”. The public awareness of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, Saskatoon’s Best Kept Secret, is invaluable, and is currently the new direction forward being adopted by the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

“The Saskatoon Nature Society, a charitable organization founded in 1955, brings together those interested in the natural world. Our objective is to promote the appreciation of nature and encourage a deeper knowledge of it through observation and sharing of experience.

Our society supports nature conservation projects and is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats.The SNS is affiliated with Nature Saskatchewan and Nature Canada”SNS

A new direction has come forward for the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area; to tell the story of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area at the citizen level. Getting the story out there looks to embrace the single key concept which came forward time and time again during the meeting from all users and all stakeholders; the need to respect the Afforestation Area. 


In this regards, the Saskatoon Nature Society was way ahead in letting Saskatoon know about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area at the citizen level.  For this, the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area are deeply thankful and grateful.  It is good to know that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, an afforestation area preserved in perpetuity in 1972, is no longer an outlier nor secret, but is well and truly considered a nature and viewing site of some regard in Saskatoon.  If you have never had the chance to view the new edition of their book, “Nature and Viewing Sites In and Around Saskatoon” please do check it out, indeed.

 As the Persian Seer of the Bahai said:
‘This is the hour for the coming together, the Sons of Men.
That the Earth will become indeed a Garden of Paradise.”

I believe that this generation will either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilized world or it will be the first to have a vision, a daring and a greatness to say:

“I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life. I will play no part in this devastation of this land. I am destined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and of the generations of tomorrow.

Let TAWAMHWE-pull together-be our motto and …I pray that I may be just to the Earth below my feet, to my neighbour by my side and to the light which comes from above and within, and this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy for my having lived in it. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilized world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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Further Acknowledgements

‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the
land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the
generations of tomorrow.'” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Acknowledgements

It is a true honour and privilege to recognize the valuable contributions, time and efforts put forward by a number of concerned citizens in Saskatoon. There is no denial, that we acknowledged in 2016 those who started the journey as Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and now it is time in 2017, to again recognize the stakeholders who have a vested interest in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. It is fantastic to continue to again recognize and appreciate the support of the stakeholders and interested parties who came forward in 2016, the interested groups and individuals have evolved and overlap into 2017,  the support of all interested parties is truly appreciated.  The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is truly richer for their consideration and assistance. Commendations to these amazing people and groups who respect the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, groups and communities in 2016 and 2017 and those yet to come. In no particular order….

CarraganaFlower.JPG

The Montgomery Place Community Association are amazing stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Leslee Newman, President, and Trish Schmidt, Director, of the Montgomery Place Community Association, Ben Schmidt, Barb Riddle and all of its members have become stewards as well for the afforestation area, initializing the cleanup in 2015, and remaining on board to preserve the afforestation area, the ecology and wildlife habitat.

Jeff Hehn, Fatlanders FatTire Brigade (FFTB) Ambassador, and the members of this group are stewards acting in a protective service capacity educating the afforestation area community on security and safety and providing monitoring for a safe and secure area that the FFTB can bicycle in. The FFTB have also reached out to the community for “donations in kind” and engage in fund-raising for the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Trust Fund”, as well as offering their time in a volunteer capacity for the furtherance of the “Man of Trees“ winter trail network at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Ron, has continued his volunteer service to maintain the tracks and trails over the long winter months, providing a grooming service after the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is covered in a deep blanket of snow.

Constable Xiang community liason officer alongside officers of the Saskatoon City Police, have provided protective services to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The area is patrolled in person and by the air to mitigate illegal trespass.

Further to the protective services of the Saskatoon City Police, the Corman Park Police Service and the Sask Valley Regional RCMP Warman Detachment cluster have come out to provide protective services to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The combined efforts of these law enforcement personnel who are alert to the potential of crime provide a safe and vibrant community in the afforestation area. Citizens with such wonderful support are thus willing and able to look out for one another’s interests in the afforestation area.

The Meewasin Valley Authority as Stewards of the Saskatchewan River Valley have provided direction, and support in an enormous capacity as Verity Moore-Wright at the MVA has kindly partnered with the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area as financial stewards ensuring that all private and public donations to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Trust Fund MVA RSBBAA” serve to enhance and protect the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area environment.

Additionally, Renny Grilz of the Meewasin Valley Authority provides wisdom, direction and guidance to the Stewards as an ecologist who has manages conservation areas for biodiversity across the prairie provinces and has a specialization in native plants.

The Honourable Hilary Gough, city councillor for Ward 2 in Saskatoon met with stakeholders who have a vested interest in this area of Saskatoon. Hilary Gough takes this ecological area very seriously, and was grateful for the opportunity to listen, reflect, and consider the information coming forward from a diverse group of individuals joined to support the afforestation area which was protected in perpetuity.

The City of Saskatoon very kindly supported the previous clean up efforts, covering the enormous tipping fees, and the charge of securing a Loraas bin on site. Additionally, following the Committee meeting of July 2016 and the ensuing City Council meeting of August 2016, the City of Saskatoon kindly placed out a number of Jersey Barriers on site to mitigate vehicular traffic. The City of Saskatoon currently includes the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, the South West Off Leash Recreation Area in the ongoing South West Sector planning. The City of Saskatoon Urban Forestry Program undertook a tree inventory to determine the health of the forest, and future direction in regards to the woodlands. Further to this, the City of Saskatoon is currently undertaking a City wetlands inventory, as well as they are writing up a formal report for the South West Sector and the “master plan” of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Valerie Martz, President of the Saskatoon Nature Society is very proud that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is included in the new edition of their book, “Nature and Viewing Sites In and Around Saskatoon”. The public awareness of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, Saskatoon’s Best Kept Secret, is invaluable, and is currently the new direction forward being adopted by the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

The urban foresters of the SOS Elms Coalition, “Save our Saskatoon” Elms are engaged, active and concerned supporters of this urban forest of Saskatoon, the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Their wisdom, and combined practical experience in regards to how to respect the afforestation area are truly appreciated.

