Mankind as steward of the biosphere

“Man’s life, in sickness and in health, is bound up with the forces of nature, and that nature, so far from being opposed and conquered, must rather be treated as an ally and friend, whose ways must be understood, and whose counsel must be respected.” ~Lewis Mumford. Page vii

“In the selection of areas intrinsically suitable for conservation, the factors selected were: features of historic value, high quality forests and marshes, bay beaches, streams, water-associated wildlife habitats, intertidal wildlife habitats, unique geological and physiographic features, scenic land and water features, and scarce ecological associations. “Page 107

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park, both provide historic value, high quality forests, unique geological features, scenic land, and scarce ecological associations.  Though, both are classified as wetlands, the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area features the permanent wetland of the Chappell Marsh with its water-associated wildlife habitats.

“The salient factors selected for determining recreation areas are:

Passive

  • Unique Physiographic Features
  • Scenic water features, streams
  • Features of historic value
  • High-quality forests
  • High-quality marshes
  • Scenic land features
  • Unique geologic features
  • Scarce ecological associations
  • Water-associated wildlife habitats
  • Field and forest wildlife habitats

Active

  • Bay beaches
  • Expanse of water for pleasure craft
  • Fresh water areas
  • Riparian lands
  • Flat land
  • Existing and potential recreation areas

Areas most suited for urbanization are determined separately for the two components of urbanization: residential and commercial-industrial developments.” Page 112

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park are both existing and potential recreation areas, are very much flat lands, feature field and forest wildlife habitats, comprise unique physiographic features, encompass high-quality forests, features of historic value, and unique geologic features.  The West Swale is a unique Pleistocene event which is unique and separate from the North East Swale. 

The most restrictive factors which are common to these developments are also identified:

  • Slopes
  • Forested areas
  • Poor surface drainage
  • Areas susceptible to erosion
  • Areas susceptible to flooding.” Page 113

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park are both areas susceptible to flooding, and both are amazing forested areas.  Learn more as the City of Saskatoon, and surrounding area  developed by the Partnership for Growth P4G partners moves forward to grow to 1/2 million. P4G is made up of a collaboration between the Cities of Saskatoon, Martensville and Warman, the Town of Osler and the RM of Corman Park #344.  “After much consultation with the public and their own administration, the City of Saskatoon approved its official Growth Plan to Half a Million.”~Kelly Macsymic Commercial Real Estate News 

City of Saskatoon future growth maps

P4G maps.

.  

“We need nature as much in the city as in the countryside.  In order to endure we must maintain the bounty of the great cornucopia which is our inheritance…It is not a choice of either the city or the countryside: both are essential, but today it is nature, beleaguered in the country, too scarce in the city which has become precious…Our eyes do not divide us from the world but unite us with it….Man is that uniquely conscious creature who can perceive and express.  He must become the steward of the biosphere.  To do this he must design with nature.” Page 5

“The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker

Bibliography:

McHarg, Ian L.  Design with Nature.  25th Anniversary Edition  John Wiley and Sons, Inc.  Toronto, ON, ISBN 0-471-55797-8, ISBN 0-471-11460-X Pbk.  1992

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations. – Richard St. Barbe Baker.

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Rethinking Boundaries

“Rethinking Boundaries.

The issues of who owns what, and off site issues such as noise, have a huge impact on the way a site can work as a landscape.  The way in which a site has been defined should be kept in mind when any project starts…Our work, more often than note, is about how people use spaces, how they live in  places, what they do, how they walk, dance, play, and rest.  Designing for people has the added benefit of empowering a proprietary population, people who will not only care about but care for the landscape.”  Ruddick, Margie.  Wild by Design.  Island Press.  Washington. 2016

Neault Road & the Afforestation Areas: The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans. (source and map page 26-27)  What is a rural commercial/industrial area?

