Professor Laurence Roche

“Never before in the history of man has forestry, both in the developed and developing worlds, attracted so much public attention. Environmental degradation and the decline of forests in industrial countries, the continued destruction of forests in developing countries, and evidence of global climate change have all combined to raise the awareness of politicians, planners, and the media to the vital importance of forests in the well-being of nations, and to the knowledge that in our time, the remnants of natural forest ecosystems, with their great diversity of habitats, are in danger of destruction. “~Laurence Roche[7]

plant-in-person-globe-hand

Professor Laurence Roche, B. Agr., M.A., M.F., Ph.D. [October 20, 1927-November 23, 1999] had never met the world renowned silviculturist Richard St. Barbe Baker, however Roche was an avid reader of the books published by Dr. Richard St. Barbe Baker, L.L.D, O.B.E. F.A.I.L., For. Dip. Cantab.,  It was these books, that convinced Laurence Roche to persue a lifetime career in forestry.

Professor Roche born in Wexford, Ireland, had eight siblings. His cousin was the novelist John Banville, and besides devouring works by Baker and novels by Thomas Merton theologian and mystic, Roche was widely read. Considering the same trajectory as Richard St. Barbe Baker, Roche contemplated entering a school of Divinity to become a priest, however Baker’s works inspired Roche to leap feet first, and pursue forestry at Trinity College, Dublin receiving his B.A., B. Agr. [Forestry] in 1960. Roche followed up with a traveling scholarship completing his Masters in Science [1962] and Doctorate from the University of British Columbia [1966].

Roche received postings in both Canada for the Canadian Forest Service and Professor of Forestry and Head, Department of Forestry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Roche embraced a global view following in the footsteps of Richard St. Barbe Baker. Roche advocated that forests were not isolated economic resources for immediate gain. Tropical forests needed to be viewed and assessed in an ecological and social context, and educated African forestry corps to take a lead in safeguarding their forests.

Working alongside John Bene in 1975, they recommended and established programmes on agrisilviculture in developing countries leading to more efficient land use, programmes to improve the lot of rural forest dwellers, by addressing hunger, shelter and degradation of the environment. John Bene, an indefatiguable Canadian forester and inspiring visionary, initiated priorities on tropical forestry research and lead the way to establish the International Centre for Research on Agroforestry (ICRAF) [now known as the Nairobi-based World Agroforestry Centre] in 1977.

“The relationship of populations to their ecosystems is the forest geneticist’s central area of inquiry, and, if he is to gain a fairly complete understanding of these relationships, he must regard the intricate patterns of evolution and coevolution. Therefore, forest genetics engages in ecosystems biology, or, more narrowly, in population biology. ..The environmental conditions that permit a population to survive permanently, and with which this population interacts, today are usually designated as its “ecological niche.” ~Laurence Roche [10]

world-kids-Roche recognized that “almost all tree species studied to date exhibit habitat-correlated, genetically based variation. When the species is distributed over a wide range of environments, variation within a species is often very great. It is this variation, referred to as the genetic resources of the species, which is the basis of evolutionary development, and the starting point for selection and breeding programmes. Such programmes are virtually non-existant for tropical trees. ~ Laurence Roche.[3]”

Following his work with IDRC advisor Bene, to integrate forestry, and agriculture with animal husbandry to optimize tropical forest land use, Roche accepted a position as Professor Department of Forestry and Wood Science, School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, University College of North Wales, Bangor, Gwynedd.

Roche was the founding father of the “Journal of Forest Ecology and Management,” a peer reviewed periodical focusing on the forest ecology interaction with forest management, alongside innovation and research in the fields of biological, ecological and social issues in regards to the management and conservation of natural forests and their biosphere. Forest Ecology and Management is committed to open access bringing forward new ideas and approaches to forest management, and forest ecology.

