Please be careful out there!

 

The number of vehicles on Valley Road and Township Road 362A (Cedar Villa Road) has increased exponentially, with the opening of the Civic Operations Centre, the trails at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area, and the traffic to the South West Off Leash Recreation Area. There is Chappell Marsh Conservation Area, and right across the road is the  forest at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  It is wise to slow down; if a deer jumps out from between the trees of the forest to the farmers field, to the conservation area, it is best to take precautions, and be safe. The number of deers killed on Valley Road and on Township Road 362A (Cedar Villa Road) is taking its toll on the animal population over the last few months, and can be disastrous for drivers.

Please be careful out there!

“The human cost of vehicle collisions with wildlife is substantial. On average 387 people are injured and 4 killed in animal related collisions on Saskatchewan roads…The peak times for collisions are dawn and dusk. Yellow wildlife warning signs indicate areas of high risk. No matter the season or time of day, it’s important to watch for signs of wildlife and reduce your speed accordingly. Slowing down reduces the distance required to stop and decreases the force of impact in the event of a collision. ”

“Reduce Speed
Speed is one of the most common factors in vehicle collisions.

Speed:Reduces the drivers ability to steer away from objects in the roadway

Speed: Extends the distance required to stop
Speed: Increases the force of impact, in the event of a collision
With good road conditions, drivers tend to increase their speed. Some studies suggest that wildlife vehicle collisions occur more than expected on clear nights, on dry road conditions and on long straight stretches. Drivers may tend to be more cautious on curves or in poor weather“ Wildlife Collision Prevention Program.

“It happens so quickly. It’s just like somebody cutting you off or something like that,” Jordan Goodlad told CBC News in describing his encounter with a deer on the road… “You almost don’t realize it ’til it’s done.” CBC News

If we are willing to be still and open enough to listen, wilderness itself will teach us. Steven Harper

“If you’ve driven on North American roads, you’ve seen roadkill – animals that have been killed by passing traffic. At some time, you may have run over a small animal on the road. You may even have had the harrowing experience of striking a large animal. “ Canada Safety Council
“Roads attract wildlife because they provide a travel corridor, easy access to vegetation and in the winter, a source of salt. ..[Fish and Wildlife] Officers advise drivers to reduce their speed at night and around water or on tree-lined roads. Scan the road and ditches for animals and use high beams when possible; deer eyes glow when struck by light. “ Tim Evans.
The fall/winter season is a busy time of year for wildlife. While we always recommend keeping an eye out, your chances of colliding with a wild animal increase from October to January. (In the spring, wildlife collisions also increase between May and June.)
Think it can’t happen to you? Check out the statistics:
Every 38 minutes in Canada, there’s 1 collision between a motor vehicle and a wild animal.
89% of collisions with wildlife happen on two-lane roads just outside cities and towns.
86% of wildlife collisions happen in on warm weather days.” SGI Canada 2017

“While a vehicular collision with a deer can be very costly and sometimes cause personal injury, a collision with a moose can have very dire consequences” says Darrell Crabbe. “That’s why we engage in this annual campaign. It is our hope that the message will save lives, both human and wildlife.” Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation

With huge and enormous thanks to Minqing Deng, P.Eng. City of Saskatoon Transportation Engineer who has gone out of her way to save the wildlife in Saskatoon, preserve the environment, and save humans from tragic collisions!  Please be careful out there!  Save a deer, and protect yourself.

Grandfather,
Look at our brokenness.
We know that in all creation
Only the human family has strayed from the Sacred Way.
We know that we are the ones who are divided.
And we are the ones who must come back together,
To walk in the Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
O Sacred One,
Teach us love, compassion and honor
That we may heal the earth
And heal each other. Ojibway Prayer

Bibliography:
Caution: Animals Crossing Traffic Safety Canada Safety CouncilCollisions involving deer, semi carring hazardous materials shut down highway south of Saskatoon. CBC News October 27 2018
Oh, deer: What to do if there’s an animal on the road Tim Evans. Oct 24 2017
Stay safe during wildlife collision season SGI Canada. Nove 27 2017
Collisions with wildlife up in Saskatchewan 980 CJME
Spike in Vehicle – Wildlife collisions causes concern Chelsea Walters. Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation.
Wildlife Collision Prevention Program
When Do Collisions with Wildlife Occur? Reducing the Risk
Wildlife Collisions SGI
Wildlife collisions rising:SGI CBC News
Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions in Canada: A Review of the Literature and a Compendium of Existing Data Sources Traffic Injury Research Foundation.