“The Rural Commercial/Industrial category accommodates general commercial and industrial uses, including lightly-serviced industrial, storage, and commercial areas that require a large land base. This area shall be differentiated into Rural Commercial and Rural Industrial areas through future planning” Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan May 2017

 George Genereux Urban Regional Park is quarter section is 160 acres or one forth of a square mile which is a very very small amount of land in comparison to the massive number of sections under review and planning currently.(source and map page 26-27)

The land surrounding George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area) as previously mentioned is rural commercial/industrial area and takes up approximately 11 quarter sections of land (See map)- so how will the land planning affect the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area)? (source and map page 26-27)

How will the city of Saskatoon and greater metropolitan area tackle the particular benefits of the George Genereux urban regional park?  How will the George Genereux Urban Regional Park be preserved in perpetuity, as per the 1972 proclamation by the City of Saskatoon during this next phase of expansion?  As the population of the greater metropolitan area designs ever increasing land masses for commercial, industrial, and residential, where sill the quarter section of land afforested end up?

Did you know that trees, forests, and afforestation areas do help protect you from carcinogens!!!!  So in the middle of a rural commercial/industrial area, the George Genereux Urban Regional Park would mitigate harmful emissions which arise from rural industrial activities.  As rural and urban residents the information from long range planning provides a safer and healthier space for everyone to live and reside.  Building our urban forest is an amazing testament to both the city and the P4G planners.

“Our green space is more than just beautiful – it provides an abundance of ecological services. Purifying the air we breathe and the water in which we swim and drink are but a few examples. The cumulative benefits of these life-sustaining services provided by the urban canopy have been valued at more than $80-million annually. Ecological services such as these help to remediate some of the negative health effects brought on by industrial activities and the resulting pollution.  ”
Prevention as the cure: How trees help protect you from carcinogens

Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authority (SREDA).  The P4G meets in the effort to expand the city of Saskatoon, and surrounding environs to  between 273,000 and 301,000 by 2020; 302,000 and 349,000 by 2025; 333,000 and 405,000 by 2030; and between 368,000 and 470,000 by 2035.  (source) As a matter of fact Saskatoon eyes 1M population in 50 years.

“The prescription for this new global market economy is to rob federal governments of all legitimate roles in setting standards, whether for the health of the people or the environment. Deregulation and decentralization become dominant policy since all regulations are viewed as violations of the freedom of the market. Laws protecting wildlife, natural resources like forests, or for that matter, the quality of air, water and soil, or the integrity of biodiversity, are viewed as unacceptable obstacles in the part of the market’s role in mediating all matters. Still another aspect of the new global order is privatization. The private sector is to be trusted to apply the laws of the marketplace to all matters social and environmental. The test for response to toxins in our environment is to measure the harm of continued use against the alleged greater economic harm of a ban, even if the substance is a carcinogen, the benefits being easier to quantify than the harm, when it involves human pain and suffering. ” Knelman, F.H. , Ph.D.  The Sociology of Health The Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine Vol. 11, 3rd Quarter 1996 

 

 

“The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“what we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another” Mahatma Gandhi.

“George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

Where is the “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park in relation to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area?

Map showing the Afforestation Area Formerly Known As George Genereux Urban Regional Park, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, South West Off Leash Recreation Area, SW OLRA and the Afforestation Area All are within City of Saskatoon boundaries as of an annexation of 2005
adapted from the City of Saskatoon Projected Growth Concept Plan map

On any maps showing the city and RM of Corman Park 344, the small square extending west from SK Highway 7 is “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is south of Chappell Yards CNR train station, and north of Township Road 362 A (Cedar Villa Road)  Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is west of the Civic Operations Center (Bus Barns and Snow Dump facility), and east of the Saskatoon Italian Center and Saskatchewan Highway 7.

“George Genereux” Urban Regional Park is directly diagonal across Saskatchewan Highway 7 east.  “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park is a quarter section of afforested land.  Both “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area were purchased by the City of Saskatoon in 1960 and afforested in a 1972 “War Against Ecology Abuse” programme by the City of Saskatoon Parks Department to be used as a tree nursery.  1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before city council that these first  660 acres of afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity and this is approved.  The trees are much too big to transplant now, in 1979, the naming included Urban Regional Park in the title.