Rick Huziak, representing the Northeast Swale Watchers and Candace Savage, spokesperson for the North East Swale Watchers and co-founder of “Wild about Saskatoon” support the efforts to enhance the West Swale wetlands environment and the woodlands of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The Northeast Swale Watchers are truly examples to follow and as his Worship, City of Saskatoon Mayor Charlie Clark said “generations from now, people will be grateful for the environmental reserve designation, intended to increase protection of the swale.” The past experience of the Northeast Swale Watchers has been a guiding beacon for the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area when it comes to protecting the West Swale and the afforestation area.

Chelsey Skeoch, Watershed Education Coordinator, South Saskatchewan River Watershed Stewards are very receptive to also working alongside the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area in preserving and conserving the biodiversity and health of the eco-system and wetlands.

Barbara Hanbidge who has been Ducks Unlimited Area Biologist, Education Specialist and Saskatoon Area Manager for Ducks Unlimited is an informed and supportive stakeholder for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Ducks Unlimited owns and manages the Chappell Marsh Conservation Area directly south and across the street from the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The 148 acres of land at the Chappell Marsh Conservation Area has flourished under Ducks Unlimited growing into an outdoor classroom providing educational programming on conservation of prairie wetland habitat. Chappell Marsh is a Class IV permanent wetland with its southern extension in the Chappell Marsh Conservation Area, and straddling Cedar Villa Road, Chappell Marsh continues on north through the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area affording a prime and well-developed wetlands habitat with emergent vegetation which supports unique and varied waterfowl. On consideration of the northern portion of Chappell Marsh, it should be an honour to support the conservation efforts undertaken by Ducks Unlimited in the southern portion of Chappell Marsh. The waterfowl are unaware of the human arbitrary title and water designations, the waterfowl are relying on a secure water habitat for foraging and breeding.

The Honourable Sheri Benson, Member of Parliament for Saskatoon West was very engaged with the direction that the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area were taking. Sheri Benson offered to check into the availability of any support for the concerns raised to protect the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area at the Federal level.

Nicky Breckner, president of the Mount Royal Community Association was enthralled with the size of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. As a current off leash dog walker at the South West off leash recreation area, she was also very grateful that the City of Saskatoon was blessed with semi-wilderness habitat at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area and means to explore it further.

Megan Van Buskirk for the Saskatchewan Environmental Society realized that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, truly sounds like an important area to protect and was glad to network with the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Penny McKinlay & Andrew McKinlay of EcoFriendly Sask, dedicated to promoting and protecting our natural habitat, are proud to support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and continue to keep up to date with the progress being undertaken at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Ross Harwood president of Cedar Villa Estates (Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344) is very supportive of the positive changes occurring in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area.  Mandy Bellrose as the neighbourhood watch representative for Cedar Villa Estates regularly walks the adjacent Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area to build a safe and vibrant community and environment at the afforestation area. With an ebb and flow of information, communities, afforestation area users and law enforcement officials can work together for solutions in making the afforestation area a safe place to walk, to relax or to engage in recreational or environmental activities. “A trusted neighbour is one of the most effective crime prevention tools ever created. SPS

The afforestation area is truly built on the strength of its stewards and spokespersons. David Kirton, the City of Saskatoon Off Leash Recreation Area liason for the South West off leash recreation area also recognized the bonding between the City, the afforestation area and SW OLRA community to reduce and mitigate illegal trespass. This is probably one of the most significant things that the average citizen as part of the larger community can do to lessen the risks, it is through such empowered citizens that community efforts resonate with success in building a safe and vibrant afforestation and wetlands community.

The community of off leash dog walkers, have been very supportive of the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The individual casual off leash dog walkers are very appreciative of being offered the opportunity to walk their dogs off leash at the south west off leash recreation area, and do indeed come forward to volunteer, to clean up, to engage in conversation in support of the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The walkers of the SW OLRA recognize the name sake of Dr. Richard St. Barbe Baker, L.L.D, O.B.E. and time and time again, they are impressed with the forestry and humanitarian work accomplished by St. Barbe, and feel honoured to be a part of the afforestation experience with a chance to view the diverse biodiversity of the area.

Murray Gross, YWCA, and as the local Saskatoon communications officer for the international festival Jane’s Walk came out to observe the civic minded discussion put forward by the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Jane Jacobs, author and urban activist, who believed that communities should be planned for the people by the people. “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” ~Jane Jacobs

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints has been a powerful supporter of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Latter-day Saints missionaries serve in public affairs serving to build relationships with communities. The inspiration of the missionaries who came from across North America offering their time and talents made a dedicated commitment to come from across the land to meet in Saskatoon to offer compassionate service during the clean up effort. Thank you to the missionaries who provided to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area their multi-faceted humanitarian services.

Julia Adamson, resident of Meadowgreen, and SW off leash dog walker, SOS Elms Coalition, Saskatoon Nature Society, Nature Saskatchewan, Saskatoon Environmental Society and MVA partner as one of the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area came forward in January of 2015 to speak before City Council to save the forest and protect the environment in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area and its attendant West Swale Wetlands.  Adamson also raised clean up funds for the Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Trust Fund, and contributed time and energy to the 2016 clean up, and subsequent follow up endeavours.

Since this time the community efforts to protect and respect the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area for our children and grandchildren have resonated with the heart of Saskatoon. Every instance when visitors and residents of the City of Saskatoon come to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, they are amazed by the ecological bio-diversity, and appreciate seeing the biodiversity of the West Swale wetlands – the north end of Chappell Marsh and its associated tributaries and marshes- the Riparian woodlands, and the modified and native grasslands of the area. The various and diverse groups and stakeholders appreciate the co-ordinated approach being afforded by the City of Saskatoon, the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the Meewasin Valey Authority (MVA).

The Stewards previously acknowledged as well as these groups and individuals listed above have all united as a group – the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker – speaking up for positive change at the Richard St. Barbe Baker and embracing that the afforestation is preserved in perpetuity for the visitors and residents of the City of Saskatoon.

Saskatoon, truly shines with active groups and concerned citizens coming forward and taking action for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The response to the preservation and conservation efforts begun at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and West Swale have been very encouraging.