The spirit and zeal of Professor Roche continued following his retirement. Though settling down in Madaboy, Murroe, Co. Limerick, Ireland, Roche continued to advocate for the tropical forest, making frequent journeys. Roche also provided counsel to the Food and Agricultural Organisation headquartered in Rome. According to Trevor West, Roche was awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre du Mérite Agricole [The Order of Agricultural Merit] in 1991, and was elected an honorary fellow of Trinity College Dublin [TCD] in 1993.

“I had news that an ecological survey was being undertaken in the Sahara, to the North of the Gold Coast, and I learnt that the local tribesmen had been forced by increased desertification to retreat to a small patch of land, the last remaining patch of forest in the area.  There was desert behind them for a thousand miles, and desert to either side of them for a thousand miles, the chiefs had forbidden marriage and the women refused to bear children because the end of the forest was in sight….I was determined that the Kenyans should never have to suffer such an appalling social and ecological disaster.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Forest Ecology and Management  Science to Sustain the World’s Forests Editors-in-Chief: Mark Adams, Dan Binkley, Todd S. Fredericksen, Jean-Paul Laclau, Harri Mäkinen, Cindy E. Prescott, Yowhan Son

2. Major figure in Third World Forestry Sat. Dec. 4, 1999. The Irish Times.

3. Roche, Laurence. Conserving Endangered Tree Species. The Road to Extinction: Problems of Categorizing the Status of Taxa Threatened with Extinction : Proceedings of a Symposium Held by the Species Survival Commission, Madrid, 7 and 9 November 1984
IUCN conservation library International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
Editors Richard Fitter, Maisie Fitter Contributors International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. Species Survival Commission, United Nations Environment Programme  Edition illustrated. Publisher IUCN, 1987. ISBN 2880329299, 9782880329297

4. Roche, Laurence. Neglected value of green city lungs New Scientist. 8 Sep 1977. Vol. 75, No. 1068. ISSN 0262-4079

5. Roche, Laurence. Report on trhree weeks consultancy in Forest Genetics Resources Conservation, Brazil. Consultant Final Report IICA/Embrapa-Procensul II Publisher Bib. Orton IICA / CATIE. JUne 254-July 14, 1987.

6. Roche, L. Gene Resource Conservation International Union of Forestry Research Organisations (IUFRO) Working Party S2.02.2 L. Roche. Head Department of Forestry University of Ibada, Nigeria.

7. Roche, Laurence “The Profession of Forestry Now and in the Year 2000.” The Commonwealth Forestry Review, vol. 71, no. 1, 1992, pp. 13–19. JSTOR, JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/42608498.

8. Roche, Laurence The Professional Forester and the Farmer: One Man’s Experience.” The International Forestry Review, vol. 1, no. 2, 1999, pp. 112–114. JSTOR, JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/42609155.

9. Roche, Laurence The Silvicultural Significance of Geographic Variation in the White Engelmann Spruce Complex in British Columbia
The Forestry Chronicle, 1970, 46(2): 116-125, https://doi.org/10.5558/tfc46116-2

10. Stern, Dr. Klaus and Laurence Roche. Genetics of Forest Ecosystems
Volume 6 of Ecological Studies
Edition illustrated. Publisher Springer Science & Business Media, 2012. ISBN 3642655173, 9783642655173. Page 1 and 3.

11. West, Trevor. Roche, Laurence . Dictionary of Irish Biography. Cambridge University Press.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

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F.I.A.L., For.Dip.Cantab.

“Always the more beautiful answers, who ask the more difficult questions.” e.e. cummings.

A puzzle was posed on Carve your legacy, Evokes curiosity.  The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has as its namesake, Dr. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., Hon. LL.D. (Sask), F.I.A.L., For.Dip.Cantab., A.C.F.

Carve your legacy, Evokes curiosity resolved many of the honourifics, and postnomial letters.  However what did F.I.A.L., and For.Dip.Cantab. mean?  That was the curiouser, and curioser poser.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

At first glance, and knowing the history of Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, the founder of the International organization “Men of the Trees” now known as the “International Tree Foundation” it first appeared that it may have something to do with forestry, an honour or a group. However….

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better.
It’s not.”– Dr. Seuss

A letter arrived from Dawn at the Saskatoon Public Library “Ask Us” reference service resolving the conundrum.