Both Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and  “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park  received their respective names  October 19 1978 (proposal to City Council) – October 30, 1978 (vote by city to approve and finalize). The name “George Genereux” was taken for a pocket park in another area of Saskatoon, leaving this urban regional park without a name.

What land development and growth is proposed for the land around George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

Forest Picture: George Genereux Urban Regional Park looking east from CNR Overpass SK Hwy 7
DSCN7452.JPG

“The clearest way into the universe is through a forest wilderness.”  John Muir

Who was George Genereux?

George Genereux (March 1 1935- April 10, 1989) was a seventeen year old high school student in 1952 when he won the Olympic Games Gold Medal for trap-shooting at the Summer Olympc Games held in Helsinki, Finland with 192 out of 200.  This was Canada’s first gold medal at the olympics since 1932.  Further to this honour, Genereux was bestowed the Lou Marsh Trophy for being Canada’s outstanding amateur athlete of the year, making him the youngest person in history to receive this honour.  The City of Saskatoon declared Genereux “Citizen of the Year” in 1952.  Canada honoured him as male athlete of 1952.  Genereux was installed in the Canada Sports Hall of Fame (1955), Saskatchewan  Sports Hall of Fame on October 31 of 1966, inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame 1986 and the Trapshooting Hall of Fame (1986).(Source, Source, Source, Source, Source and City of Saskatoon archives)

Genereux was born to Dr. Arthur Genereux (b1901 Lethbridge AB – March 12, 1975) and Catherine (d 1964).(Source)  At the age of 16, Genereux was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis, which ended his sporting career in trap shooting when he was 20.(Source and Source)

Genereux started training with his father, Dr. A.F. Genereux, and Jimmy Girgulis when he was 12 years old. James “Jim” Girgulis, himself won the Canadian Team Trap Shooting Campionship in 1939 and 1941.  Further, Girgulis, won every trap shooting event held across Western Canada.   Genereux went on to trap shooting events across  Canada and the United States.  At the age of 13 Genereux won the Midwestern International Handicap Honours, then he acquired 3 successive Manitoba – Saskatchewan junior titles. (source) Genereux won the Junior Championship of North America at the Grand American Handicap, held in Vandalia, Ohio in 1951.  During this event, Genereux broke 199 clay pigeons out of 200.  Genereux also placed second in the Oslo, Norway World Championships, 1952.  (Source, Source,  Source and City of Saskatoon archives)

Genereux, attended the University of Saskatchewan to earn his Arts and Sciences degree, then he went on the McGill University to study Medicine graduated 1960.  Dr. George Genereux was for years a Professor of Radiology at the Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon.

The biography submitted to City Council stated that “It is considered appropriate to select in his honour this particular tract of semi-wilderness with its favorable habitat for wildlife of many kinds.”

Genereux is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery along with his mother and father.  Genereux died April 10, 1989.

“At the time of his death he was working with three other internationally known  specialists on the third and fourth volumes of a study of chest diseases. ..Despite his own bad health, Genereux worked to advance the cause of medical knowledge.   If you can’t help yourself, you should use your God-given talents to help others,’ he said in one interview.” Saskatoon Star Phoenix April 11, 1989

The above map shows the relation of the afforestation areas to the West Swale, and its confluence at Yorath Island.  The West Swale, and the deposition of Yorath Island were created from the Pleistocene era “Yorath Island Spillway” event.

What land development and growth is proposed for the land around George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

“Trees exhale for us so that we can inhale them to stay alive. Can we ever forget that? Let us love trees with every breath we take until we perish.” 
― Munia Khan 

When walking in either “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park or the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area they can be seen one from the other by peering under the CNR overpass.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Bibliography:

Sharpshooter George3 Genereux grabs gold – Helsink, 1952 CBC Digital Archives.

George Genereux Canadian Encyclopedia

George Genereux Sports Hall of Fame.

George Genereux Sports Reference Olympic Sports

George Genereux Saskatoon Public Library

James Jim Girgulis Sask Sports Hall of Fame

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉.