The next action plan is to network and connect with citizens of the City of Saskatoon about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, the concerns of the many and several stewards, and the method going forward is to encourage all users and visitors to have a deep and abiding respect for the afforestation area.

There has been an amazing community response from several community associations as they also respect and support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area; Montgomery Place Community Association, Parkridge, Fairhaven, Meadowgreen, Holiday Park, King George, Mount Royal, Dundonald Community Associations. The neighbouring rural areas in the Rural Municipality of Corman Park and residents of the hamlet of Cedar Villa Estates, also are very active and engaged stewards and stakeholders.

To everyone’s help, insight and knowledge, each word of wisdom, each hand offered to help is most graciously appreciated. It is with sincerest apologies if anyone has not been mentioned and their thoughts, insight and advice not noted at the website. Please drop us a line Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area if you have any further words of advice or concerns about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

So with the greatest of thanks to all of those, past, present and future, who have taken to heart the need to clean the afforestation area, to protect the rich bio-diversity of the eco-system, to sustain the environment at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation and who come together as a safe, rich and vibrant Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area community. Your further thoughts, words, and deeds are much appreciated. The afforestation area needs as many stewards to preserve and conserve this amazing site as is possible.

“If a man loses one-third of his skin he dies; if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it too dies. If the Earth is a ‘sentient being’, would it not be reasonable to expect that if it loses one-third of its trees and vegetable covering, it will also die? The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.

Of earth’s 30 billion acres, nine billion acres has already become desert. Ancient wisdom has taught that earth itself is a sentient being and feels the behaviour of man upon it I look at it in this way: If man loses 1/3 of his skin he dies; the plastic surgeons Say he has “had it”. It a tree loses 1/3. Of its bark, it dies. Ask a botanist or dendrologist, and he will confirm that, and I Submit that it the earth loses 1/3 of its natural tree cover it will die. When its green mantle of trees has been removed the spring water table sinks. Once the rhythm of the natural forest has been broken it is a difficult-and a lengthy operation-to restore it. Much as you may want to restore the indigenous tree cover immediately it may require a rotation of exotics as nurse trees. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilized world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of theland, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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A New Story Unfolds

“Landscape painting is the thoughtful and passionate representation of the physical conditions appointed for human existence. It imitates the aspects, and records the phenomena, of the visible things which are dangerous or beneficial to men; and displays the human methods of dealing with these, and of enjoying them or suffering from them, which are either exemplary or deserving of sympathetic contemplation.~John Ruskin”

A new story unfolds. At the meeting of Wednesday evening March 29, a group of interested stakeholders and stewards came together to discuss the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. It was appreciated that new faces were brought into the mix, and a new development unravelled.

Amid the conversation, a new strategy came forward by the councillor for Ward 2, Hilary Gough. This topic was to network and tell the story of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area at the citizen level. Getting the story out there looks to embrace the single key concept which came forward time and time again during the meeting from all users and all stakeholders; the need to respect the Afforestation Area.

Just as a painter, needs must, as they paint the landscape, choose; so too must a story teller choose. The painter can either show that which is dangerous to man, and relates the story of those suffering from that phenomena, or the painter shows that which is beneficial to man, and the painting’s story is told of people benefiting or taking enjoyment from the painting’s narrative.

As the several groups and people go forward from the meeting of Wednesday night, which story will they paint as they tell the story of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? Will all the individual painters network the tale which shows respect for the afforestation area? Pause a moment, consider truly, what words you choose to paint the picture you personally desire which show simply and easily this; a healthy respect of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  Pass this story forward.

As the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area reach out to those experienced in that art of “painting a picture”, it is amazing what is learned in the process. Study the City urban planning department plans, brochures and websites of the City of Saskatoon, Ducks Unlimited and the MVA where thoughtful planners examine the situation from many angles, and far reaching visions. Soon it is seen that a common theme comes forward. Lean towards that which is positive. Lean towards that which respects the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, mitigate that which does not show respect.

The City of Saskatoon is growing, expected to reach 250,000 by 2025 and a whopping 380,000 by 2035. Cities of this size have growing pains, and things may get complicated if there is no philosophy and no idea of where they are going.

There are undoubtedly challenges and opportunities along the path of getting to where we want to be. However where there are thoughtful planners who give time and consideration to a variety of aspects which are therefore seen on the brochures, facebook pages, websites and media conferences, everyone catches the spirit of where the planners are going and it is uplifting.  Readers feel good about the very words presented .

The meeting was an opportunity to hear the old story, the one that is being left behind. The old story shows no respect for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The meeting was an opportunity to replace problems with what feels good and what feels right. The various individuals present at the meeting spoke to methodologies and plans as to how to best respect the afforestation area in their group collective philosophies and desires as well as in their personal individual hopes and dreams.

By the simple act of respect, it is exhilarating to be in the afforestation area and look for positive aspects which fulfill everyone’s concepts of how best to respect the afforestation area. It is wonderful to make peace with opportunities for a thriving and healthy afforestation experience.

The City of Saskatoon report for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area from The Community Services Department supported a “strategic goal of quality of life” and the “strategic goal of environmental leadership.”

To turn back time to 1991, this very goal was conceptualized in a plan from the MVA to create wildlife habitat, complement and enhance the riverbank setting, and increase ecological diversity. A selection of flora species are selected and planted in patterns indigenous to the prairie/parkland eco-zone compatable with soil, drainage and topographic characteristics. Create a legacy of Richard St. Barbe Baker. The concept promotes all non-motorized activities, such as walking, cross-country skiing, bicycling, horseback riding, nature appreciation, environmental and outdoor education alongside scientific research [to paraphrase the plan].

Everyone plays a part in identifying a vision for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The vision provides the direction of growth and engagement by current and future visitors and users of the afforestation area. Everyone in the meeting was of a consensus that it is time to let go of the old drama which showed a lack of respect, and when at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area let go of the old story.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is not a baseball diamond nor basketball court with clearly defined painted lines and usage ~ the afforestation area is complicated. The afforestation area embraces a framework of diverse users who incorporate new and exciting methods to appreciate and respect the afforestation area. Side by side recreation groups sat beside planners, sat beside environmental and conservation groups, sat beside community associations, sat beside off leash recreation area users, and together everyone agreed and spoke in peace and harmony of the mutual desire to respect the afforestation area.

