World Biodiversity Day

ON this day, May 22, World Biodiversity Day – The International Day for Biological Diversity, let us celebrate the wonders of biodiversity.

Join us to learn about Land & ecosystem degradation reversal. Protect & rehabilitate watersheds, increase carbon storage & recovery of native biodiversity & crops. Farmer-managed natural regeneration (FMNR) is a low-cost, sustainable land restoration technique used to increase both food and timber production, and resilience to climate extremes. It is a means to protect and restore watersheds, increase carbon storage, and recover native biodiversity resulting in increased crop yields with this low cost method.

On May 25 at 7:00 pm CST, e-meet Tony Rinaudo, the Forest Maker, an agronomist from Australia. Sign up for this virtual session now! Learn more about THE FOREST UNDERGROUND: HOPE FOR A PLANET IN CRISIS

Tony Rinaudo, the Forest maker, received his Bachelor’s Degree, Rural Science University of New England Australia, and agronomy through the University of Armidale as well as attending the Bible College of New Zealand (Diploma in Bible and Missions). Rinaudo is known for putting forward a deforestation management practice known as farmer-managed natural regeneration (FMNR). Following his marriage they ended up for 18 years in Niger, Africa which Rinaudo described as a “moonscape.” Though many tree planting methods were tried the degraded land and the population were facing desert like conditions, famine, disease and drought. Though these degraded conditions exist, without resources for sustaining life FMNR provides sustainable land regeneration to restore Africa’s uplands. Through FMNR, a means of pruning and management, the underground forest of roots catalyzed into trees above ground. Rinaudo worked with local farmers in Niger in the transformation of hectares of dry land. He has worked as the Principal Natural Resources Advisor for World Vision Australia, and is currently the Senior Climate Action Advisor. Rinaudo is recognized for both his environmental and humanitarian approaches for global initiatives.

Rinaudo, the Forest Maker, was the 2018 Laureate of the Right Livelihood Award and bestowed the Member of the Order of Australia. Rinaudo, the “alternative Nobel” winner was portrayed in a documentary “Forest Maker” created by German director and film maker Volker Schlöndorff’ Following the making of the film, a panel session went into the FMNR approach, and the African Forest Landscape Restoration Initiative (AFR100)

Tony Rinaudo, from Australia happened upon one of St. Barbe’s Sahara books which influenced him.  He is now referred to as the “Forest Maker” saving lives, and awarded the Order of Australia and the alternative Nobel Prize in Stockholm for farmer managed natural regeneration. He is an Australian agronomist discovering a way to grow forests without planting trees.

Tony Rinaudo, BSc AM. Agronomist, Senior Climate Advisor World Vision, Forest Maker, Famine Fighter. Rinaudo is an Australian agronomist who has pioneered and championed a simple method to grow trees in dry and degraded lands. He has empowered and inspired a farmer led movement across continents, regreening the lands, improving the livelihoods of millions and helping to combat biodiversity loss and climate change.

We along with Tony Rinaudo are excited to let you know that his new autobiography The Forest Underground: Hope for a Planet in Crisis, will be published on April 30th 2022 by ISCAST–Christians in Science and Technology – see media release, first chapter sample, and product info sheet attached. FMNR video release

A great practice to celebrate the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration.

Celebrate 50 years! Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional park were planted to trees in 1972, 50 years ago. Come out and say Happy Birthday!

UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration #GenerationRestoration hashtag and tag @UNEP and @FAO
UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration #GenerationRestoration hashtag and tag @UNEP and @FAO

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Donations can be made through Paypal, Canada Helps, Contact Donate A Car Canada, SARCAN Drop & Go 106100594 for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

CNCYXE2022 has started!

Well the City Nature Challenge has started! We have had some amazing finds so far. A buteo has been spotted, and a thirteen lined ground squirrel midden, the trembling aspen have their beautiful flowers out. If you stir up the dry leaves on the ground, you might see a bug or two, if you are fast with the iNaturalist camera you might catch a photo or two. Don’t forget to photograph pine cones, seeds, and feathers! It is turning into a beautiful day weather wise also. The City Nature Challenge around the world, had quite a few cities begin before us because of the time zone difference.

Check it out! Saskatoon City Nature Challenge https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/city-nature-challenge-2022-saskatoon-sk

We will do what we can here and have a lot of fun as Saskatchewan and Saskatoon wakes up. Looking and observing nature is a great thing to do for Earth Month!