 

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Neault Road & the Afforestation Areas

The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans. (source and map page 26-27)

A Stantec report showed potential heritage concerns south of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area and north of Hodgson Road. Currently the West Connector Route for the proposed provincial Saskatoon Freeway shows Hodgson road as the main access onto Valley Road and into the city of Saskatoon.

The Blairmore Sector Housing Development is shown on the map entitled West Connector Route Feasibility Study Figure 2.4 Existing and Future Land Uses

So the new name for Saskatchewan Highway 7 travelling northwards within city limits is Neault Road. Neault Road naming  is the north south route beginning just south of Hart Road, and north of the CNR railway overpass where Sk Highway 7 takes a corner (from travelling diagonally south west across the province to a turn where it extends due north).  Sk Highway 7 is a major  road which connects the City of Saskatoon with Vanscoy, Laura, Delisle, Zealandia, Rosetown, Fiske, Netherhill, Kindersley, and Alsask when you drive south west  out of the City.  Sk Highway 7 also is the highway to gain access to Provincial Highway 60 to Pike Lake Provincial Park.  (Map) (Sk Hwy 7 Route)

Travelling north  on Neault Road in Saskatoon does connect rurally with the Dalmeny Access road (highway 684). (map)

The proposed Saskatoon Freeway North route will run north and south alongside but west of  Neault Road, in such a way connecting Sk Highway 14 (22nd Street West) to the proposed new Saskatoon Freeway (north end of Saskatoon).  This proposed Saskatoon Freeway (bridge) will be north of 71 Street (Auction Mart Road)  about one mile north of the newly opened Chief Mistawisis Bridge (Marquis Drive and the North Commuter Parkway).(map)

This new Saskatoon Freeway route is a provincial initiative, and is a topic of the P4G meetings. (Draft Regional Plan)

Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authority (SREDA).  The P4G meets in the effort to expand the city of Saskatoon, and surrounding environs to  between 273,000 and 301,000 by 2020; 302,000 and 349,000 by 2025; 333,000 and 405,000 by 2030; and between 368,000 and 470,000 by 2035.  (source) As a matter of fact Saskatoon eyes 1M population in 50 years.

The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans.  George Genereux Urban Regional Park land area was annexed from the RM of Corman Park 344 on September 1, 2015, and the north, south and west borders of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park are also concurrent with the City limits boundary.   The eastern boundary of George Genereux Urban Regional Park is SK Hwy 7 at the CNR overpass.  This being said both Saskatoon, and the RM of Corman Park are involved in the P4G progress.(source and map page 26-27)

A Stantec report showed potential heritage concerns south of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area and north of Hodgson Road.  The southern border of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area is also the southern city limits boundary, across Cedar Villa Road (Township Road 362A) is Cedar Villa Estates and Chappell Marsh Conservation Area in the RM of Corman Park 344. Currently the West Connector Route for the proposed provincial Saskatoon Freeway shows Hodgson road as the main access onto Valley Road and into the city of Saskatoon.  As Saskatoon and the P4G area grows in population density, employment sectors are needed as well as housing.

The proposed Blairmore Sector Housing Development is shown on the map entitled West Connector Route Feasibility Study Figure 2.4 Existing and Future Land Uses

An employment sector includes a development of shopping malls, offices, and industrial areas for the economic trade of goods and services, to provide jobs for the projected, 300,000; 400,000 and 500,000 population density.   The City of Saskatoon has a Strategic plan 2013-2023 which encompasses seven strategic goals.(Plan) (pdf details of plan)

The Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan and further information for areas mainly north and north west of Saskatoon are online.  The Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth and Regional Planning is taking into consideration Natural and Heritage Resources The guiding principals of the P4G will take into account the guiding principles of Partnership, Efficiency, Sustainability, Opportunity, Equity + Inclusiveness, Flexiblity + Resilience and will follow 7 strategic directions; Regional infrastructure + services, Settlement patterns + complete communities, Regional economy + economic development, Quality of life, Governance + funding, Natural environment + drainage, along with Agriculture + Natural resources.

