Look deep into nature

Evolution is a tightly coupled dance, with life and the material environment as partners. From the dance emerges the entity Gaia.
James Lovelock

A forest ecology is a delicate one. If the forest perishes, its fauna may go with it. The athshean word for world is also the word for forest.

Ursula K. Le Guin

Since 1970, Earth Day supports environmental protection,  and was supported by the  2016 acknowledging the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference historic draft climate protection treaty.  Earth Day was first celebrated on the first day of spring (northern hemisphere) March 21, 1970, however, United States Senator Gaylord Nelson initiated Earth Day on April 22 in America.  March for Science is also commemorated April 22, and the People’s Climate Mobilization follows on April 29.

“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”-John Muir

Paul D. Tinari organized Canada’s Earth Day September 11, 1980 during Earth Day Week beginning Sept 6, 1980.

Trees have a way of bringing people together to celebrate a shared heritage. With over 80% of Canadians living in cities and towns, our urban forests are vital to our quality of life, and this recognition will go a long way toward ensuring that they continue to be planted and cared for in urban locations… For every person who stops and thinks about how they can help grow and maintain trees, Canada becomes a cleaner, better country.Cision Canada

The United Nations celebrates International Mother Earth Day on April 22 “to remind each of us that the Earth and its Ecosystems provide us with life and sustenance….The Earth and its ecosystems are our home. In order to achieve a just balance among the economic, social, and environmental needs of present and future generations, it is necessary to promote harmony with nature and the Earth.”

“Look deep into nature and you will understand everything better.”-Einstein

in 1922, Richard St. Barbe Baker began the International Tree Foundation with Forest Guides, or Forest Scouts, called the Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees who… “promised before N’gai, the High God, that they would protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.”

“Earth laughs in flowers.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

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A free biokit for your forest walk

On Saturday, March 30, 2019 please celebrate “Take a Walk in the Park Day.” Before you head out, take a moment to plan a family activity to care for Canada’s rich biodiversity, and to increase the education and awareness of conservation, eco-systems, and Canada’s living resources.

Download a BioKit before going on your family outing at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. It is very fortunate that the BioKits are developed by the Biosphere, Environment Museum. These nature observation guides are designed for youth over six years old to become aware of the environment and natural treasures as you explore. the West Swale wetlands and associated riparian woodlands. Become immersed in the mysteries of nature, and take part in the activities outlined in the variety of Bio-Kits available.

“Biodiversity, or biological diversity, means the multitude of living beings, ecosystems and their interrelationships, in space and in time. It is divided into three components: genetic diversity, species diversity, and ecosystem diversity.”Source

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Bio Kit Activity Guide for Educators

Bio-Kit FAQ Government of Canada. About Environment and Climate Change. Canada Services. The Biosphere. BioKits. Explore the Bio-Kits. Pan-Canadian BioKits. Bio-Kit Frequently Asked Questions

Explore Canada The Great Trail PhoneApp

Nature Bio Kit Government of Canada. About Environment and Climate Change. Canada Services. The Biosphere. BioKits. Explore the Bio-Kits. Pan-Canadian BioKits. Nature BioKit

Trans Canada Trail Bio-Kit Government of Canada. About Environment and Climate Change. Canada Services. The Biosphere. BioKits. Explore the Bio-Kits. Pan-Canadian BioKits. Trans Canada Trail Bio-Kit.

Urban Bio Kit Government of Canada. About Environment and Climate Change. Canada Services. The Biosphere. BioKits. Explore the Bio-Kits. Pan-Canadian BioKits. Urban Bio Kit.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

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I believe in oneness of mankind and of all living things and in the interdependence of each and all. I believe that unless we play fair to the Earth, we cannot exist physically on this planet. Unless we play fair to our neighbour, we cannot exist socially or internationally. Unless we play fair to better self, there is no individuality and no leadership. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

The circle of compassion

World Wildlife Day ~ March 3

Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.~Albert Einstein

The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) decided to proclaim 3 March, the day of the adoption of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), as World Wildlife Day.

“The preservation of animal and plant life, and of the general beauty of Nature, is one of the foremost duties of the men and women of to-day. No man has a right, either moral or legal, to destroy or squander an inheritance of his children that he holds for them in trust.

Wild life can be saved! The means by which it can be saved are: Money, labor and publicity.

Every possible means of preservation,—sentimental, educational and legislative,—must be employed. It is an imperative duty, because it must be performed at once, for otherwise it will be too late, speaks William T. Hornaday Sc.D., Director of the New York Zoologial Park, Author of “The American Natural History” and ex-president of the American Bison Society.