By searching in the 1974 edition of the “Who’s Who” directory, a listing was posted for Baker, Richard St. Barb, FIAL.  The abbreviations cited for the “Who’s Who” directory gave the definition that FIAL stands for “Fellow of the International Institute of Arts and Letters.”

Now then, according to The Trustees of the San Luigi Charitable Trust, “The Institute of Arts and Letters, London, is a small and exclusive learned society, based in England’s capital but with an international membership, devoted to the study of the arts and letters in their broadest sense, and to the promotion of humanitarian and philanthropic endeavour.”

Fellows of the Institute are limited to a 50-member honour society, who remain elected for life, and may attach the postnomial letters F.I.A.L. An existing fellow, puts forward an exemplary candidate, and this nomination goes before the society in a peer review.

If one was to speak of an agile mind, the concept of having a quick resourceful and adaptable character would come to the forefront.

Further to this the staff at the Saskatoon Public Library discovered that in regards to the abbreviations ~ “For. Dip. Cantab.” that the abbreviation Cantab. stands for Cambridge University. And then the “Who’s Who” Almanac, again confirmed this abbreviation with the definition “Forestry Diploma, Cantab., 1920”.

There has been historically the Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students, Graduates and Holders of Office at the University of Cambridge, from the Earliest Times to 1900 is a biographical register of former members of the University of Cambridge which was edited by John Venn (1834–1923) and his son John Archibald Venn (1883–1958) and published by Cambridge University Press in ten volumes between 1922 and 1953.  However, it ends at 1900, and Richard St. Barbe Baker graduated 1920.

According to Ruth Wright Millar, author of Saskatchewan Heroes, and Rogues, Richard St. Barbe Baker enrolled in forestry programmes at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University, graduating in 1920. St Barbe set off with these papers in hand, as the Colonial Office assigned to St. Barbe a posting in Kenya as Assistant Conservator of Forests (ACF).

The puzzle is solved with a bit of “study and a quick and agile response!

“Yesterday was the happiest day of my life. Every new day that follows the previous day is happier and what better than this I can wish for my friend.  “I wish you health and strength of an oak, the long life of a redwood.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Thank you very kindly. The Saskatoon Public Library provides a most excellent “Ask Us” reference service, indeed. As Gertrude Stein says, “Silent gratitude isn’t very much to anyone.

Roses in appreciation of Volunteers upporters and sponsors of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Clean up, Saskatoon, SK, CA
Roses in appreciation

Feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a present and not giving it. William Arthur Ward

“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.” – Albert Einstein

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

“Any success for which I have been given credit has been the result of teamwork.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

St. Barbe’s Vision

How did Alan Grainger describe Richard St. Barbe Baker?  “Richard St. Barbe Baker was a giant of a man, like the redwood trees he loved so much.  He thought big, he lived long, and some would even say he talked long too.”  Dr. Alan Grainger, Senior Lecturer Global Change and Policy,  School of Geography, Faculty of Environment Unversity of Leeds, UK

There were six characteristics integrated into Richard St. Barbe’s vision according to Alan Grainger.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

 

1/ Planetary scale.  Richard St. Barbe Baker founded the Men of the Trees Twahamwe in 1922 [now known as the International Tree Foundation].  After 1940, St. Barbe Baker organised international World Forestry Charter gatherings seeking global initiatives in response to forestry and environmental problems.

Planet Earth, the World, is in our Hands
Planet Earth, the World, is in our Hands

2/ Historical perspective.

“The trees worked for millions of years to make it possible for man to come on this planet.  Yet, man, who owes his presence on this Earth to trees, has been cutting, burning, greedily and recklessly.  He has turned the forest to desert, until today we are faced not only with a timber famine, but with a food famine.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker.

3/ Man’s tendency to over exploit the land, clearing forests, and taking too much from the land

“If man loses one third of his skin he dies; if a tree loses one third of its bark, it too dies.  If the earth is a sentient being, would it not be reasonable to expect that if it loses one third of its trees and vegetative covering, it will also die?