Creating a plan for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area identifies land use, servicing, transportation, alongside a visionary identification of possible uses while embracing the vision of Bert Wellman, Saskatoon Planning Department, and A.E. Ligtemoet, Saskatoon parks department. The afforestation area was conceptualized to enhance the City of Saskatoon as a green city. The parks department acted to preserve the afforestation area in perpetuity. Embracing a respect for the afforestation area fulfills both these early movements.

As users and stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, it is imperative to recognize our philosophy on a personal individual level. Lean towards that which is positive to embrace the respect of the afforestation area. A general meeting consensus was that it is truly time to make peace with where we are collectively and tell the new story, and find ways to leave the old story behind.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is being cared for by the MVA Stewards of the South Saskatchewan River Valley. The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is in the hands of urban city planners who also follow appropriate and correct processes to cover a wide gamut and variety of contingencies and identify a direction. Thank you to everyone who came to the meeting to hear the City of Saskatoon vision from Hilary Gough, Councillor of Ward 2, and together, now we can all rest in the knowledge that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and South West Sector future growth and plans will, indeed,  respect  the afforestation area.

PRAYER FOR THE TREES
We thank Thee God! for thy Trees,
Thou contest very near to us through thy Trees.
From them we have beauty, wisdom, love,
The air we breathe, the water we drink,
the food we eat and the strength.

Help us, Oh God!
to give our best to life
and leave the world
a little more beautiful and worthy
of having lived in it.

Prosper thou our planting
and establish thy kingdom of love
and understanding on the Earth.

~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Take a Walk in the Park Day March 30

On March 30, 2017 please celebrate “Take a Walk in the Park Day.” Before you head out, take a moment to plan a family activity to care for Canada’s rich biodiversity, and to increase the education and awareness of conservation, eco-systems, and Canada’s living resources.

Download a BioKit before going on your family outing at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. It is very fortunate that the BioKits are developed by the Biosphere, Environment Museum. These nature observation guides are designed for youth over six years old to become aware of the environment and natural treasures as you explore. the West Swale wetlands and associated riparian woodlands. Become immersed in the mysteries of nature, and take part in the activities outlined in the variety of Bio-Kits available.

“Biodiversity, or biological diversity, means the multitude of living beings, ecosystems and their interrelationships, in space and in time. It is divided into three components: genetic diversity, species diversity, and ecosystem diversity.”Source

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Bio Kit Activity Guide for Educators

Bio-Kit FAQ Government of Canada. About Environment and Climate Change. Canada Services. The Biosphere. BioKits. Explore the Bio-Kits. Pan-Canadian BioKits. Bio-Kit Frequently Asked Questions

Explore Canada The Great Trail PhoneApp

Nature Bio Kit Government of Canada. About Environment and Climate Change. Canada Services. The Biosphere. BioKits. Explore the Bio-Kits. Pan-Canadian BioKits. Nature BioKit

Trans Canada Trail Bio-Kit Government of Canada. About Environment and Climate Change. Canada Services. The Biosphere. BioKits. Explore the Bio-Kits. Pan-Canadian BioKits. Trans Canada Trail Bio-Kit.

Urban Bio Kit Government of Canada. About Environment and Climate Change. Canada Services. The Biosphere. BioKits. Explore the Bio-Kits. Pan-Canadian BioKits. Urban Bio Kit.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!

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If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
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I believe in oneness of mankind and of all living things and in the interdependence of each and all. I believe that unless we play fair to the Earth, we cannot exist physically on this planet. Unless we play fair to our neighbour, we cannot exist socially or internationally. Unless we play fair to better self, there is no individuality and no leadership. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Caring for a tree is caring of your soul.

The Athshean word for world is also the word for forest.

Woodlands Protection Installed.

Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center
Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the South west off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center

The trees in the afforestation area are being cared for! A simply fantastic development has occurred ~ the City of Saskatoon urban forest located between the Civic Operations Center (Bus Barns Construction site) and the South West off leash recreation area has motorized vehicle restrictions installed in the form of Jersey Barriers and locked gates.

What an amazing way to preserve and conserve the natural wildlife habitat corridor. What a wonderful way to inspire ethics and encourage others to tread lightly in the underbrush encourage the growth and development of the Colorado Blue Spruce saplings. This development encourages visitors to the afforestation area to be respectful of the treasure of this urban forest nestled in the City of Saskatoon. It is with pride that visitors can come to the City of Saskatoon afforestation area to behold the wonders of birds and the natural world.

Entering a protected afforestation area, the healthy biodiversity, hundreds of different and separate grasses and wildflower amid the shrubs and trees comprise the ecosystem. An ecosystem like no other in this Aspen Parkland of Saskatchewan. Within the city of Saskatoon, a wondrous delight to behold a mixed forest of Trembling Aspen Populus tremuloides, American Elm Ulmus americana, Colorado Blue Spruce Picea pungens, Scotch Pine Pinus sylvestris L, Willow Salix, Black Balsam Poplar Populus balsamifera, Snowberry Symphoricarpos albus, Honeysuckle Lonicera, Canada Buffaloberry Shepherdia canadensis growing in harmony and thriving. In Saskatchewan, native evergreens require a much higher elevation, so in the majority of open spaces and eco-zones in the Aspen Parkland, there are not the evergreens. The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) absolutely needs the woodlands to nest and roost set beside the wetlands for foraging. The evergreen pine needles are used to line the nests, which can start out 20 inches (50.8 cm) in diameter in the woodlands.

Depending upon the environmental condition, the flora and fauna varies in their display. It suffices to say the afforestation area west of the Civic Operations Center, east of the South West off leash recreation area with such vehicle barriers, and path use to mitigate the human eco-footprint will encourage this afforestation area to be a healthy and thriving eco-system.