Do you know what Saskatchewan endangered wildlife species look like? Do you know what their habitat looks like? Do the flora and fauna listed here require wetlands, tall grasslands, arid plains, riparian woodlands, or mixed zones?  Do you know the range in Saskatchewan where you may see these endangered species of Saskatchewan ~ north, south central, east, west?  Today is the day for you, personally, to find out before it is too late!  Can you identify the flora and fauna in the semi-wilderness wildlife habitat of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area of the city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan?

  • Burrowing Owl Athene cunicularia
  • Piping Plover Charadrius melodus
  • Sage Grouse Centrocercus urophasianus
  • Whooping Crane Grus americana
  • Swift Fox Vulpes velox
  • Sand Verbena Abronia micrantha
  • Western Spiderwort Tradescantia occidentalis
  • Tiny Cryptanthe Cryptantha minima
  • Hairy Prairie-clover Dalea villosa

Saskatchewan Wildlife at Risk:

Biodiversity; Species at Risk Government of Saskatchewan. About Environment, Programs and services.

Biodiversity Saskatchewan Species at Risk. Saskatchewan Econet.

Ecology Camps for Kids University of Saskatchewan.

Fauna of Saskatchewan Wikipedia.

Floraof Saskatchewan Wikipedia.

List of Mammals in Saskatchewan Wikipedia.

Outdoor Education : Species at Risk Regina Public Schools

Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference. Feb 16 17 18 2016 Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan
(SK PCAP)

S.O.S. Stewards of Saskatchewan Nature Saskatchewan.

Wildlife Viewing Tourism Saskatchewan.

Wild plants and animals protected. Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management Minister Lorne Scott. Government of Saskatchewan. March 3, 1999

I believe in oneness of mankind and of all living things and in the interdependence of each and all. I believe that unless we play fair to the Earth, we cannot exist physically on this planet. Unless we play fair to our neighbour, we cannot exist socially or internationally. Unless we play fair to better self, there is no individuality and no leadership. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.~Albert Einstein

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’” ~ Richard St Barbe Baker

Biodiversity and the last species

“…there is nothing more sacred than the pact between humans and the land that gives them their food.  Janine Benyus.” (Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti)

“journeys of … eco-municipalities towards sustainability also teach that there are no package solutions toward this goal.  Each community and each actor within that community must find the particular path that fits that local terrain and situation.”Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

“[We] do not really know what we are losing when we lose species.  Some ecologists have likened the loss of biodiversity to an airplane flight during which we continually pull out rivets as the plane cruises along.  How many rivets can we pull out before disaster occurs?” Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

One of the signposts along the path include a guiding local vision.  Saskatoon has undertaken its vision or journey of growth to half a million people with the YXEGreenStrategy,  and Saskatoon’s Strategic Growth Plan which includes seven strategic goals.

“Eco-municipalities have educated thousands of their employees about unsustainable environmental and social trends and the reasons why new local practices are essential for helping to change these trends.  These municipalities have engaged community citizens – sometimes, entire villages – in planning and revitalization initiatives toward sustainability.  These community initiatives have found locally suited ways to reduce use of fossil fuels, metals and minerals, chemicals, encroachment upon nature, and to meet human and community needs fairly and efficiently.”Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

“What you people call your natural resources, our people call our relatives” ~ Orien Lyons, faith keeper of the Onondaga.

“Many of us are aware that having open space, woodlands, babbling brooks, and singing birds nearby contributes to our quality of life.  What we often forget, though, is that these aspects of nature are also our life-support system.  Without enough oxygen to breathe, without enough green plants to support our food system, without enough potable water, there would be no us.” Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

“The great biologist E.O. Wilson has said…”the question I am asked most frequently about the diversity of life [is]: if enough species are extinguished, will the ecosystems collapse, and will the extinction of most other species follow soon afterward?  The only answer anyone can give is, possibly.  By the time we find out, however, it might be too late.  One planet, one experiment.”  Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

Please read the following long range planning reports and how they relate to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park.

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and those land areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation areas and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Bibliography.