YouTube Video

Canada City Nature Challenge with all the cities across Canada

World Wide City Nature Challenge with all global cities participating.

😃🍁🍄🥀🌼🌞🌷🌾🎋🌳🌲🐾🐀🐿🐁🐇🐇🕷🐛🦋🐞🐜🐌🐛🕷🦗🐢🐍🦇🐦🦉🦅🦆🐥🐣🐦🦇🐌🦋🦋🦄

Help show the world what Saskatoon’s biodiversity looks like – and sounds like—grab your smartphone, the free @inaturalistorg app, & join this year’s #CityNatureChallenge from April 29–May 2! Great for all ages; find details at FriendsAreas.ca #CNCYXE

Meadowlark

Celebrate 50 years! Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional park were planted to trees in 1972, 50 years ago. Come out and say Happy Birthday!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Donations can be made through Paypal, Canada Helps, Contact Donate A Car Canada, SARCAN Drop & Go 106100594 for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Volunteer Week!

April 24 – 30 is National Volunteer Week. Volunteer for the

City Nature Challenge – City Nature Challenge

City Nature Challenge Saskatoon and Area 2022

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/city-nature-challenge-2022-saskatoon-sk

In love with Saskatoon and Area’s incredible nature? You can help observe on iNat & protect it by joining this year’s #CityNatureChallenge, April 29–May 2! All you need to join is a smartphone and the free @inaturalist app. Learn more at FriendsAreas.ca Explore back yards, the afforestation areas, along the boulevards of our city streets, in the nooks and crannys of fences and trees. Participating is easy: just make observations of wild plants, animals, and fungi, anywhere in the Saskatoon and Area with the free @inaturalist app April 29 – May 2, and they’ll automatically be added to this project.

The CNC was organized by citizen science staff at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (Lila Higgins) and California Academy of Sciences (Alison Young). The City Nature Challenge has become a global effort for people to find and document plants and wildlife in cities across the globe in support of world conservation efforts. It’s a fun citizen science event with a challenge where cities are in a contest against each other to see who can make the most observations of nature, who can find the most species, and who can engage the most people.

Being involved is super easy!

connect with nature- fungi, insects, Plants and Wildlife

From the CNC FAQ page; Take photos, or sound recordings of “any observations of WILD plants, animals, fungi, seaweed, bacteria, lichen, etc. you find in and around your city! Observations of living or dead organisms, or evidence of those organisms, like shells, seeds, tracks, scat, pinecones, feathers, etc., are fine. Remember to make sure you’re taking good photos of the organisms!”

Take a Picture

Take a picture of what you discover in nature. The iNaturalist app records the GPS location of the critter or plant – and you can set it to obscured or leave it as publicly known. (Don’t change location to private or it won’t be part of the City Nature Challenge)

Share!

Upload, share, save your observations through iNaturalist or Ebird or Observation.org

Duties

Why participate in the City Nature Challenge?

There is nature all around us, even in our cities! As the urban footprint and the human monoculture keeps expanding, nature is often overlooked in our cities, which has become a safe haven for many wild animals who no longer have a wild habitat. You cannot protect what you don’t know, and all of us – citizen scientists, scientists, land managers, and the community – come together in Twihamwe “working together as one” to find and document the nature in our area. The Saskatchewan Motto strengthens the volunteer spirit of the City Nature Challenge’ Multis e Gentibus Vires (Latin) (“From Many Peoples Strength!”) By participating in the City Nature Challenge, you can learn more about your local nature, and at the same time you can also make your city a better place – for you and nature!

For the COVID-19 pandemic, some modifications were implemented into the City Nature Challenge 2020 and 2021 to help keep both organizers and participants safe. It is way more important to focus on collaboration rather than competition. And we want to know about and embrace the healing power of nature and encourage the sharing of unique stories, species, habitat ranges found during the CNC. Look inside your own homes, in your own yard, in your local bus stop, along your boulevard or local park. Keep safe, follow all health guidelines for COVID, follow all health guidelines for nature as well! This year’s City Nature Challenge is a hybrid between collaboration and competition.

Create your own iNaturalist account

  • Visit iNaturalist.org
  • Download the app from the AppStore or Google Play
  • Sign In
  • Start sharing your observations
  • Check back later to see the conversation about your observation!