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are preforming vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature.  Its presence is essential to earth as an organism.  It is the first condition of all life, it is the ‘skin’ of the Earth, for without it there can be no water, and , therefore, no life.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

4/ The recognition on the planet of two spheres the first being vegetation and animal life, and how this biosphere interacts with the second sphere, that of humanity.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

5/ Mankind’s responsibility to care for his home, this planet Earth, and its biosphere.

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. In doing so, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilized world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

6/ Forests maintain the environmental stability for the global wellness of the world.  Forests have their own characteristics.

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s creation, this beautiful Earth.  The ancients believed that the Earth was a sentient being, and felt the behaviour of mankind upon it.  As we have no prrof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible people to accept this point of view and act accordingly.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Richard St. Barbe Baker’s philosophy blended together the diversity of Nature with human advancement, spirituality and technological advances.  St Barbe was a pioneer, often referred to as a man ahead of his era, seeking a unified world vision to safeguard the forests of the earth, appreciate and enhance Nature’s beauty and bounty “encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain”.  “In communion with our fellow man, and tree-wise, strive to make the Earth more fruitful again.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker

“when the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“If the armies of the world now numbering 22 million could be redeployed in planting in the desert, in eight years a 100 million people could be rehabilitated and supplied with protein rich food, grown from virgin sand. If we could accept the challenge, and make that a One World Purpose, this would unite East and West and be the scientfic and physical answer to this world’s dilemma.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker”

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

Carve your legacy, Evokes curiosity

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has as its namesake, Dr. Lt. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., Hon. LL.D. (Sask), F.I.A.L., For.Dip.Cantab., ACF

National Archives [Kew] does state that “senior” or first lieutenant [Lt] Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, serving in the Royal Horse and Field Artillery did receive the Military Cross [M.C.] for service in World War I, and that St. Barbe also served as  “junior” or second lieutenant [2LT].

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

Following service in the war, Colonial Office appointed Baker Assistant Conservator of Forests in 1920 with a post in Kenya.  This was followed with a posting as Assistant Conservator of Forests [ACF] in Nigeria.

In 1971, the University of Saskatchewan bestowed upon Richard St. Barbe Baker, LL.D. an honorary Doctorate of Laws.

Richard St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E. also received the Order of the British Empire from Queen Elizabeth in 1977.

  1. The puzzle which evokes curiosity is this ~ what does the acronym F.A.I.L. stand for? [Note should be F.I.A.L.]
  2. The second puzzle of Richard St. Barbe’s legacy is what do the abbreviations For.Dip.Cantab. mean?

F.I.A.L., For.Dip.Cantab. reveals the answer to the conundrum

“I don’t want to be a product of my environment. I want my environment to be a product of me.” Frank Costello

Carve your legacy. Alpha Omega
Carve your legacy. Alpha Omega

Carve your name on hearts, not tombstones. A legacy is etched into the minds of others and the stories they share about you.” Shannon L. Alder

 Bibliography

Momen, Wendi and Voykovic, Anthony A.  “Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker”  Bahá’í Encyclopedia Project, bahai-encyclopedia-project.org

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

“The point I’m making with John Lennon is: a man could look at anything, and make something out of it.”Frank Costello

Afforestation Year End Review

img_0229“A man has made at least a start on discovering the meaning of human life when he plants shade trees under which he knows full well he will never sit.” – Elton Trueblood

What is the history of 2017  for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? Find the year end round up for 2017 in the SOS Elms Coalition December edition year end 2017 Newsletter!

 The SOS in SOS Elms Coalition now stands for Save Our Saskatchewan (elms). When the organization founded the acronym stood for Save Our Saskatoon (elms).  ” In its advocacy role, SOS Elms acts as a citizen watchdog of government agencies striving for policy change and responsible management of urban forests.”

