Canada-wide CLS environmental education program explores historical time lines

Find out about electron beam energy, environmental education, and how to take a trip back into time.

Eventbrite registration Sun, September 19, 2021 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM CST online webinar registration Canadian CLS environmental education program explores historical time lines

Introduction to TREE where students from Grade 6 to 12 can meet with Dr Colin Laroque in the Mistik Askiwin Dendrochronology Lab (MAD Lab) to work with the Canadian Light Source (CLS) Synchrotron. What does the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron have to do with Trembling Aspens, and Climate Change? Tree ring patterns reveal lifestyles, climate history, and so much more! What kind of learning can be experienced peeking into the heart of trees? Trans-Canadian Research and Environmental Education (TREE) project: a Canadian educational research program.

Eventbrite Registration Sun, September 19, 2021 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM CST online webinar registration Canadian CLS environmental education program explores historical time lines

Dendrochronology, TREE Cross Canada education program
Dendrochronology, TREE Cross Canada education program

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1979 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

National Forest Week The last full week of September. Maple Leaf Day the Wednesday of that week.
National Forest Week The last full week of September. Maple Leaf Day the Wednesday of that week.

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

Sat. Sept 18 7:00 Ryan Brook Saskatoon’s Wildlife—the real night life in Saskatoon! Saskatoon’s trail cams reveal who’s who. 

Sept 19 2:00 Nature Snapshot in Time

Sun Sep. 19 2:00 Forestry Farm Walking Tour

Canada-wide CLS environmental education program explores historical time lines Sun. Sep 19 7:00

Mon Sept 20 2:00 Flag raising Ceremony at City Hall – National Forest Week

Mon Sept 20 7:00 The Urban Forest and Climate Change

During National Forest Week enjoy the self-guided SOS Tree Tour of unique trees in our fair city!

Tues Sept 21 7:00  Dr. Colin Laroque Shelterbelts SB- Decision Support System and Agroforestry

Wed. Sept 22 Maple Leaf Day 7:00 National Healing Forests Truth and Reconciliation

Thurs Sept 23 7:00 Urban forests and greenspaces enhance Saskatoon’s quality of life.

Fri Sept Sep 24 at 7:00 pm When and Where did you see What?!?

Sat Sept 25 7:00 PaRx in Saskatchewan, PaRx, Canada’s First National Prescription Program has officially arrived in Saskatchewan!

Sunday Sunday Sep 26 at 2:00 Forest connections and guided walk

Sunday Sep 26, 2021 at 7:00 pm Our Forests.  Are They Alive?

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Where’s Waldo Nature Connect

“Where’s Waldo” Nature Connect at the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas

What do Sherlock Holmes, Nature, “Where’s Waldo”, conservation and Word Search puzzles have in common? Have fun detecting, and finding nature out of doors in the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas. We need your skills! The more eyes that come out the merrier, and the more variety in species can be found! Young, old and anywhere between, groups and individuals, it all makes a difference to compiling a baseline data inventory at the Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and at George Genereux Park in the City of Saskatoon!

There has not been an ecological assessment conducted at the afforestation areas yet. So many people think that there are only afforested tree species [exotic], and brome grass and nothing else, yet how does that explain a baker’s dozen species at risk? How does that explain the moist mixed grassland prairie species in the trembling aspen bluffs which have remained since before 1972, they are over 50 years old? How many people can actually see the laboratory in ecological succession happening in the afforestation areas? What about the wetlands? How come the forest is raising the water-table for the wetlands, and it has not dried up yet? This was a feature which Richard St. Barbe Baker advocated for a lot. What is it that trees do? Their roots go down, down, down, and bring water up to the leave, where there is transpiration, and there are micro-climates of rain for the trees and forests. Can you imagine if there were more and more trees and forests? Then there would not be micro-climates, there would be larger scale nature based solutions to climate change.

Two sundays in a row two different species at risk have been identified. Their lives depend on you to help document the biodiversity in the afforestation areas! So what will happen next Sunday?

Come out on your own or venture out at a group meet up time as follows:

Aug 8 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Aug 15 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
Aug 22 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1038557,-106.7890613 West Side
Aug 29 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Sep 5 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS
GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
Sep 12 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1038557,-106.7890613 West Side
Sep 19 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Sep 26 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
At the meetups, we can help you get familiar with the iNaturalist app.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Compost DED Education

The City of Saskatoon is acting on the instances of Dutch Elm Disease found in the city! An informational pamphlet about Dutch Elm Disease DED will be given to those who arrive at the compost depot with elm over the summer 2021 months! The pamphlet will illustrate the dangers to the city urban forest if elm is disposed of incorrectly, and why the guidelines are in place to prevent a pandemic from sweeping through the elms in the city. Where we, as humans, can wear facemasks as protection for the COVID-19 pandemic, the Elm trees are not quite so lucky. The Elm trees rely on humans!