Qualifications

iNaturalist is an free observation platform that uses both computer recognition vision technology alongside crowd sourced corroboration that acts as a place for people to record biodiversity observations, interact with other enthusiasts, and learn about organisms. Observations from iNaturalist also enrich biodiversity science within open science projects such as the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) and the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL). Scientists (and anyone) can freely access and use these data to address their research questions. iNaturalist is as easy to use as 1-2-3!

Find It

Snap It

Share It

This guide, along with YouTube Videos, and planned Virtual events for volunteers who wish to take part will walk you through recommendations for the best ways to use iNaturalist with students in formal or informal settings so they learn from the experience and contribute high-quality observations to the iNaturalist community.

What kinds of observations of nature should I make during the CNC?

Any observations of WILD plants, animals, fungi, seaweed, bacteria, lichen, etc. you find in and around your city! Remember to check under the leaves of your cultivated plants. Observations of living or dead organisms, or evidence of those organisms, like shells, tracks, scat, feathers, etc., are fine. Remember to make sure you’re taking good photos of the organisms!

Celebrate 50 years! Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional park were planted to trees in 1972, 50 years ago. Come out and say Happy Birthday!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Donations can be made through Paypal, Canada Helps, Contact Donate A Car Canada, SARCAN Drop & Go 106100594 for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

iNaturalist Identification For Beginners

iNaturalist Identification For Beginners
Online event
Wednesday, March 23, 2022 at 7:00 PM CST

Learning how to make identifications on iNaturalist. From April 29-May 2 we hope many people around Saskatoon and Area will make observations of nature by downloading the free iNaturalist app to their smart phone. It’s as easy as 1-2-3

From May 3 to May 8 is the identification phase. If you would like some hints and tips to help out, here is an online webinar to make identification easier!

We need your help!

May 9 is when the City Nature Challenge winners from around the World will be announced.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Donations can be made through Paypal, Canada Helps, Contact Donate A Car Canada, SARCAN Drop & Go 106100594 for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Curriculum Resources

 

 

Manual of Instructional Materials for Teachers and Naturalists Teaching About Fungi: Grades K-12

Evergreen

Borrow GPS Units, Borrow SnowShoes have a great classroom adventure for parents and educators

Sask Outdoors resources

Canadian Light Source Lessons and Resources TREE – Trembling Aspen tree rings and Indignous Connections and Lesson Templates

Smokey Bear

The Book of Stuff to Do Outside

Teacher Resources [Brightwater]

  1. Canada’s Forest Heritage
  2. Climate Change
  3. Biodiversity
  4. Forest Sustainability
  5. Species at Risk
  6. Forests and Water
  7. The Boreal Forest
  8. Canada’s Boreal Forest
  9. Canada’s Forests
  10. Teacher’s Guide
  11. Forest Fires Handle with Care

Ready … Set … Wonder? prompts provided by early years educators for engaging with nature

Saskatchewan In Motion outside activities

National Tree Day Educational ToolKit – Tree Canada

Saskatchewan Parks Classroom Resources for  Teachers

Environmental Science 20 resources.

Pine Grosbeak

There are some neat food habits of our winter bird visitor, the Pine Grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator.) This lovely red and slate-colored bird loves our Canadian forests, and frequents the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas because of the evergreens, and the bird feeders of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

The pine grosbeak wanders around five provinces of Canada, and 14 states of the USA. The winter feeding habits are quite distinct from the summer food preferences. They like seeds of conifers, seeds of birch, weeds and grass, all types of berries and buds of ash, maple and conifer trees. In the summer time, the Pine Grosbeak will turn to a greater quantity of wild berries such as those from the dogwood. The remainder of the Pine Grosbeak diet are insects such as grasshoppers, ants, spiders, caterpillars, small flies and beetles.

So it makes sense, this little colorful bird’s genus name Pinicola enucleator pinus (“ pine ”) + colō (“ to inhabit ”.)   So we have as the etymology the specific meaning of  pinicola which means inhabiting (living on) Pinus species, or in the pine trees. And very marvelously the species name of enucleator has an etymology or a meaning of “to remove the kernel from” which is just perfect. This little birds with the specifically adapted beak or a “gros” “beak” meaning large beak especially meant for eating the seeds from the pine cones of the Scots Pine and the Engelmann’s Spruce in the afforestation areas.

Pine Grosbeak

The PINE GROSBEAK Pinicola enucleator at a Length of 9 inches. features some differences between males and females.