[P4G] “Regional Wetlands Inventory and Policy

Although the Green Network Refinement Study is intended to provide a comprehensive assessment of the Green Network to inform the future management of these areas for conservation and drainage functions, there is a lack of compiled information about the type, location, and importance of wetlands across the Region. Providing an inventory for the Region will support efforts by municipalities and P4G to conserve and protect important wetlands in the short-term.

In the longer term, a Regional Wetlands Policy may be developed to support wetlands protection, conservation, and enhancement across the Region. This Policy would complement the policies for the Green Network Study Area, and detail provisions for managing wetlands across the Region; coordinating conservation, mitigation, and enhancement projects; and linking wetlands protection with flood management and control.”(source)

The George Genereux Urban Regional Park, and Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Areas are both classified as wetlands according to Stantec, and provide for planning purposes, the mitigation of flood waters.  The West Swale is a low lying geological feature created from the Pleistocene Yorath Island Spillway.   The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located within the west swale, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, is located between the west swale and the CNR railway tracks.  1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before council that these first  660 acres of afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity, this is approved.

Have you attended any Partnership for Growth meetings? P4G includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman.  Find out how you can contribute to the plan.

“what we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another” Mahatma Gandhi.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

Is there anything I can do?

 

“What you permit, you promote.
What you allow, you encourage.
What you condone, you own.”

~Michelle Malkin.

 

 

  WordPress has a daily prompt proferring words upon which a story or report may unfold. The Daily prompt for the day this story was written happened to be “permit” which is the segway into the afforestation area, and what is permitted.

Thank you kindly for your visit.  This post has been revised.  Recently a comment came forward “If there is anything I can do, please let me know.

What is it that others can do?  Take action in order that the afforestation areas a/ become a part of municipal reserve and b/ become a part of park space.

This  concept is the first step of progress for the afforestation areas.  The long range planners are formally cognizant of the larger picture, the view that not even any single stakeholder is aware of.  The long range planners can do wonders in their planning, if everything falls into place.  However a puzzle cannot be completed with puzzle pieces missing.

Is there anything I can do?
Is there anything I can do?

That which is missing is the wherewithal that the long range planners require in order to their job with knowledge and good judgement.  Wherewithal; means or supplies for the purpose or need, especially money.

How do the City of Saskatoon long range planners identify social, economic and environmental goals?
The City of Saskatoon sees a projected population of about 344,000 by 2035, and between 406,000 to 496,000 for the Saskatoon census management area. Of this identified growth, the demographics and population statistics are also factored in for the next 20 years. There is understanding about the population diversity youth, young adults, middle-aged, and elderly residents. Growing forward identifies the complexity of issues between diverse interests, and are excited to discuss community expectations, and priorities. {Source}

“Growing in a smart and sustainable way starts with putting people at the centre of planning,” says Randy Grauer, the City’s General Manager of Community Services. “Growth isn’t just about expanding our footprint, it’s about expanding economic, social, cultural and educational opportunities for everyone… when quality of life leads planning, cities become great places to live.”

Long range planners work directly with the community in conjunction with City of Saskatoon staff and City council. Planners are up to date on new developments in other cities, seek guidance from the City of Saskatoon Strategic Action Plan, and are conversant with the bylaws, environmental regulations, and zoning related ordinances. Community values guide the long range planners as they employ a diverse range of professional services hiring consultants where necessary, and seeking advice from City departments such as the urban forestry program, emergency services, finance, recreation and culture, community support, environmental health, public works, infrastructure and transportation for example. Alongside this, long range planners work in partnership with developers, government partners, political representatives, contractors, city council, legal counsel as well community partners for business and neighbourhood development.

How can long range planners negotiate all these various inputs, resolve conflicts, develop and lead successful collaborative processes and procedures? It is indeed complicated, but with knowledge, wisdom, and foresight, long range planners have served the city of Saskatoon well with analysis of inputs, and support in the preparation of studies, plans, and reports. Long range planners implement all these exciting, and emerging viewpoints in a broad framework encompassing the larger picture and bear in mind how the delivery of such a plan will be of a benefit to all as Saskatoon grows, evolves and changes. With teamwork, leadership, and great community stakeholder collaboration the long range planners improve the quality of life for Saskatoon residents.