I always thought of deer as solitary animals that weren’t very interesting. But my goodness, that was very wrong. The big eye-opener for me was that they’re social. They have family groups. Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

 

 

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Saskatoon’s Green Belt

World Cities Day
31 October 2018

“The more successfully a city mingles everyday diversity of uses and users in its everyday streets, the more successfully, casually (and economically) its people thereby enliven and support well-located parks that can thus give back grace and delight to their neighborhoods instead of vacuity. ” ~Jane Jacobs American-Canadian journalist on Urban Planning

1960. A green belt for the city starts with Bert Wellman, Saskatoon Planning Department, who walked around Saskatoon’s perimeter choosing high spots of land for scenic beauty. Together with City Planner Bill Graham they worked on parkways and planted trees for the 1960 Circle Drive Parkway at these sites. Alfred Henry Browne “Man of the Trees” city Parks Superintendent – “The Man Who Made Saskatoon Beautiful” had a vision for Saskatoon – planting over 30,000 trees in the city. Wyndham Winkler Ashley local horticulturist and founder of the parks board advocated trees, and dispersed tree seedlings. They all envisioned a green city.
“The Richard St. Barb Baker Afforestation Area was established in 1960 to create a green belt around the city. Trees, which act as habitat for local wildlife, were planted in rows to generate a man-made forest.”(World Web.com) From Jeffery O’Brien at the City Archives, it has been determined that in 1960, the city purchased the land, parts of Sections 22 and 23 Township 36, Range 6 West of the third meridian, south of the CN Chappell yards.

1972. Planting in reserved lands purchased in 1960 for a tree belt begins in 1972. “A tree belt as a windbreak and to create a sense of enclosure is suggested along the edges of development for all areas which will not expand in the near future. Such a belt can already be considered along the northern boundary of Westview Heights. In conclusion it can be stated that a seemingly overwhelming demand lies ahead, however, through careful timing, programming and design there should be few difficulties. It should be remembered that the city forefathers reserved beautiful parks along the river, others have developed in Kiwanis Park, the University Grounds and numerous treed and landscaped streets. They did so under adverse conditions with a population of 20,000. They gave the city a reputation as the “City Beautiful” and today’s residents should be willing to uphold their tradition.” (Wellman. 1963. P 18)_At this time City Council passes an order in council that the afforestation is protected in perpetuity.

1976 On June 7, the Planning and Development Committee prepare the South Saskatchewan River Corridor Study: Towards a River Edge Authority. From this an autonomous agency arises upon which Saskatoon and Corman Park agree to implement the report.

1978 Moriyama’s Meewasin Valley Project 100-Year Conceptual Master Plan is submitted by Raymond Moriyama Architects and Planners. Moriyama’s report includes the river valley of the South Saskatchewan River and also rural lands adjacent to the natural drainage systems feeding into the South Saskatchewan River. The “West Swale” as described by Golder Associates is a low lying wetlands area which has its confluence at the South Saskatchewan River. The West Swale – its wetlands and surrounding environment does have a congruency with the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The core concept of Moriyama’s plan was that this is indeed a unique land with a unique people, the objective is balance. As the current plans for the South West Sector are to develop the area as a Business Park and not as residential, it is even more imperative to address conservation practices and sustainable open space and parks preservation for future generations. Additionally a sound business park development needs to take into account the fundamental values of the Meewasin Valley Authority
1/ Nature conservancy.
2/ The improvement of water quality and a reduction of pollution
3/ The need for increased education and research opportunities
4/ An enhancement between rural and urban inter-relationships and users.
5/ An improvement of recreational opportunities
6/ The moving forward on cultural aspects in the area.
“Meewasin Valley Authority The Meewasin Valley Authority (Meewasin) was formed in 1979 to act as an agent of the City, the University, and the Province of Saskatchewan to ensure a healthy and vibrant river valley, with a balance between human use and conservation. The Meewasin Valley Authority Act (MVA Act) establishes the mandate of Meewasin, its powers, and its jurisdiction, and the Conservation Zone. Meewasin‘s mandate can be summarized into three mandate areas: conservation, development, and education. It is around this time residents of the RM of Corman Park petitioned to protect agricultural lands from the MVA conservation area, leaving a portion of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area [RSBBAA] and all lands within the afforestation area formerly known as George Genereux park without management from the MVA

By 1979, the afforestation is named in the honour of Dr. Richard St. Barbe Baker, L.L.D., O.B.E. – founder of the international group “Men of the Trees”

2013 South West Off Leash Dog Park becomes a small fenced off area within the afforestation area. During this year, Golder Associates conducted their natural screening of the southwest sector which included the “Wooded area” namely Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Maps show that the Blairmore sector afforestation areas are congruent with the wetlands area named the “West Swale”

2014. “Advantages  of Incorporating Natural Wetlands as Features in Urban Planning Wetlands in landscape settings, whether urban or rural, provide open space, wildlife, aesthetic, recreation,  ambient temperature, and educational benefits to local and regional residents in addition the direct stormwater  flood management and water quality  improvements….natural wetlands provide valuable ecological benefits such as groundwater recharge and improved water quality, storage and cycling of nutrients and sediments, carbon sequestration, and enhanced wildlife habitat and biodiversity. [1]”

2016 The Afforestation Area is one of the nature viewing sites in the updated version of the Saskatoon Nature Society’s latest book, Nature and Viewing Sites in and Around Saskatoon.