Male: Heavy bill, giving it almost the appearance of a Parrot. Above general colour strawberry-red, with some gray fleckings, deepest coloration on head and rump. Wings and tail brown ; some feathers edged with lighter brown and some with white. Below paler red, turning to grayish green on belly. Bill and feet blackish.

Female: Ash-brown, with yellowish bronze wash on rump, head, and breast.

Song .• A subdued, rattling warble broken by whistling notes.

Season: A winter visitor whose appearance is as irregular as the length of its stay.

Breeds : Far north in evergreen woods

Nest: Saddled on a branch or in a crotch. Twigs, roots, and fibre below, with a soft upper section

Pine Grosbeak Pinicola enucleator

This winter visitor is most commonly seen in January out at the afforestation area, so this flock seen in February was a little treat.

Remember to record your sightings on eBird or iNaturalist 😉

Check out the iNaturalist.pdf pamphlet! 

Remember you can download the winter bird checklist brochure here!

The Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. Winter Staycation Brochure 

“The more I work with birds, the more I believe in the undreamt, the things we are not given to know.”  

Julie Zickefoose

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

YouTubePlaylist
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.com
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas
Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“In order to see birds it is necessary to become a part of the silence.”

 Robert Lynd

““Everyone likes birds. What wild creature is more accessible to our eyes and ears, as close to us and everyone in the world, as universal as a bird?”
-– David Attenborough

Who is lackadaisical?

What in the world is Environmental Apathy?

Renée Lertzman asks, “How is it possible to know more about global warming but feel less concern?”

Start on a film-making excursion today.  Because of COVID-19, you are staying home to stop the spread of the coronavirus, order some tree seeds, and begin your journey into vlogging. Pop outside in your back-yard for some soil.  Start by preparing the soil.  Consider how you might do this in a carbon-zero way.  Recycle a plastic container for a plant pot, or use an egg shell.  Plant these seeds.  Nurture your seeds in the sunlight and with just the right amount of water, not too much, not too little.  Think about the wetter, wilder, and warmer aspects of climate change, and how the watering can simulates climate change, and how it is affecting the seedlings in all their various containers.  Take images every day of this little seedling, and create an film or a vlog of the tree’s journey.

“Nature, time and patience are the three great physicians.” Chinese proverb

Richard St. Barbe Baker advocated that everyone become a forest scouts and that they should ” protect the  forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere. “  By taking starting tree seedlings, we are taking action and not settling into environmental apathy.

Today is Thursday,  April 9, and now we are into the second week of Earth Month. This year’s Earth Day 2020 theme is Climate Action.

“If we surrendered to earth’s intelligence we could rise up rooted, like trees.” Rainer Maria Rilke

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Canada Helps

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Trees are classic keystone species

 

“The advantages of treedom are both manifold and manifest.  Big plants can metabolize more effectively because they command so much earth and sky; and they can produce literally tons of seeds, to be scattered far and side….Then again, trees cannot grow where it’s too dry or the soil is too thin, and so they leave scope for many smaller plants that can.  So the world’s grasslands are vast too, like..the prairies of temperate North America. …Trees are classic keystone species: simply by existing and doing their thing, they create niches where other creatures can live.” ~Tudge, Colin. Page xv

“Tender young seedlings are easily consumed by browsing mammals. Hostile fungi are a constant menace, waiting to exploit a wound, or a weakness, and begin devouring a tree’s flesh. Simard’s research indicates that mother trees are a vital defense against many of these threats; when the biggest, oldest trees are cut down in a forest, the survival rate of younger trees is substantially diminished.” Suzanne Simard, a professor of forest ecology, University of British Columbia in Vancouver

 

Bibliography.

Read more Tudge, Colin.  The Tree.  A Natural History of What Trees Are, How They Live, and Why They Matter.  Crown Publishers.  New York.  ISBN 13:978-1-4000-5036-9  ISBN 10:1-4000-5036-7  2006.