It’s an amazing and complicated position which champions for the city of Saskatoon;
Continuous Improvement
Asset and Financial Sustainability
Quality of Life
Environmental Leadership
Sustainable Growth
Moving Around
Economic Diversity and Prosperity

Responding to the comment again; “If there is anything I can do, please let me know.”  What is it that others can do?

Assist in the process which enables the

  1. afforestation areas to  become a part of municipal reserve
  2. afforestation areas to become a part of city park space.

It is only with this visualization that the needs of a variety of stakeholders will be met, illegal trespass are mitigated and the long range planners can do their job, and create a city of Saskatoon which is truly amazing.  It is only when the afforestation areas become municipal reserve and a part of city park space that the long range planners have the wherewithal; means or supplies for the purpose or need, especially money to embrace the afforestation areas.

Contact the city of Saskatoon to promote this process;

municipal reserve and park space for the afforestation areas.

“When you grow up you tend to get told that the world is the way it is and your life is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family life, have fun, save a little money. That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it… Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.” Steve Jobs

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side, and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy from my having lived in it. Richard St. Barbe Baker

Walk the Walk

Two issues have recently resurfaced.

    1. Today, January 25 2018, is female blackout from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. It’s a movement to show what the world might be like without women. Your facebook photo should just be a black square so that men wonder where the women are. Pass it only to women. It’s for a project against domestic abuse, It’s no joke. Share it on your facebook page.
    2. A reminder came forward that the Jane’s Walk believes in walkable cities in honour of journalist Jane Jacobs OC OOnt (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006).  Jane’s Walks are one way to get people out into nature, into their cities, and in touch with the people of their community.  And as the Saskatoon Jane’s Walk representative states; Jane’s Walks “support ensuring [that] the Afforestation area remains a walkable safe location for all to enjoy”

Have you walked the afforestation areas?  Have you really walked these urban regional park to be able to discover and respond to the complexities which exist through observation?  Here is a photo album of images photographed since the community volunteer clean ups.   [October 2016 1,500 kilograms (3,300 pounds) ~ July 2016 8,300 kg (18,300 pounds or 9 tons) ~  June 2015 3,300 kilograms (7,275 Pounds) of trash, chesterfields, construction materials with nails, shingles, and tires were removed.] And this is a map [west portion of afforestation area only] exploring the complexities which have been observed since the cleanups.  Who has walked George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

How can the Afforestation areas be a “walkable safe location for all to enjoy”?  And today, January 25, 2018 ~ female black out day, would women feel comfortable walking in the city, in all urban regional parks, and in the afforestation areas?

Walk the walk
AND
Talk the talk

Today, female blackour from 8L00 a.m. to 9/l00 p.m. It's a movement to show what the world might be like without women. Your facebook photo should just be a black square so that men wonder where the women are. Pass it only to women. It's for a project against domestic abuse, It's no joke. Share it.
Female Black Out Day: what the world might be like without women

Very wonderfully, full city addresses have been enabled for all city parks, and for the afforestation areas.  An address very wonderfully aids in the safety process in cities, as addresses enable a call for help to friends or family and to emergency support.

Fires have sprung up in the afforestation area such as in the spring of 2016. Besides fires in the Afforestation areas, in both 2011 and 2016 huge grass fires broke out near the afforestation areas.  The afforestation area is adjacent to the Canadian National Railway ‘CN Chappell Yards.’  A railway yard, is a complex series of railroad tracks for storing, sorting, or loading/unloading, railroad cars and/or locomotives which may carry flammable contents.  The afforestation area is within the City of Saskatoon city limits, adjacent to the neighbourhoods such as Montgomery Place, and also adjacent to the homes of Cedar Villa Estates of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344. Thankfully there are no more tires in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area which may fuel such fires should they become out of control. And of course, the afforestation areas are home to diverse biodiversity, woodlands, wetlands and grassland flora and fauna as well as host to many and several visitors from the city exploring nature on bicycle, walking, or with their dogs.  The visitors include men, women and children.