“While you are looking, you might as well also listen, linger and think about what you see.” Jane Jacobs American-Canadian journalist on Urban Planning

 

“The important thing to remember is that even if you seem like the only one in all of North American who uses more native [native plants] than aliens, wildlife will be better off for your efforts. The effects will be cumulative, and probably synergistic, as more and more people join you. And don’t forget that plants are long-lived. The [native tree] you plant tomorrow could easily live 300 years, servicing innumerable insects, birds, squirrels, mice, raccoons, and deer every year of its life. Yes, you can make a difference on a small plot of land. You can even make a difference if you own no land. If you live in an apartment, you may be able to influence the landscaping habits of your landlord, or the company you work for, or the township supervisors who control your city parks, or your sibling who does own property. If we humans are capable of turning hundreds of millions of acres of rainforest into depleted grasslands, and extirpating millions of buffalo from the plains, and billions of passenger pigeons from the skies and cod from the North Atlantic, we are also capable of returning natives to our gardens.” ~ Douglas Tallamy

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1.  Wetland Design Guidelines For the City of Saskatoon CH2MHILL March 2014

2. Wellman, Hilbert E. and Henry F. Frolich. (1963) Community Planning Scheme 1963. Henry F. Frolich, Assistant City Planner, and Hilbert E. Wellman, City Planning and Building Director. Page 18.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

Build a Prairie?

How can you “Build a Prairie?

Would you like the opportunity to play this game along with learning about plants and animals that compose the prairie ecosystem with the Field Guide to the Prairie?

How about taking a QuickTime VR movie to test drive your newly acquired skills, before you wander out on the prairie searching for plants and animals?

Or perhaps you are interested to know what exactly is a Master Naturalist?

Please check out the offerings by the Native Plant Society of Saskatchewan

“Anticipate Success. Let us heal the naked scars in the earth and restore her green mantle. Let us set our Earth family in order.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s Creation, this beautiful Earth. The ancients believe that the Earth was a sentient being and felt the behavior of mankind upon it. As we have no proof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible perople to accept this point of view and behave accordingly.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Relief from Pain

Oct 16 World Food Day

“Some may have to suffer mental or physical pain before they are able to accept the teaching they are in most need of.  I have noticed that this applies to vegetarianism.  When people have made themselves very sick living on unnatural foods and maybe have spent fortunes on specialists and submitted themselves to serious surgical operations and in the end have given up and told there is no hope of recover, then and only then, as a last resort, you will find people experimenting with the vegetarian way of life.”~My Health – My Wealth Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

“It seems difficult for people to accept the fact that it is quite unnecessary to kill for food. Yet beef and mutton have been so long regarded as providing the perfect protein on the grounds that it is claimed that they contain all the amino acids that the body requires for health.  But surely one of the values of any food lies in its power to neutralize the acid waste left in the system by other foods. Meat is not only acid-forming, but it is deficient in calcium, iron, sodium and Vitamins C and D.  The small quantities of Vitamins A and D found it it are usually destroyed by cooking.  “~My Health – My Wealth Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Shepherdia argentea, commonly called silver buffaloberry bull berry, or thorny buffaloberry. CC-BY-SA-3.0 credit Julia Adamson
Shepherdia argentea, commonly called silver buffaloberry bull berry, or thorny buffaloberry. CC-BY-SA-3.0 credit Julia Adamson

Persons on strictly vegetarian diets have been remarkable for longevity.  “~My Health – My Wealth Richard St. Barbe Baker.

June_7795

“We cannot remove tree cover without running the risk of losing the blessing of the water cycle. We cannot denude the earth’s surface without creating the desiccation of sand the dust dunes. We cannot permit animals to devour whatever little is left of green growth. Excessive grazing of cattle, sheep and goats is as damaging to the land as a wholesale felling of trees…” from Desert Challenge Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Caragana Flower Blooom FRichard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Saskatoon, SK CA
Caragana Flower Bloom (edible) Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Saskatoon, SK CA