Bylaw No. 7767 The Recreation Facilities and Parks Usage Bylaw, 1998 Codified to Bylaw 9377 May 24, 2016. This bylaw covers snowmobiles, city maintenance vehicles, and vehicles within city parks.

Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center
Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center

“Their life is mysterious, it is like a forest; from far off it seems a unity, it can be comprehended, described, but closer it begins to separate, to break into light and shadow, the density blinds one. Within there is no form, only prodigious detail that reaches everywhere: exotic sounds, spills of sunlight, foliage, fallen trees, small beasts that flee at the sound of a twig-snap, insects, silence, flowers.

And all of this, dependent, closely woven, all of it is deceiving. There are really two kinds of life. There is, as Viri says, the one people believe you are living, and there is the other. It is this other which causes the trouble, this other we long to see.”
― James Salter, Light Years

Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center
Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center

“A forest ecology is a delicate one. If the forest perishes, its fauna may go with it. The Athshean word for world is also the word for forest.”
― Ursula K. Le Guin, The Word for World is Forest

“Caring a tree is caring of your soul.”

“Planting a tree is the easiest way to align yourself with the cosmic rhythm.”

― Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being

Old Bone Trail

He’s fifteen miles from a neighbour And a hundred miles from a town

1925 Railway Map with Old Bone Trail - Goose Lake overlay
1925 Railway Map with Old Bone Trail (Goose Lake Trail) overlay

The Old Bone Trail, or Goose Lake Trail, was a vital connection in the late 1800s and early 1900s for bone collectors freighting their cargo and homestead settlers moving their effects south west of Saskatoon.  A rough estimate places about 10,000 settlers traveling along the Bone Trail in the early settlement years of Saskatoon 1904-1905. Saskatoon became a city on September in 1906 with a population of 4,500, by amalgamating Saskatoon, Riversdale and Nutana.

1924 Map with Goose Lake Trail or Old Bone Trail overlain

According to C. Howard Shillington, author of “Historic Land Trails of Saskatchewan”, the old Bone Trail passed west of Rosetown, proceeding along the northern edge of Eagle Creek until passing by the settlement of Harris. Crossing Eagle Creek, the Old Bone Trail passed near Tessier, Laura, and then traversed south east of Delisle. To the north east of Vanscoy, the trail veered off to reach the South Saskatchewan River shore line, following along the western shoreline of the river until it reached the Village of Saskatoon, currently the Central Business District of the city.

There are accounts of travelers in the North West Territories using the Old Bone Trail to access points just west of the Provisional District of Saskatchewan NWT to enter the Provisional District of Alberta NWT, but there is not at this time a recording of that specific routing.  The province of Saskatchewan was created in 1905, and before this time, the area the Old Bone Trail traversed was part of Rupert’s Land 1774 – 1870 and the North West Territories 1870 – 1905. For more information and maps

Early pioneers made use of the Old Bone Trail transporting buffalo bones to Saskatoon and “Pile o’Bones” (Regina) enroute to Minnesota. It was in the United States where the bones were ground down for fertilizer and used in the production of sugar. This thoroughfare was used in the late 1800s right up to the late 1880s when the decline of the bison brought the trade in bone for fertilizer came to an end. The “Métis hunters who once sought the living animals, went out to scavenge for their skeletons for shipment freighting them from Saskatoon to Minnesota. The hunters would haul them back by the cartload to the rail head at Saskatoon….it’s estimated that 3,000 carloads of bones went south from Saskatoon alone.”[Weber. 136]

After this time, the Old Bone Trail was used to transport settler’s effects between central Saskatchewan and points across the Alberta border. Describing the scene of 1906, “think of the Old Bone Trail, over which so many eager homesteaders poured that one newspaper reporter wrote it was ‘not an uncommon sight to see an almost unbroken line of wagons and vehicles of all kinds and degrees of richness strung out in a long, snakelike caravan many miles in length. At night around every slough, campfires blazed…'”[Weber. 131-136] Between 1908 and 1919, the Old Bone Trail was still used by those with horse and cart or driving their Model T fords, even though the rail line had come through.

The trails coming in to Saskatoon differed from the trails going out. R.C. Russell explains that early freighter trails saw heavily loaded carts with one man leading several units. The next animal was tied to the leading cart at the corner so that it would traverse in the ruts made by the wheels of the lead cart. The next animals in the freighter train, was likewise attached to the rear corner, and so on. The carts did not travel single file bit rather could make as many as sixteen ruts. In this way, ruts did not become too deep, catching the wheels on the hubs, or creating deep wet puddles during inclement weather. The trails made by wagons and buggies with settlers effects were different. These trails usually had the two wheel marks created by the buckboards, and the center path where the horse strode along.

“Away to the West! Westward Ho! Westward Ho!
Where over the prairies the summer winds blow.

The West for you Boys! where God has made room
For field and for city, for plough and for loom.
The West for you Girls! for our Canada deems
Love’s home better luck than a gold-seeker’s dreams.
Away! and your children shall bless you, for they
Shall rule o’er land fairer than Cahay.
~Marquis of Lorne, Governor-General. [Francis.85]

“Building on the romantic image of an Edenic West and the expansionist image of the West as the embodiment of national greatness and imperial grandeur, enthusiasts now created the image of the utopian West-the “promised land,” “the last best West” where the possibility still existed for immigrants to create a perfect society.”[Francis.86]

Rosetown received its name from the earliest settlers, James and Ann Rose. The Old Bone Trail extended south west out of Saskatoon to Rosetown, and further west there is less documentation. Rosetown was a bustling community in the early settlement era, as the Battleford Trail intersected The Old Bone Trail just west of town. Settlers arrived in 1905, the village of Rosetown incorporated August 29, 1909 when there was a population of 500 residents, and the 2011 census showed a population of 2,317. Rosetown locates 116.4 kilometers (72.3 miles)from Saskatoon

Pym set up as a rail siding along the rail between Rosetown and Zealandia. Pym is currently noted as an incorporated area located at latitude, longitude 51°35′ North and 107°52′ West or legal land location 23-30-14-W3 situated 9 km (5.6 mi) from Rosetown and 9 km from Zealandia. 107.4 kilometers (66.7 miles) from Saskatoon via Sk Hwy 7.