 

Read more: Do Trees Talk to Each Other? https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-whispering-trees-180968084/#0tof3RLaXxD0CsYu.99  Richard Grant  Smithsonian Magazine

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Rose Pollination Matching Sheet

Bumblebee on rose
Bumblebee on rose

Rose Pollination

Matching Sheet

Match the definitions of the botanical terms

rose hip A cup-shaped body formed by the conjoined sepals, petals, and stamens.
hypanthium A case divided into lobes called sepals which form a protective case around the rose bud petals.
endosperm Male reproductive organ featuring the collective stamens.
achenes True seeds.
pendulous Female reproductive organ featuring the collective pistils.
calyx The tissue surrounding the embryo of flowering plant seeds.
perfect flower Aggregate fleshy fruiting body containing nutlets.
androecium Hangs down.
gynoecium The united plant part of  stigma, style, and ovary together.
pistil The sepals, petals and stamens at the same level around the lip of the hypanthium with ovary contained below in the cup of the hypanthium.
stamen Having both male and female organs in the same blossom.
perigynous The united plant part of anther sacs containing pollen, and filament together.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Act. Don’t react. See a need, fix it first. Worry about the details later. If you wait until you are asked you have just missed a golden opportunity. They are fleeting and rare.” Philip Wollen founder of Winsome Kindness Trust

“How many lessons of faith and beauty we should lose, if there were no winter in our year!”–Thomas Wentworth Higginson

Answers to Rose Pollination Matching Sheet

Rose Hip
Aggregate fleshy fruiting body containing nutlets.
Hypanthium
A cup-shaped body formed by the conjoined sepals, petals, and stamens.
Endosperm
The tissue surrounding the embryo of flowering plant seeds.
Achenes
True seeds.
Pendulous
Hangs down.
Calyx
A case divided into lobes called sepals which form a protective case around the rose bud petals.
Perfect flower
Having both male and female organs in the same blossom.
Androecium
Male reproductive organ featuring the collective stamens.
Gynoecium
Female reproductive organ featuring the collective pistils.
Pistil
The united plant part of stigma, style, and ovary together.
Stamen
The united plant part of anther sacs containing pollen, and filament together.
Perigynous
The sepals, petals and stamens at the same level around the lip of the hypanthium with ovary contained below in the cup of the hypanthium.

genus Rosa

Common Characteristics of the genus Rosa

How can we determine which of the roses are which in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities?

Part 3

What is taxonomy? Part 1 | Rosids Part 2 | genus Rosa Part 3
| Rose Species Part 4 | Rose reproduction Part 5 | Native Rose Plant Ethnobiology Part 6 | Bibliography   | New Wild Roses of Saskatchewan and How to Tell them Apart

Binomial nomenclature is a two-naming system featuring the first part of the name – the generic name– identifies the genus to which the plant or organism belongs, while the second part – the specific name or specific epithet – identifies the species.

The plants belonging to the genus Rosa can be characteristically described by flowers, leaves, fruit, and thorns.

The flowers of most species of native roses have five petals. Each petal is divided into two distinct lobes and is usually white or pink. Beneath the petals are five sepals. These sepals may be long enough to be visible when viewed from above and appear as green points alternating with the rounded petals. There are multiple superior ovaries that develop into rose hips bearing achenes.  Roses are insect-pollinated in nature.

The leaves are borne alternately on the stem. In most species they are 5 to 15 centimetres (2.0 to 5.9 in) long, pinnate, with (3–) 5–9 (–13) leaflets and basal stipules; the leaflets usually have a serrated margin, and often a few small prickles on the underside of the stem. Most roses are deciduous.

Oddly pinnate leaf - imparipinnate Courtesy Maksim CC x 1.2
Oddly pinnate leaf – imparipinnate Courtesy Maksim CC x 1.2

The leaves of the wild roses of the region are alternate, and oddly pinnated.  Pinnation is the arrangement of the leaflets arise on both sides of a common axis.  This common axis is referred to as a rachis which is the backbone or spine of the leaf.   Each petiole or the stalk attaches the leaf to the stem or peduncle of the plant.  The small leaflets, themselves have little stems called petiolules.  The root pinna is from the Latin meaning “feather”, and these plants can be referred to as “feather-leaved” in everyday or informal usage.  Oddly pinnated leaves are also called imparipinnate, both terms meaning that the leaf bears one lone leaflet at the terminal or top of the leaf, rather than a pair of leaflets.

The aggregate fruit of the rose is a berry-like structure called a rose hip.  The hips of most species are red. Each hip comprises an outer fleshy layer, the hypanthium, which contains 5–160 “seeds” (technically dry single-seeded fruits called achenes) embedded in a matrix of fine, but stiff, hairs. Rose hips of some species are very rich in vitamin C, among the richest sources of any plant. The hips are eaten by fruit-eating birds such as thrushes and waxwings, which then disperse the seeds in their droppings. Some birds, particularly finches, also eat the seeds.