“They’re teaching about The Pyramid of Life in the schools today. There is the ground producing all the soil bacteria, which is in the top few inches. That grows the grass, and a a lamb comes along and eats ten pounds of grass, and that makes one lamb, and then a tiger comes along and eats ten pounds of lamb, and that makes one pound of tiger. We have too many tigers. The Pyramid of Life is upset, and one of the things we must do is to turn from an animal economy to a silvan economy. We’ve got to have tree crops, instead of wasting all this land for raising beef and bringing money to the beef barons, who are proud to call themselves beef barons. It takes eighteen times more land to feed people on beef than it does on nuts and fruit. Eighteen times more land. When half the human family today are dying from starvation. I don’t feel justified in making these demands on the earth. I, myself have been a lifelong vegetarian. ” Richard St. Barbe Baker. State of the Forests. Probe Post Canada’s Environmental Magazine, October 1982. Richard Beharriell interview with Richard St. Barbe Baker in 1980.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and …today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth. Richard St. Barbe Baker
Richard St. Barbe Baker

Joy and Inspiration

UNESCO World Teachers’ Day

5 October 2018

“Education is improving the lives of others and for leaving your community
and world better than you found it.”  Marian Wright Edelman

Given a teacher with a love of out-of-door life, with observant eyes and ears, and the spirit that sympathizes with children’s curiosity and stimulates inquiry, Nature Study will be a joy and an inspiration to pupils.

 

“Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.”  William Wordsworth

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

Nature is man’s teacher.
She unfolds her treasure to his search,
unseals his eye, illumes his mind,
and purifies his heart;
an influence breathes from all the sights and sounds
of her existence.  Alfred Billings Street

 

A natural balance

October 4 is World Animal Day

“We believe in the development of a fuller understanding of the true relationship between all forms of life, in an endeavour to achieve a natural balance between minerals, animals and mankind” Segment from the New Earth Charter, Men of the Trees

“Earth is richer for Richard St. Barbe Baker. He knew from his youth that the Earth was a sentient living being and that we humans are an integral part of nature. He is truly a steward of the planet, accepting the task that God gave Adam of tending the creatures He had made. His passion for trees has led him to give his dynamic energy to awakening mankind to the folly of exploiting the tree cover of the earth for gain, without replacing the loss. St. Barbe Baker has probably done more than any man alive to awaken a love of trees.”~Sir George Trevelyan, Bt. M.A.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and …today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth. Richard St. Barbe Baker
Richard St. Barbe Baker

Pyramid of Life

World Animal Day October 4

“The world’s problem, is not a population explosion, but an animal explosion. We’ve got to decide whether we are going to feed animals or humans. To feed animals is a roundabout way of getting food. It takes 18 times more land to feed people on beef than on vegetables, nuts fruits and grains.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

World Animal Day is an international day of action for animal rights and welfare celebrated annually on October 4, the feast day of Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals.*

“They’re teaching about The Pyramid of Life in the schools today. There is the ground producing all the soil bacteria, which is in the top few inches. That grows the grass, and a lamb comes along and eats ten pounds of grass, and that makes one lamb, and then a tiger comes along and eats ten pounds of lamb, and that makes one pound of tiger. We have too many tigers. The Pyramid of Life is upset, and one of the things we must do is to turn from an animal economy to a silvan economy. We’ve got to have tree crops, instead of wasting all this land for raising beef and bringing money to the beef barons, who are proud to call themselves beef barons. It takes eighteen times more land to feed people on beef than it does on nuts and fruit. Eighteen times more land. When half the human family today are dying from starvation. I don’t feel justified in making these demands on the earth. I, myself have been a lifelong vegetarian. ” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker. State of the Forests. Probe Post Canada’s Environmental Magazine, October 1982. Richard Beharriell interview with Richard St. Barbe Baker in 1980.

The mission of World Animal Day, according to the official World Animal Day website is “To raise the status of animals in order to improve welfare standards around the globe. Building the celebration of World Animal Day unites the animal welfare movement, mobilising it into a global force to make the world a better place for all animals. It’s celebrated in different ways in every country, irrespective of nationality, religion, faith or political ideology. Through increased awareness and education we can create a world where animals are always recognised as sentient beings and full regard is always paid to their welfare.”*

“I am convinced that the vegan way of life is the only sane way of life, and realising that the basic cause of tension is growing populations and diminishing food sources, for the past ten years I have devoted much of my time to studying the question of food production and the problems of large scale land reclamation by tree planting”. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BE KIND TO ANIMALS DON’T EAT THEM – Join the Vegetarians

“We cannot permit animals to devour whatever little is left of green growth. Excessive grazing of cattle, sheep and goats is as damaging to the land as a wholesale felling of trees…”Richard St. Barbe Baker

Animal Defence League of Canada

WARNING: Animal flesh can be dangerous to your health – Join the Vegetarians

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

“I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy form my having lived in it. “Richard St. Barbe Baker.