“…today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own
day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain
the green glory of the forests of the earth.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms.  Not only do the Elms of Saskatchewan need public education and awareness in the light of Dutch Elm Disease but never before has the urban forest been more necessary.  This problem is not new—most people are familiar with how chestnut blight and Dutch elm disease eliminated these species from our landscapes—but the pace at which new pests are being introduced is new,’ Cary Institute forest ecologist Gary Lovett notes. ‘People don’t realize the grave threat these invaders present to whole species and ecosystems.’”  Sian M. Hunter from  Invasive pests threaten our northern forests

If a tree dies, plant another in its place. – Carolus Linnaeus

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees.  As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” Richard St. Barbe Baker‘

Elm Leaves
Elm Leaves

“Trees are poems that the earth writes upon the sky.”
― Kahlil Gibran

On these cold nights, laying under cozy blankets with hot chocolate – contemplate these words  “Every morning when I wake up I say to myself ‘This may be my last day on earth, have I got my priorities r i g h t ? ‘ “~Richard St. Barbe Baker .

White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)
White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

“Trees, forests, and other forms of life – you have not inherited them from your forefathers, you have borrowed them from your children yet to be born. Their preservation, their enrichment, is the solemn responsibility you bear.”
― Native American teachings

Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus)

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

Richard St. Barbe Baker | Landscapes Paysages

“During my time in Saskatchewan,
I felt closer than ever to this
extraordinary man.”

Camilla Allen. The Man of the Trees. Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

In the Canadian Association of Landscape Architects periodical “Landscapes Paysages” invention, vol 19, no 4 is found the article written by the University of Sheffield student, Camilla Allen about Richard St. Barbe Baker.  As Allen states, “During my time in Saskatchewan, I felt closer than ever to this extraordinary man” and she expounds upon Baker’s devotion to his work, to trees around the world.

During Allen’s visit to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, she had the opportunity to visit the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker homestead site near Beaver Creek. Allen spent time at the Meewasin Valley Authority Centre perusing the interpretive centre display, and delved into the Richard St. Barbe Baker Fonds at the University of Saskatchewan Library Special Collections and Archives. Allen had the good fortune of meeting both Paul Hanley, best selling author of “Eleven” and former Environmental Columnist for the Saskatoon Star Phoenix and Robert White,  both of whom knew Richard St. Barbe Baker  personally and knew him as St Barbe, a good friend.

Wishing Allen the best of success with her thesis, the subject of which is Richard St. Barbe Baker, founder of the International Tree Foundation in the year 1924

A man, to succeed, must possess the necessary equanimity of temperament to conceive an idea, the capacity to form it into some tangible shape, the ingenuity to put it into practical operation, the ability to favorably impress others with its merits, and the power of will that is absolutely necessary to force it to success.Thomas A. Scott

Thank you to Verity Moore-Wright from the Meewasin Valley Authority in regards to notification about this article appearing in the periodical “Landscapes Paysages”

we wait for the sunrise of our awakening to the realisation of our kinship with the earth and all living things.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven. And learn tranquility.
” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

“Biography is the literature of realized personality, of life as it has been lived, of actual achievements or shortcomings, of success or failure; it is not imaginary and embellished, not what might be or might have been, not reduced to prescribed or artificial forms, but it is the unvarnished story of that which was delightful, disappointing, possible, or impossible, in a life spent in this world. ” ~James Boswell

Healing Nations 

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood
And I, I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.”
– Robert Frost

November   17 – Take A Hike Day

“Hiking is a bit like life:  The journey only requires you to put one foot in front of the other…again and again and again.  And if you allow yourself the opportunity to be present throughout the entirety of the trek, you will witness beauty every step of the way, not just at the summit” unknown

How will you celebrate Take a Hike day?

“Entering the world of the spirit, I saw a vision which I could not adequately describe if I lived for a thousand years. The central part was a broad highway lined with beautiful trees radiating all the colors of the rainbow. Each tree bore all the fruits known to me and many others I had never seen before. The nine-pointed star was situated at the end of the road and drew me towards it and in the distance there were parks and gardens with rare trees from many countries and friends of all colors and creeds. Dominating the garden of delight was The Tree of Life with leaves for the healing of the Nations.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