The Elm bark beetle passes through the winter inside the Elm as larva and as an adult. There is no way to protect the Elms against the fungus, though birds and other insects may destroy Elm bark beetles at their various life cycles from egg to larva to beetle. Very low winter temperatures kill many Elm bark beetles. The galleries holding the beetle eggs may be so small with the diseased wood (the food of the larva) that not all eggs may develop into full grown beetles. The best way to control the spread of DED is to remove all trees or parts of trees which may become homes to the Elm Bark Beetle, its eggs and larva. Dutch elm disease (DED) is caused by Ophiostoma ulmi – a member of the sac fungi (Ascomycota) – affecting elm trees, and is spread by elm bark beetles.

The Saskatoon StarPhoenix reported City finds more than 13 tonnes of improperly stored elm wood…Since it confirmed a case of Dutch elm disease in mid-September, the city issued 71 infraction notices, 46 of which contained elm firewood. In light of the Dutch Elm Disease found in the City of Saskatoon and the follow up by the City of Saskatoon staff to discover if any Elm firewood had been stored within city limits, the city is taking action at the drop off compost depots. All persons using the drop off compost depots to recycle their leaf cuttings, pruned branches and logs will still be directed that Elm must be disposed of at the city landfill. Additionally the informational pamphlet will help the Elm that is to be discarded, actually and really is thrown into the city landfill.

A note! Please pay attention to your community association neighbourhood newsletters. They announce when the community association will have a Loraas bin in your neighbourhood in the spring and/or the fall season.

“From April 1 to August 31 every year, it is illegal to prune elm trees in Saskatchewan.” The City of Saskatoon post information each year about when to prune Elm Trees (when the Elm Beetle is the least active). To identify if an Elm may be disease and infected with the fungus, please consult City of Saskatoon Tree Diseases and Pests.

As a citizen scientist there are steps you can take!

  • Do not store Elm firewood, or any Elm cuttings at all
  • Only prune Elm trees between August 31 to March 31
  • Help to identify infected trees The Government of Saskatchewan says that “DED testing is done free of charge for Saskatchewan residents”
  • Learn more about Dutch Elm Disease as it is a fungus which affects the trees. The fungus is carried from Elm tree to Elm tree by three species of Elm Bark Beetles. The fungus is carried from place to place by people transporting cut Elm or storing cut Elm.
  • Share the facebook STOP elm disease in the afforestation areas fund raiser!

Help support this fundraiser to STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic from entering the afforestation areas!

Always dispose of any elm wood at the City Landfill

The fundraiser will go towards vehicle mitigation barriers and park identification signage to STOP illegal motorized trespass and illegal dumping!

Please SHARE this fundraiser, taking care of trees is vitally important in this era of climate change! Protect our elms! LOOK at the George Genereux Clean UP Results!!! Please share the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. [a non profit charity] fundraiser. You can get a charitable receipt By donating to the STOP Dutch Elm Disease fundraiser, you may receive as much as 53% of the amount you donated back at tax-time.

Dutch Elm Disease can be fatal to the elm trees in the afforestation areas. SOS Trees Coalition also deals with Dutch Elm Disease, as they started out under the name of SOS Elms Coalition.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

iNaturalist

Besides our September clean up at George Genereux Urban Regional Park we would like to encourage as many folks as possible to participate in bio-blitzes and invite them to come out to either afforestation area – Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional park – and record plants and animals via their smart phone on the iNaturalist app.

These community volunteer bio-blitz actions will coordinate well with the ecological assessment and master plan being proposed for the area. The City of Saskatoon and the Meewasin Valley Authority will develop a management plan taking into consideration the base line inventory and ecological assessment in preparation for a variety of opportunities such as perhaps a permaculture three sisters vegetable garden to prepare the site for a native food forest or a pollinator ribbon of native flowers below the transmission lines.

There are several youth and environmental groups waiting to come on board for projects such as these, but first we need to encourage volunteers to help out on iNaturalist. Identification will be easier if folks can come out in the month of August before leaves fall from the trees, and before butterflies go into chrysalis and moths into cocoons.

In the aftermath of COVID, perhaps community gardens, and food forests may be of paramount importance for our community health and well being. Folks can contact us to arrange a date to come out friendsafforestation@gmail.com, and we can help them get used to how to use the iNaturalist app, either in person, or via a zoom meeting virtually. It is a great COVID activity for folks outside as it takes place in a large outdoor space where there is plenty of room for social distancing.  This is also a great home schooling science activity!

So, now that Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has been cleaned up [2006], it is amazing what plants and animals are being found via iNaturalist, and it is still to be discovered what is out at George Genereux Urban Regional Park.