James, Sarah and Torbjörn Lahti.  The Natural Step for Communities. How Cities and Towns can change to sustainable practices.  ISBN 0-86571-491-6.  New Society Publishers.  Gabriola Island, B.C. 2004.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Coyotes: how to co-exist peacefully

Entering the forest means you are entering a semi-wilderness habitat.  You are entering the homes of many species of wild animals, this is what is absolutely wonderful about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park. “Forests are home to 80% of the world’s terrestrial biodiversity.~Arkive

“Successful green intervention is a negotiated settlement within a community,” says Dr. Eric Strauss, executive director for the Center for Urban Resilience, “Communities need to decide not what green spaces or animals they want, but what ecosystem services they want from their green space.
It’s mating season right now for coyotes Canis latrans.  Naturalist Kevin Cantelon provides some hints for living in harmony with coyotes.  If you own a large dog, a coyote may respond very protectively of its territory, and defend it’s den.  As with any wild animal, a parent coyote will defend its pups, and both male and female coyotes share in raising the litter.  Breeding season will also spike the coyote’s hunger.  A small dog may be seen as potential food for the pack, and a housecat is a treat.  For these reasons, if you are walking in an unfenced area, it is wise to keep your dogs onleash to reduce conflict with coyotes.
“Coyotes usually breed in February; litters of 5-7 pups (maximum 19) are born 60-63 days later (April to early May) in a den,” says C. S. Churcher, “Breeding begins at one year, and coyotes mate for life.” So, the mating season, sees an increase risk to your dog during this time of year.  Midwest Outdoors notes, that it is important to “spay or neuter your pet. Coyotes are attracted to and can mate with unspayed or unneutered domestic dogs. Unspayed female dogs in season can attract male coyotes.  Un-neutered male dogs can be lured away by the scent of a female coyote in her ovulation cycle.  Male dogs can be lured by the female coyote’s scent and killed by male coyotes.”
During breeding season, Jaymi Heimbuch reminds us also, “Coyotes that usually avoid any confrontation with humans or dogs will display more territorial behaviors, warning passers-by with vocalizations or even following them. And coyotes that would normally scamper off when chased by an off-leash dog will more likely stand its ground.”
Midwest Outdoors adds these precautions “Keep unattended cats and dogs indoors or in completely enclosed runs, especially at night, and do not assume that a fence will keep a coyote out of your back yard.
* Accompany your leashed pet outside.
* Keep dogs on short leashes while walking outside; the Division of Wildlife recommends a leash no longer than six feet.
* Leave noisemakers on hand to scare away coyotes that may enter your yard, such as whistles and horns.
* Yell, clap hands, blow a whistle and try to make yourself look larger if you have a close encounter with a coyote.” 
Cantelon noted, that if you do encounter a coyote, “Make them uncomfortable, throw a stick at them and haze them to make them not welcome.  And they will learn to stay away very, very quickly.”
“How can we have happy coyotes? …We have to learn how to make space for each other. We need cross-species diplomacy.” says  Stella Tarnay, an urban planner and co-founder of Biophilic DC, a group that works to make cities better habitats for animals and people.
Shara-Lynn Morrison noted that “The coyote gets your dog to chase him and then somewhere in the distance the pack waits for your dog.”  Your dog will act to defend you, and the coyote pack will be defending their pack, and their territory.  The government of Manitoba states coyotes”can be seen anytime of the day but are most active at night as they search for food and defend their territory from other coyotes. Often considered a predator of larger animals such as deer or livestock, coyotes will also scavenge on dead animals and eat insects, rodents, rabbits and songbirds. They are also known to kill or injure pets, especially small dogs or cats.  Coyotes have an annual home range of about 20 square kilometres
Churcher mentions that the Coyote diet consists “chiefly on rabbits and rodents, but they also consume insects, fruits and human waste.”  That being said, it is important to scoop your poop, if walking in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, the South West Off Leash Recreation Area, or George Genereux Urban Regional Park.  Animals are also attracted to feces.

Cities are nature. “We have this idea that there’s the urban world and there’s nature. We’re the only species that looks at landscape that way,” said Dr. Eric Strauss, executive director for the Center for Urban Resilience… “We changed this landscape. It’s all still nature, it’s just not nature as we remember it.”

“Here’s what the city [of Saskatoon] recommends you do during a close encounter with a coyote:

  • Never approach the animal
  • Look for a way out
  • Be observant of the coyote’s movement
  • Act assertive, yell and wave your arms
  • Ensure the animal has an escape route and enough space to flee the situation
  • Keep pets on a leash and under control

Tips to avoid a coyote encounter in your yard:

  • Never feed coyotes or leave food waste in accessible areas
  • Do not put meat, eggs, or dairy in compost bins
  • Seal off access to decks and other sheltered spaces in your yard
  • If you feed your pets outdoors, bring the food in at night
  • Close the gate to your yard and make sure fencing is in good condition

People can call pest management at 306-975-3300 with questions and concerns.”