Traveling the Old Bone Trail, settlers arrived in Zealandia about 1904-1905. Though the trail was set north of Eagle Creek, the settlement became established to the south of the creek, and similarly the CNR rail set up south of Eagle Creek according to the 1925 Waghorn’s Guide Post Offices in Man. Sask. Alta. and West Ontario. This site was not named after a pioneer, but rather after the old country, as an early settler arrived from New Zealand. David McLennan, reports, that at its height, Zealandia reached 264 residents in 1911, and reported a population of 111 in 2006. 97.6 kilometers (60.6 miles) to reach Zealandia from Saskatoon on SK Hwy 7.

Brisbin, was a CN siding located at NE section 20 township 31 range 12 west of the third meridian. Located 8 kilometers (4.9 miles) from Zealandia, and 89.6 kilometers (55.7 miles) from Saskatoon via SK Hwy 7.

Crystal Beach, a regional park of former name Devil’s Lake was next along the rail. A popular resort until the lake dried up in the dirty thirties. Crystal Beach located at 33-32-11-W3 2 kilometers from Harris 84 kilometers (52 miles) from Saskatoon using SK Hwy 7.

As the Old Bone Trail still ambled along north of Eagle Creek, the settlement of Harris also had to cross the creek to use the trail for shipping bones, or picking up supplies. Once again, Harris was named after one of the original homesteaders, Richard Elford Harris who arrived in to stake a claim in 1904. The Canadian Northern Rail came through south of Eagle Creek and also south of the established post office and hamlet. The residents of Harris moved their settlement to be on the rail, and with an increase in population, incorporated as a village on August 10, 1909. In 1914 a media report of quartz near Harris, swamped the village with over 3,000 new comers trying their luck to locate rubies which turned out to be garnets. The 2006 census reported 187 residents still in Harris. 82 kilometers (51 miles) between Harris and Saskatoon on SK Hwy 7.

After Harris, Kinhop was a railway point or CN siding 3.7 kilometers (6 miles) out of Tessier and 72.5  kilometers (45 miles) from Saskatoon.

Winding your way north east on the Old Bone Trail, and south of the trail is Tessier. Tessier is a small hamlet on the rail line. 66.5 kilometers (41.3 miles) from Tessier to Saskatoon via SK Hwy 7.

Though Laura is the next stop on the rail, the Old Bone Trail, still traveling north of Eagle Creek is quite a distance now from Laura, as Eagle Creek veers on a more northerly route. It would be somewhere in this vicinity that the Old Bone Trail would have crossed Eagle Creek, as Eagle Creek winds its way towards Asquith, and went west of Kinley, and east of Rhyl and Juniata. Laura is still a hamlet located on SK Hwy 7, and was on the CNoR rail. 55 km (34 miles) via Sk Hwy 7 Laura to Saskatoon.

Delisle residents made use of the old Bone Trail making their way from Saskatoon out to their claims to start up their homestead in the “Last Best West.” The first settlers to the area near Delisle were the namesake, Mrs. Lenora DeLisle and her family arriving from North Dakota in 1903. The CNR came through in 1908, and the established businesses actually re-located onto the rail line as the settlement was south of the tracks. “The railways played an active role in promoting settlement of land”[Archer 140] Delisle incorporated as a village October 23, 1908, as a town November 1, 1913, and the 2011 census reported 975 residents. “On May 16, 1963, the last Saskatoon-Calgary passenger train went through Delisle after 54 years of operation.” [WDM] Delisle is about 45 kilometers (28 mi) southwest of the city of Saskatoon driving along SK Hwy 7.

Vanscoy, located on the CNoR marked where the Old Bone Trail began its routing to the South Saskatchewan River. The village enumerated 377 residents on the 2011 census. One of the early homesteaders reported by Bill Barry was Clinton Verne van Scoy. Barry goes on to record the post office location of Cubitt, SW of Vanscoy, and Quincy (formerly named Medona) to the north east. With the establishment of the post office in the larger settlement of Vanscoy, Quincy and Cubitt closed. 27.6 kilometers (17 miles) from Saskatoon.
Following the Old Bone Trail, the pioneer populated the various communities settling the homesteaders as can be seen from the dates provided above. “Transportation and communication have always been of special importance in Canada with its great distances and widely dispersed population.”Kerr
“On the distant lonely prairie,
In a little lonely shack,
New life the homesteader faces;
On the world he’s turned his back.

He’s fifteen miles from a neighbour
And a hundred miles from a town
There are rolling plains between them;
It is there he’s settled down.

In the midst of God’s great freedom,
Under skies of fairest blue,
He is building broad foundations
And a manhood strong and true.

With age-old wisdom behind him,
And spurred by his own great need,
Thus he builds his broad foundations
Free from custom and from creed.
~Margaret A. McLeod
[Francis 119]

Near highway 60 and the old provincial highway 7, is a marker commemorating the Old Bone Trail. At this site, rut marks from the Red River Carts can still be seen. The first provincial highway 7 was built on the square following the township and range lines created by the survey parties. It was not until around 1960 that the highway was straightened and became Saskatchewan Highway 7.

Following the trails created by the bison traversing the plains migrating with the seasons, the Red River Cart trails arose. “Buffalo trails, and therefore the trails of the people, connected hills to plains to river valleys within a shifting web of borders aligned with and expressing the limits of local economy.” [Herriot. 30] As was the custom, the Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) followed the old trail ways. By 1919, the CNoR was merged into the government railway; the Canadian National Railways (CN). The CN rails, train station, and Chappell yards are just to the north of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area, defining the northern perimeter of the urban regional park. Highway often ran parallel to the rail, following the grade created. The Old Bone Trail came east towards the South Saskatchewan River, and soon the CNoR ran parallel to the trail.