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Eco-Quest :

Baker Area Eco-Quest

George Genereux Urban Regional Park Eco-Quest:

Genereux Park Eco-Quest

Check out the iNaturalist.pdf pamphlet!

Remember you can download the winter bird checklist brochure here!

The Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. Winter Staycation Brochure 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.  at friendsafforestation@gmail.com  We are conducting a virtual bottle drive if you phone or contact us, we will make safe arrangements for pick up and provide you with a charitable receipt.   Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain. ” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 “We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“All processes in the ecosystem are disturbed by human activities in the valley.  Nevertheless, there is surprising diversity and abundance of lifeforms.  In its conservation role, the MVA should ensure that human enjoyment of this natural resource does not significantly deter from the health of the resource.” (Fitzgibbon, 1982)

Citizen Science & CBC radio One

May 19 2019 at 7:45 am The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park were on  CBC Radio One SASKATCHEWAN WEEKEND for the morning show with Shauna Powers on the Sunday May 19 2019 7:45 am show. If you did not catch the show live, please tune in here. The Wild About Saskatoon Nature City Festival kicks off this week May 21-26, 2019 with a theme

I Spy With My Wild Eye…

.

 

 

 

The Festival keynote evening is at the Broadway Theatre at 7 p.m. on Wednesday evening, May 22, featuring Dr. Maureen Murray, a rising star in the field of urban ecology and an expert on urban coyotes.  She is joined on stage by a circle of voices from Saskatoon, offering a variety of inspiring ways to build a nature-friendly city.

Current global response insufficient;
‘Transformative changes’ needed to restore and protect nature;
Opposition from vested interests can be overcome for public good
Most comprehensive assessment of its kind;
1,000,000 species threatened with extinction. UN Report

At both the wild walks, we will learn about “Citizen Science” to make a connection with the natural world in place based learning.

“The Wild Walk” is on Tuesday May 21 6:30 – 8:00 pm out at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  Join us in the South West Off Leash Recreation Area, and we will walk west out of the off leash dog park, and proceed to the wetlands, making observations as to the flora and fauna along the way.  Learn about Richard St. Barbe Baker along the way, who was the first honourary member of the World Wildlife Fund.

Try “The Wild Spring Walk” on Thursday May 23 6:30 – 8:00 pm by venturing out to the George Genereux Urban Regional Park.  We will start west of the CNR overpass which crosses SK Hwy 7, and walk south and west through the woodlands searching out spring wildlife and emergent plants.

Ten Principles of Citizen Science

  1. Citizen science projects actively involve citizens in scientific endeavour that generates new knowledge or understanding. Citizens may act as contributors, collaborators, or as project leader and have a meaningful role in the project.
  2. Citizen science projects have a genuine science outcome. For example, answering a research question or informing conservation action, management decisions or environmental policy.
  3. Both the professional scientists and the citizen scientists benefit from taking part. Benefits may include the publication of research outputs, learning opportunities, personal enjoyment, social benefits, satisfaction through contributing to scientific evidence e.g. to address local, national and international issues, and through that, the potential to influence policy.
  4. Citizen scientists may, if they wish, participate in multiple stages of the scientific process. This may include developing the research question, designing the method, gathering and analysing data, and communicating the results.
  5. Citizen scientists receive feedback from the project. For example, how their data are being used and what the research, policy or societal outcomes are.
  6. Citizen science is considered a research approach like any other, with limitations and biases that should be considered and controlled for. However unlike traditional research approaches, citizen science provides opportunity for greater public engagement and democratisation of science.
  7. Citizen science project data and meta-data are made publicly available and where possible, results are published in an open access format. Data sharing may occur during or after the project, unless there are security or privacy concerns that prevent this.
  8. Citizen scientists are acknowledged in project results and publications.
  9. Citizen science programmes are evaluated for their scientific output, data quality, participant experience and wider societal or policy impact.
  10. The leaders of citizen science projects take into consideration legal and ethical issues surrounding copyright, intellectual property, data sharing agreements, confidentiality, attribution, and the environmental impact of any activities.Source

“The diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems, as well as many fundamental contributions we derive from nature, are declining fast, although we still have the means to ensure a sustainable future for people and the planet.” said Professor Sandra Díaz

Come out for a Nature City Festival walk, engage in Citizen Science, learnt about WildObs Observer, Sci.Spy, Project Noah, iNaturalist, LeafSnap, and many other ways, you can contribute to Citizen Science.  There are many research projects are engaging millions of individuals young and old in the collection of scientific data. Citizen Science as a valuable tool for conservation in urban eeosystems.   “Public participation in scientific research,” participatory monitoring, and participatory action research often see advancements in scientific research, as well as an increase in the public’s understanding of science. “Citizen science can push conservation biology in residential ecosystems from being a “science of discovery” to a “science of engagement.”source

Aichi Biodiversity Targets

 

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