The sharp growths along a rose stem, though commonly called “thorns”, are technically prickles, outgrowths of the epidermis (the outer layer of tissue of the stem), unlike true thorns, which are modified stems. Rose prickles are typically sickle-shaped hooks, which aid the rose in hanging onto other vegetation when growing over it. Some species such as Rosa Acicularlis have densely packed straight prickles, probably an adaptation to reduce browsing by animals. Despite the presence of prickles, roses are frequently browsed by deer.

The amazing thing about the rose bush, is that it will do the best on alluvium soils which are seasonally flooded, which works out well at the afforestation areas located as they are in the West Swale (a low-lying area caused the Pleistocene Yorath Island glacial spillway.)  However, that being said, the roses have a very high drought tolerance.

Mule deer, snoeshow hare, coyotes, squirrels, white-tailed deer and birds such as waxwings, pine grosbeaks, and grouse will nibble on the rose hip fare provided by the rose bush.  Wild rose hips are high in both Vitamin A and Vitamin C.  These animals, and birds will carry the seeds (achenes) away after nibbling on the rose hips, and through the digestive process disperse the seed in new areas.  The achenes do not sprout immediately, in fact, the majority will sprout on the second spring after snow melt.  The seeds require this period of dormancy and require the seasonal changes of warm and cold in order to sprout.  In regards to the health of the animals, the crude protein is higher in the wild rose hip while the leaves remain on the trees.  The rose hips remain on the shrubbery into the winter months, providing a much-needed snack during the cold days of the year for winter foragers when snow covers the ground.  The pollen during the month of June is beneficial for many pollinators.

When trying to distinguish various species of wild roses, bear in mind, that species may hybridize with one another.  The next chapter will delve into the taxonomic classification for species of roses at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities.

Activities and Questions:

  • Take a camera, ruler, pencil, and start a nature journal of your visits to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities where you record observations and measurements about the observable characteristics of native rose plants, insects and animals around these plants. Record their blooming time, and when the petals drop off, and when the leaves turn colour in the autumn.  Are all plants the same? Identify the number of leaflets, and their shape, record the colour of flowers, and the height of the plant.
  • Would a bug find it easy or hard to walk along the top surface of the rose bush leaf?
  • Would an insect find it easy or hard to walk along the underneath surface of the rose bush leaf?
  • Are there any eggs, insect larva, etc under the rose bush leaf?
  • Become a citizen scientist.
  • Stop and smell the roses!  How do your ears, eyes, nose, mouth and skin relate to native rose plants for all the senses – hearing, sight, smell, taste, and touch?  Do other animals need their senses to interact with native rose plants?
  • Compare native rose plants with other forbes, and flora in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities.  Which plants bloom at the same time?
  • Do you think pollinator insects, dogs, birds, and deers appreciate the smell of the native rose plants?
  • How do you think rose bush plants get the rose seeds out of the rose hip so the seeds may germinate in the ground?
  • What kind of safety procedures would you need to use when observing a native rose plant?  What do animals do when presented with the sticky substance on rose leaves, or with the thorns and bristles on the rose stem?
  • Compare the flowers, leaves, and seeds between the native rose plants, and other plants in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities.
  • What kind of seasonal changes may occur for a native rose plant?
  • Why do native roses lose their leaves for the winter months?
  • Why would animals  choose to eat rose hips in the winter?  Do native rose plants support the health or harm the growth of deers, rabbits, and squirrels?  Do animals help the plants?  What happens when the animals disperse the seeds after digesting the rose hips which contain the rose seeds?  Create a food web of animals and native rose plant interactions.  What would happen if the native rose plant became extinct?
  • How have humans affected the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities?  Analyze an issue or case study where humans have greatly affected these environments, including a cost‐benefit analysis and ethical implicaᅾons
  • Are the native rose plants afforested in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities, or do they grow naturally there?
  • Create a map which will guide others to the location of a native rose plant.
  • Create a set of directions from a specified location to arrive at the location of a native rose plant which you have found.
  • Why are there no native rose plants in the middle of a trembling aspen grove?
  • How can a native rose plant reproduce, if the animals eat the rose hips which contain the rose seeds?
  • Observe the native rose plants, and write a poem or story, paint a picture or sketch a drawing of them.
  • Analyze any of the native rose plants, and see what happens if there is a lot of rain, or if there is an extended dry spell.
  • How do the native rose plants defend themselves, if there is a large population of wildlife eating their rose hips and flowers?

Bibliography

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

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