1924 Rand McNally Map close up of Tsp 36 Rge 6 W3
1924 Rand McNally Map close up of Tsp 36 Rge 6 W3 shewing afforestation areas overlay

To the west of Saskatoon, and Nutana were Cory, Farley and Eaton. Farley, a siding at NE 20-36-6-W3 situated on the Grand Trunk Pacific Line (GTP) line. As with the CNoR, the GTP soon came under the banner of the CNR by 1923. Cory was a Canadian Pacific Rail (CPR) siding at NW 29-36-6-W3. The name change of Eaton to Hawker CN siding NE 8-36-6-W3 was indeed confirmed by Bill Barry in Geographic Name sof Saskatchewan. In perspective, the afforestation areas are located at parts of SE 22 and 23 36-6-W3 and NE 21-36-6-W3 placing them directly west of Farley siding.

1925close-up-36-6-w3
1925 Railway Map Close up TSP 36 RGE 6 W3 with sections overlay

Though the City of Saskatoon has grown to encompass a large portion of land in the South West; in the early twentieth century, the Old Bone Trail travelers still had a few miles yet to go from Tsp 36 6 W3 to reach the village of Saskatoon as can be seen in the close up maps. The population of Saskatoon in 2011 was 222,189, and by 2023, the city is preparing for a quarter of a million residents a far cry from the 4,500 residents of the newly formed city of Saskatoon in 1906. Hearken to the words from the Saskatoon Board of Trade in 1911, “Admitting the general development of a city and its district to be in proportion to the demonstrated value of the latter’s natural resources; admitting also that the greater these resources, the swifter such development; ` and further, agreeing that development involves population which in turn means business, does it not follow that any centre of supply ` such as Saskatoon – should recommend itself for the establishment of wholesalers and manufacturers merely in proportion to the swiftness of its growth?”[Francis, 146]

Reaching the banks of the South Saskatchewan, the traveler on the Old Bone Trail turns north, (ie following Avenue H) to arrive at the ferry crossing.  By about 1889 the Qu’Appelle Long Lake and Saskatchewan (QLLS) Bridge was built (where the Senator Sid Buckwold Idylwyld Bridge now stands).  By 1890, the rail station stood where the Midtown Plaza has been erected in contemporary times. Constructed in the image of the old train station.  And in 1907, the Victoria Bridge (Traffic Bridge) opened for traffic.  Using one of these routes the freight of bones would continue onwards to Regina, and thence to Minnesota in the United States.

According to Saskatoon’s Historic Building and Sites, the “railroad lines which dominated the landscape of downtown Saskatoon since 1890 were moved by the Canadian National Railways in 1966 to Chappell Siding west of the city. On a 285-acre site, the CN operates the most modern container, express and passenger services over 40 miles of track.” Clubb. 1973. Note 124

To realize that the Old Bone Trail, at its peak carried 10,000 travelers before the rail arrived is evidence that it was, indeed, quite well used in its day. The Old Bone Trail was instrumental in establishing the “bedroom” communities outside of Saskatoon.

“The trails, like the names, are falling out of use… This network of trails over the valley slopes, is an artifact of a culture that was never quite in residence, never quite got around to naming the winds. I walk the hill paths now and feel the peculiar ache of having lost something I never really had. Though I am related to many of the path-makers, I am not one of them, nor will my children be. I do not know the bends in these paths, nor do I know where the straightest oaks are or where the cranberries grow any more than I know how to set my grandfather’s mink traps or how to run his honey separator….We just got started making the trails of a new culture here, naming the land, and turning space into place, when our civilizing ways moved us to a scale of commerce and trade that could only pull it all apart, undoing what had been built.”[Herriot. 332]

1917 Scarborough Map of Saskatchewan segment showing Rosetown to Saskatoon with Old Bone Trail (Goose Lake Trail ) overlay

“In keeping with this movement to record our history, …through interested citizens…This consciousness of our history – both on a community and on a provincial level- surely justifies the observances …for out of it will grow a perspective about our small inner circles and ever-widening circles of world citizenship” ~Golden Jubilee News If you have further information on the “Old Bone Trail” ~ “The Goose Lake Trail” please e-mail, thank you.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

1924 Rand McNally Pocket Map Tourists and Shippers Guide Railroads, Districts, Cities, Towns Villages, Post Offices, Lakes Rivers, Etc. Date accessed October 17, 2016 Online Historical Map Digitization Project. 2005.

1925 Waghorn’s Guide: Map of Western Canada: Post Offices and RR in Man. Sask. Alta and West Ontario Date accessed October 17, 2016 Date accessed October 17, 2016 Online Historical Map Digitization Project. 2005.

1926 Saskatchewan Highway Map Date accessed October 17, 2016 [showing early highways built on the square] Online Historical Map Digitization Project. 2003.

Archer, John H. Saskatchewan, A History. For the Saskatchewan Archives Board. 1980. Western Producer Prairie Books. ISBN 0-88833-6 bd, 0-88833-2 pa.

Barry, Bill. Geographic Names of Saskatchewan. People Places Publishing Ltd. Regina, Saskatchewan. 2005. ISBN 1-897020-19-2. page 435

Bone Trail Date accessed October 17, 2016 Canada’s Historic Places. Corman Park 344, Saskatoon, SK.

Canadian National Railways Date accessed October 17, 2016 The Canadian Encyclopedia.

Clubb, Sally Potter and William Antony S. Sarjeant. (1973) Saskatoon’s Historic Buildings and Sites. A survey and proposals. Saskatoon, Past, Present and Potential No. 1. Saskatoon Environmental Society.

Delisle, Saskatchewan Date accessed October 17, 2016 Wikipedia.
Delisle, Town of Date accessed October 17, 2016 Winning the Prairie Gamble. Family History Album. Western Development Museum.

Francis, R. Douglas. Images of the West. Changing Perceptions of the Prairies, 1690-1960. Western Producer Prairie Books. Saskatoon, SK. ISBN 0-88833-274-2. 1989.

Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Date accessed October 17, 2016 Wikipedia.

Harris Saskatchewan Date accessed October 17, 2016 Wikipedia.