Coyotes play a role in biodiversity, and its an important one. Lincoln Julie, Calgary Parks

If you find an injured coyote, Mass Audubon states, remember, “sick or injured animals can be unpredictable and dangerous, especially those susceptible to the rabies virus (including coyotes). If you find a coyote in either condition stay away from it and do not attempt to handle it or move it.” “Coyotes suffer from diseases such as canine distemper, rabies, canine hepatitis, and parvo virus”. Living Sky Wildlife Rehabilitation has some excellent tips in case a wild animal is found.  For more questions call (306) 242-7177.

Coyote Watch Canada also has excellent tips for coexisting with coyotes.

“Supervise your pets and keep them under strict control. Adhering to leash by-laws, accompanying pets on walks, and not allowing them to roam is in the best interests of your pets. Our pets are at risk of many environmental dangers when they are not under our control: owls, eagles, hawks, foxes and coyotes can all prey on smaller pets. Cats are safest indoors or in secure outdoor play enclosures. Domestic dogs can be considered competition for food items at locations where humans are feeding coyotes, and coyotes may prey on small domestic animals for food or to eliminate a threat to their territory or pups.

  • Neuter your pets. Although a rare occurrence, coyotes may mate with domesticated dogs.
  • Do not approach coyotes, their dens or their pups, even if it appears the parents have abandoned them. Coyotes will do their best to avoid human contact, but may attack humans when provoked, sick or injured.
  • Teach children about wildlife and how to safely respond to a coyote (or dog) nearby.
  • Respect, compassion and education are common sense tools that nurture safe and healthy human and wildlife families.
  • Yelling in a firm voice while outdoors “Go away coyote!”, banging pots, spraying a water hose (in warmer months), throwing objects towards not at the coyote, using a shake can, popping open an umbrella can be effective deterrents to safely move a coyote away.
  • **Use hazing techniques such as shaking car keys, popping an umbrella, throwing an object in the direction of the coyote such as clumps of dirt, sticks or blow a whistle. Review and download our Keeping Coyotes Away Pamphlet Be prepared and aware of your surroundings when enjoying the outdoors. Be a good visitor “leave no trace”. Carry out leftover food, garbage and dog feces.

How to identify if a coyote is in the area?  Government of Manitoba, notes coyote sign such as coyote tracks, coyote scats, and pets that are fearful or barking uncontrollably. “Coyotes commonly howl or “yip” to communicate to each other and urinate frequently to mark their territory.” The Commonwealth of Massachusetts says, “Coyotes howl because:

  • They’re telling non-family members to stay out of their territory.
  • They’re locating their family members within their territory.
  • They’re advertising for a mate during breeding season.
  • Pups practice howling and can be especially vocal in late summer as they attempt to mimic their parents.
  • When there is a potential threat towards the pups, adult coyotes will scatter and howl in order to distract the threat away from the den site.”

“If there is an introduction of wild systems into the city, there needs to be an education that nature is harsh and one needs to be careful with it,” Susannah Drake says.“In the same way kids in the city are taught to look both ways before crossing the street, there are dangerous situations you learn about and become aware of.”

Heimbuch sums it up coyote mating season succinctly, “Coyote attacks on humans are rare, and there have been only two fatal attacks in modern history, in 1981 and 2009. Urban Coyote Research reports, “In almost a third of the reported attack cases, it was known that coyotes were being fed (either intentionally or accidentally) near the attack site. One victim was bitten while feeding a coyote and another was bitten by a coyote that was being fed by her parents.” So it appears there is often a human cause to the bites in the first place.

…So, if it helps assuage fears of neighborhood coyotes, a child is far more likely to be bitten by a domestic dog than by a coyote when out playing in the neighborhood.

That said, it is only smart to know about coyotes and their behavior so that you can continue to coexist peacefully with these wild urban residents.

Mass Audubon says, “Coyotes are wary animals who will avoid people at all costs,” and remember to never, never leave food out for coyotes, and this includes dropped dog treats, and dog feces.  Scoop your poop!

Life is as dear to a mute creature as it is to man. Just as one wants happiness and fears pain, just as one wants to live and not die, so do other creatures. ~His Holiness The Dalai Lama

If you have men who will exclude any of God’s creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity, you will have men who will deal likewise with their fellow men. ~St. Francis of Assisi

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to donations to protect the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Governance and Finance, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Nature depaves. Why don’t we?

“Depaving while rebuilding”~Richard Register

That’s crazy, have you ever heard of such a concept?  Would that be like greenscape or greyscape?

So technically, Richard Register, goes on to say, “The inescapable conclusion about access and transportation is that we have built an immensely destructive transportation infrastructure and need to create access in a different way. ”

A different way?  Hmmm?  Have you ever heard of such a thing before?