“Some believe it is only great power that can hold evil in check, but that is not what I have found. It is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay. Small acts of kindness and love.”  J.R.R. Tolkein Gandalf character

“A city street equipped to handle strangers, and to make a safety asset, in itself, our of the presence of strangers, as the streets of successful city neighborhoods always do, must have three main qualities:

First, there must be a clear demarcation between what is public space and what is private space. Public and private spaces cannot ooze into each other as they do typically in suburban settings or in projects.

Second, there must be eyes upon the street, eyes belonging to those we might call the natural proprietors of the street. The buildings on a street equipped to handle strangers and to insure the safety of both residents and strangers, must be oriented to the street. They cannot turn their backs or blank sides on it and leave it blind.

And third, the sidewalk must have users on it fairly continuously, both to add to the number of effective eyes on the street and to induce the people in buildings along the street to watch the sidewalks in sufficient numbers. Nobody enjoys sitting on a stoop or looking out a window at an empty street. Almost nobody does such a thing. Large numbers of people entertain themselves, off and on, by watching street activity.”
― Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities

At the afforestation areas there are no real demarcations of space, except at the South West off leash recreation area and the east side.  What happened in this areas? What was the result?  Illegal trespass has declined to nil.  Illegal activity [i.e. trash in the park] has declined to nil. Woo Hoo!!!!!!! These portions of the afforestation areas are most definitely showing the progress in tune with the philosophy of Jane Jacobs ~ activist best known for her influence on urban studies [city planning] which introduced sociological concepts such as “eyes on the street”.  Nature enthusiasts, dog walkers, bicyclists, photographers are coming out to these areas …. and …. really enjoying it.  There is safety!  This is wonderful progress!

“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”― Jane Jacobs

The question is asked again, would you, lady, gentleman or child, feel safe today, January 25, 2018 ~  female black out day ~ or any day in the City of Saskatoon, in its urban regional parks, and in the Afforestation Areas? It is hoped that the answer to this question is a resounding “yes!”, if not why not?

Observe, Experience, Do Something.

In honour of female blackout day ~  a movement to show what the world might be like without women ~ perhaps a statue should be erected in the City of Saskatoon afforestation areas.

Why?

“I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy from my having lived in it. “Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“The robin flew from his swinging spray of ivy on to the top of the wall and he opened his beak and sang a loud, lovely trill, merely to show off. Nothing in the world is quite as adorably lovely as a robin…” Frances Hodgson Burnett The Secret Garden

How? Recreation in harmony with wildlife.

Is it possible and How?

“Every trail can’t be all things to all people but all trails can play beneficial roles. Trails play roles in the economy, play roles in the environment and perhaps most importantly, play roles in our health.*” Trails have the capacity to provide connectivity, economic benefits, education potential, environmental interpretation, health, heritage, and recreation. Trails can also focus on just interpretive trails. Trails may be made solely for recreation without awareness of the environment. Those people focusing on the lack of Vitamin “N” in the urban population, may construct trails for education and health, and not focus on a wide variety of recreation. Then there are those trails which with planning and foresight have the capacity to combine many features for an audience of skiiers, classrooms of snowshoers, groups of fat bicycle riders, and nature enthusiasts who come to the forest to band birds. Trails invite people and increase the human footprint. Is it at all possible for trails to provide health benefits of recreation and to conserve the footprint of birds and wildlife at the same time?

Trails can be constructed to encircle biospheres, and trails can loop around and create length for an exercise workout. Ecosystems in the afforestation area vary widely. Prairie gives way to permanent class IV wetlands, in turn cycles to Aspen Parkland bluffs, which at the next turn reveals implanted and afforested trees. Native grasslands mix with modified grasslands. Native trees combine with afforested mature tree plantings. Shallow temporary floodplains flow with intermittent streams between marsh areas.

Abandoned roadways in the afforestation area formerly allowed motorized vehicle travel east and west. Newly created trails create greenways through the forest biome itself.