Herriot, Trevor. River in a Dry Land. A Prairie Passage. ISBN 0-7737-3271-3. 2000. Stoddart Publishing Co. Limited. Toronto. On.
Kerr, D.G. G. Editor. A Historical Atlas of Canada. Thomas Nelson &Sons (Canada) Limited. Toronto, ON. 1960 Library of Congress catalog card number 60-9189.

Laura, Saskatchewan Date accessed October 17, 2016 Wikipedia.

MacLeod, Margaret A. Songs of Old Manitoba. Toronto 1959. 76-77

McLennan, David. Zealandia Date accessed October 17, 2016 Date accessed October 17, 2016 Saskatchewan Encyclopedia. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006.

Russell, R.C. Carlton Trail. The Broad Highway into the Saskatchewan Country from the Red River Settlement. 1840-1880. Prairie Books. The Western Producer. Saskatoon. 1971. Page 1-2

Saskatchewan Golden Jubilee Committee, P.O. Box 1955, Regina. Golden Jubilee
News. Saskatchewan History Vol. Viii, No. 1, Winter 1955. Editor Lewis H Thomas. Saskatchewan Archives Board. University of Saskatchewan. Saskatoon. Saskatchewan. 1955.

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Date accessed October 17, 2016 Wikipedia.

Senator Sid Buckwold Bridge . Wikipedia. Date accessed October 19, 2016.

Tessier, Saskatchewan Date accessed October 17, 2016 Wikipedia.

Traffic Bridge. Wikipedia Date accessed October 19, 2016.

Winkel, James. Old Bone Trail Date accessed October 17, 2016 Saskatchewan Encyclopedia.

2006. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. Date accessed October 17, 2016.

Vanscoy, Saskatchewan Date accessed October 17, 2016 Wikipedia.

Village of Harris Date accessed October 17, 2016

Village of Vanscoy Date accessed October 17, 2016 Date accessed October 17, 2016

Weber, Bob. Saskatchewan History Along the Highway. A traveler’s guide to the fascinating facts, intriguing incidents and lively legends in Saskatchewan’s past. Red Deer College Press. Calgary, AB. ISBN 0-88995-176-4. 1998. Page 131.

2016 Trash Clean Up Statistics

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature.

What did the volunteers of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area actually have to deal with?  Because of data card sheets supplied by the Great Canadian Shoreline Clean Up, there is some idea of the trash clean up at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, as follows:

July 9, 2016 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Clean Up Statistics
8,300 kg was the weight (Metric)
18,300 pounds was the weight (Imperial)
9 tons was the weight (approx tonnage)
350 were the number of recycling bags filled
128 collected and removed cubic yards of trash
Huge Loraas Bins 32 cubic yard roll-off waste bins that were emptied a total of 4 times.
85 collected and recycled tires
19 collected and removed Cigarette Butts
89 collected and removed Food wrappers, candy chips etc.
40 collected and removed Take out containers plastic
24 collected and removed Take out containers foam
66 collected and removed Botle caps plastic
17 collected and removed Bottle caps metal
77 collected and removed Lids Plstic
37 collected and removed Staws, stirrers
17 collected and removed Forks, knives spoons
16 collected and removed Condoms
12 collected and removed Diapers
3 containers collected and removed Syringes / needles
27 collected and removed Femine Hygiene Douche Applicators
10 collected and removed tampons/tampon applicators
20 collected and removed Appliances freezer/refigerators, dishwashers
4 collected and removed batteries
4 collected and removed cigar tips
5 collected and removed cigarette lighters
57 collected and removed clothing, shoies
918 collected and removed construction materials too too many to count
85 collected and removed tires
136 collected and removed toys
23 collected and removed beverage bottles plastic
5 collected and removed beverage bottles glass
34 collected and removed beverage cans
47 collected and removed grocery bages plastic
32 collected and removed other plastic bags
8 collected and removed paper bags
43 collected and removed cups and plates paper
20 collected and removed cups and plates plastic
19 collected and removed cups and plates foam
1 collected and removed 6 pack holders
24 collected and removed other plastic foam packaging
11 collected and removed other plastic bottles
15 collected and removed strapping bands
16 collected and removed tobacco packaging wrap
2 collected and removed ropes
5 collected and removed foam pieces
78 collected and removed glass pieces
81 collected and removed plastic pieces
70 collected and removed scrap metal
30 collected and removed broken glass
6 collected and removed box springs
6 collected and removed mattress
1 collected and removed 200 gallon water tank
2 collected and removed tar can contractor/roofer size
1 collected and removed refrigerator / refrigerator
3 collected and removed metal
1 collected and removed tech
1 collected and removed drain stopper
3 collected and removed eavestrough
12 piles – 12 roofs (minimum) collected and removed shingles
2 found and 1 removed motor
90 litres collected and removed oil
10 collected and removed paint cans
3 collected and removed chesterfields
3 collected and removed pillow
3 collected and removed rebar
20 collected and removed cement foundation chunks
32 collected and removed bricks
1 collected and removed fence
10 collected and removed wood pallets
6 collected and 4 removed Televisions
2 collected and removed sinks
5 collected and removed arborite for counter tops
10 collected and removed doors
7 collected and removed compost bags
1 collected and removed batman toys
5 collected and removed snow shovels
3 collected and removed hats
4 collected and removed windows
1 collected and removed mirror shower door
1 found Engine hood for car
1 collected and removed prescription bottle with pills and label
1 collected and removed Song book
2 collected and removed Books with signatures in them
5 collected and removed hotel grade counter tops
1 collected and removed lawnmower
1 collected and removed arrow

Please remember that there is a $25,000 fine for illegally dumping trash or for  illegally using a motorized vehicle in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  To use a motorized vehicle legally in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area please contact the city for a vehicle permit, they are only $30 each, .and you must state your purpose of needing to use a motorized vehicle in this green space.

“If a man loses one-third of his skin he dies; if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it too dies. If the Earth is a ‘sentient being’, would it not be reasonable to expect that if it loses one-third of its trees and vegetable covering, it will also die?

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature.  Its presence is essential to earth as an organism.  It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

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For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the MVA The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)” .
Twitter: StBarbeBaker