“That this implies is tearing up the asphalt and rolling back sprawl; organizing the community, buying the seedlings, breaking out the sledge hammers, warming up the muscles, and firing up the bulldozers – on our side this time.”~ Richard Register

We are close to 8 billion persons on the world right now, and by 2055 the earth will feature 10 billion persons and 11 billion in the year 2088.  Saskatoon, well this city is at 246,376, and is the largest city in the province of Saskatchewan and features a Census Metropolitan Area of 295,095.  Well, by 2032, this number for the city should change to 450,000 around 2032 and one million by 2063.  “The Blairmore Suburban Development Area (SDA) currently has land sufficient for eight future neighbourhoods and approximately 50,000 to 70,000 people within its boundaries”~Blairmore Sector Plan Report Richard St. Barbe Baker AFforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park are both included in the Blairmore Sector Report according to city long range planners.

“Nature depaves.” ~Richard Register

Isn’t that a unique sentence. Short, just like that, “nature depaves.”

” ~Richard Register

That is an interesting question.

“We need not only to stop new paving, but to being depaving what should never have been paved in the first place.”~Richard Register.

Isn’t that a unique statement. Register goes on to relate that “A major roadway was recently removed from the side of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon, and replaced with a riverside walk and park….In the suburbs of St. Paul, Minnesota, in an area called Phalen Village, a failed shopping center and its enormous parking lot have been bulldozed to restore a lake filled forty years aso…Says Torstenson [ St. Paul City staff planner ], ‘It always wanted to be a lake, even after it was paved. Water collected in the parking lot during rains and stayed for days, and by the end a few cattails were pushing through the asphalt even before the bulldozers came back. One day last fall I saw ducks floating in the rain puddle in the middle of the parking lot near those reeds. The lake was insisting on coming back.’ One old timer in Phalen village told him, ‘I was there fishing when the first dump truck arrived. Never should have filled that lake in the first place.'”

“Depaving while rebuilding”~Richard Register

Bibliography:

Register, Richard. Ecocities.  Rebuilding Cities in Balance with Nature.  ISBN-10:0-86571-552-1. ISBN-13: 978-0-96571-552-3.  New Society Publishers.  2006

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

The Best Soil Worker

World Soil Day
5 December 2018

WorldSoilDayLogo

“As long as a soil is covered with forest, its humus is maintained. The basic forest problem lies in its composition and regeneration. In the forest the process of decay and growth always balance one another. The vegetable wastes together with the by-products of the animal population form a mixture on the forest floor. As we examine this mixture from time to time we find it remains practically constant in depth, in spite of annual additions from leaf-fall that take place. This mixture is drawn upon at an even rate by earthworms, fungi and bacteria, and the resulting humus in turn is absorbed by the soil and provides the trees and under growth with the food materials they require. Thus the forest manures itself and with the help of the earthworms and other animal distributes this manure through the upper layers of the soil. Everything is done by Nature quietly and efficiently. No artificial fertilizers, no selective weed killers, no pesticides and no machinery are needed in the household of the natural forest.~Richard St. Barbe Baker My Life My Trees

Are you planning to have an event on soils?

Put your event on the map

Spread the word on the importance of soils using our campaign materials. Download posters, banners and logos in multiple languages.

“The worm is the best farm worker. Darwin told us all there was to know about the life history of the worm. But what he didn’t teach us is how to harness the worm. And this I’ve been trying to do for the past forty years. To teach people how to use the worm on their farms and in their gardens by helping them to increase the humus, aerate the soil. And on the fringe of the Sahara and in Israel where I started planting trees over fifty years ago, we put a stone or a couple of stones for every tree on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho in our plantations in the Judean hills. And if a goat knocked a stone off, the tree would die.

“The stone is there to water the tree; this is what we call stone mulching or top mulching. The stone draws down the heat and it draws up the heat from below and draws up the moisture and will protect the worm. The worm will come up and down, and enjoy a cool night under the stone in the moisture that is accumulated under the stone. And in the morning the worm goes down again.

“If you pick up that stone you’ll see two or three worms just underneath, all in the cool and damp. But what is not generally understood is that you can’t have superphosphate and worms. The worms don’t like the superphosphate or any of the chemicals or weed killers and things you put on the crops now, these selective killers. You have to make up your mind whether you’re going to harness the worm or you’re going to work for the chemical merchant.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5  To support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“It is not the land itself that constitutes the farmer’s wealth, but it is in the constituents of the soil, which serve for the nutrition of plants, that this wealth truly consists.”—Liebig.