“‘Planning Trails with Wildlife in Mind’ helps trail planners and builders balance the benefits of creating trails with being stewards of nature and wildlife habitat.” How does one make a bicycle path appropriate for a semi-wilderness wildlife habitat? What are some guidelines for being aware of wildlife, aquatic areas, and environmental impacts and consequences? Can trails be designed in the winter months without an awareness of the spring, summer and fall biosphere? How can trails enrich greenways, and the wildlife, while still providing a recreational experience? Are there impacts of trails on the nesting site of deer families, and fawns? What is the view from the bird’s nest with an increase of trail users in a forest?

Is it possible that a greenway concept or trail design, that the flora and fauna of wetlands and woodlands can thrive alongside people in nature? What types of design considerations and awareness of the biodiversity are required? Trail and corridor planning has the capacity to provide ecologically sustainable trails for a city urban footprint. Trails can protect environmental resources, if the natural eco-system is e

valuated, and considered.

However, that being said, trails can focus only on recreational aspects, and those benefits. Trails can be indeed fantastic ways to enjoy winter recreation. Once built, the same trails over the spring, summer and fall months, have opened up the wildlife habitat to people. There is no doubt about it, the winter recreation trails don’t disappear along with the snow melt.

Do these trails bring people into the environment with minimal environmental impact? What happens on a winter trail in the summer?  Do the trails provide the tourist with the capacity for educational, scenic or interpretive opportunity year round? Can all vegetation be linked with a greenway corridor, or are there species which do not thrive around a trail? Similarly what species of animals will make homes, reproduce, and live in the same habitat as trails? Can this be accomplished, or does it become an either or? Is it a choice to choose between trails and a variety of fauna, or can they exist together? Do trails include the biosphere of flora and fauna species and therefore enhance the environment?

How do challenging bicycling and hiking trails compare to a shorter interpretive or nature trail? Is the area only large enough for recreational trails, and the park should only be open in the winter, and close up for the other seasons? Can recreational winter trails, afford environmentally friendly trails during other seasons?

Trails dig deep into a woodland, when a trail transects through a forest what are the impacts on the woodland animals, and birds? Do botanists work alongside trail planners to know which areas are sensitive and which would thrive with trails?

Trails are amazing things, a well-designed trail has minimal devastation to the vegetation, are easy to hike, bicycle, ski and snowshoe.  However it may possibly be that protecting the vegetation, is not the sole responsibility when trail planning when providing a minimum impact onto an eco-system. Again, trails are truly amazing things, providing people with an opportunity to bicycle in nature, hike, showshoe, ski, or band birds. Alongside the vegetation, good trail planning will consider the seasons and the urban footprint all year round. If a winter ski trail is created in one area of a biome, will this impact where a deer gives birth to a fawn in the spring? When a winter trail loops through a forest, will that have a ripple effect on species of birds nesting over the summer?

Eco-tourism is wonderful. A healthy and active outdoor lifestyle is absolutely marvelous. Having the capacity to celebrate a semi-wilderness habitat in the city is remarkable. What is the way to make these concepts mutally inclusive? How can winter trail networks live in harmony with semi-wilderness wildlife habitats? This question begs the need to know what wildlife habitats exist, which species live where. Where do the nature enthusiasts band their birds? Where do the deers nest their fawns? If these questions are answered, the biosphere, is truly enhanced with trails, and the next generation of skiiers, snowshoers, hikers, and bicyclers will also be handed a glimpse of a deer, and the grandchildren of the bird-banders, will also be able to band birds alongside the same trails.  Wouldn’t that be fantastic if many generations of recreational enthusiasts, could have a grand time celebrating winter, and that their great grandchildren may also see a deer in a city forest?  Is it possible and how can it be accomplished? The question now is how?

BIBLIOGRAPHY
* Benefits of Trails Hike Ontario.

Trails, Bike and Hike: Inpsiring a Healthy Environment Upper Thams River Conservation Authority. Parks Recreation and Natural Areas.

National Trails Training Partnership Wildlife and environment impacts and benefits of Trails and Greenways.

Benefits of Trails | Rails to Trails

Enhancing the Environment with Trails and Greenways. Rails to Trails Conservancy.

Trails in Saskatchewan Provincial Parks

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***