Biodiversity and the last species

“…there is nothing more sacred than the pact between humans and the land that gives them their food.  Janine Benyus.” (Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti)

“journeys of … eco-municipalities towards sustainability also teach that there are no package solutions toward this goal.  Each community and each actor within that community must find the particular path that fits that local terrain and situation.”Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

“[We] do not really know what we are losing when we lose species.  Some ecologists have likened the loss of biodiversity to an airplane flight during which we continually pull out rivets as the plane cruises along.  How many rivets can we pull out before disaster occurs?” Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

One of the signposts along the path include a guiding local vision.  Saskatoon has undertaken its vision or journey of growth to half a million people with the YXEGreenStrategy,  and Saskatoon’s Strategic Growth Plan which includes seven strategic goals.

“Eco-municipalities have educated thousands of their employees about unsustainable environmental and social trends and the reasons why new local practices are essential for helping to change these trends.  These municipalities have engaged community citizens – sometimes, entire villages – in planning and revitalization initiatives toward sustainability.  These community initiatives have found locally suited ways to reduce use of fossil fuels, metals and minerals, chemicals, encroachment upon nature, and to meet human and community needs fairly and efficiently.”Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

“What you people call your natural resources, our people call our relatives” ~ Orien Lyons, faith keeper of the Onondaga.

“Many of us are aware that having open space, woodlands, babbling brooks, and singing birds nearby contributes to our quality of life.  What we often forget, though, is that these aspects of nature are also our life-support system.  Without enough oxygen to breathe, without enough green plants to support our food system, without enough potable water, there would be no us.” Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

“The great biologist E.O. Wilson has said…”the question I am asked most frequently about the diversity of life [is]: if enough species are extinguished, will the ecosystems collapse, and will the extinction of most other species follow soon afterward?  The only answer anyone can give is, possibly.  By the time we find out, however, it might be too late.  One planet, one experiment.”  Sarah James and Torbjörn Lahti

Please read the following long range planning reports and how they relate to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park.

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and those land areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation areas and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Bibliography.

James, Sarah and Torbjörn Lahti.  The Natural Step for Communities. How Cities and Towns can change to sustainable practices.  ISBN 0-86571-491-6.  New Society Publishers.  Gabriola Island, B.C. 2004.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

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Everything you do counts

 

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

Richard St. Barbe Baker…was another who never lost that childlike faith that each of us can have a tremendous impact on the world. A near-mythical character who came to be called “The Man of the Trees,” St. Barbe started planting trees when he was three years old and didn’t stop until he had planted, or inspired others to plant, 25 billion trees all over the planet. Who could ever imagine that one man could accomplish so much in one lifetime, and inspire so many others to carry on the work?”~P.T. New Age Volume 8 number 4 November 1982

Paul Hanley, a knew personally St. Barbe.  Hanley is a freelance writer, and environmentalist who has written a biography on this internationally known forester, Richard St. Barbe Baker.  Contact Paul Hanley for more information about this book, Man of the Trees. Richard St. Barbe Baker, the First Global Conservationist Foreword by HRH The Prince of Wales Introduction by Jane Goodall.

Richard St. Barbe Baker ~ Inductee into the Environmental Hall of Fame in 1983 (The Mother Earth News. January/February 1984).  Richard St. Barbe Baker, awarded honorary LL.D. at the University of Saskatchewan in 1971.  Order of the British Empire bestowed upon St. Barbe in 1978.

“Just imagine for a moment what it would be like if you really knew that everything you do counts – which, ironically, on a cosmic level, is probably true. If you knew that to be a fact, in a very concrete, immediate way, would you live your life differently? Just today, for example, how might you have related to your children and loved ones if you knew that everything you say and do does affect them deeply and indelibly? How might you change at work? Would you even continue to do the work you do? And what about your community? How often have you hung back from raising issues with your neighbors, your community government, your school, whatever, because everyone knows “You can’t fight City Hall”? And then what about the national and international level? Are you at all active on that scale? How could you possibly have an impact?…But what we can see, incontrovertibly, is that those who choose to believe that what they do does make a difference have a special quality to their lives.~P.T. New Age Volume 8 number 4 November 1982

Paul Hanley also wrote the best selling book Eleven speaking of the time when the planet reaches Eleven billion people ~ echoing the following sentiments of Richard St. Barbe Baker.  What are the choices facing this  generation for the future survival of our planet?  [As of  October 2018 , the world population was 7.7 billion.]

“Under existing systems food looms large and there is a constant threat of famine over wide areas, but if we treat reforestation as seriously as we do national defense, and turn from an animal economy to a sylvan one, we shall be able to look forward confidently to the time when food will worry us as little as the air we breath. Indeed, when we have every man under his own vine and fig tree in a perfect earth, beautified by complete landscape husbandry, then with St. Francis of Assissi, we shall be able to say: ‘Praise be, my Lord, for our Sister, Mother Earth, which does sustain and keep us and bringeth forth diverse fruits and flowers of many colors and grass.~ Richard St. Barbe Baker The Mother Earth News. January/February 1984”

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5  To support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy form my having lived in it. “Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

You have made a difference!

September 21  World Gratitude Day

Green Certificate - World Gratitude Day - September 21
Green Certificate – World Gratitude Day – September 21

How can you be thankful to your community?  Have you gone out of your way to profess a heartfelt thank you to someone who has made a difference in your community?  What of the countless people who make the city safe, and beautiful?  Have you extended a word of thanks to those who keep your parks area verdant and the heart of your community.  The Urban Forestry Program, takes care of those trees which remove pollutants from our air, creating a wondrous city free of smog.

What is it that makes a good city excellent?  Shops, entertainment, shelter are among some readily picked choices.

However, is not the public park, the place where childhood memories made?  Just as a healthy frog serves as an indicator of a thriving environment, does not a good park serve as measure of a world class city?

What is the difference between a park and a parking lot?  Well most people agree, that a good and blissful public park has lots of trees, wetlands, and fresh fragrant woodland and meadow air.  A great park has safety, and provides a sanctuary to interact within the neighbourhood, and meet new people  A perfect setting for a picnic, events, recreation, and general happiness and relaxation to everyone in the neighbourhood.  A wide variety of cultural events embrace musicians, yoga groups, bicycle trips, bird watchers, the young and the old.

Perhaps you bring your kids to run and play!  Or maybe your dogs need to sniff and get some mental exercise.  Your camera might need to be taken out of the box and out for a leisurely walk. Perhaps your son or daughter has ADHD or is autistic, and what better sense of achievement that a stroll or bicycle ride down a forest path for physical health and mental healing?  A teacher may use the path to teach their students about the environment.  The public park is a place for fellowship, health and wellbeing for one and all where can everyone  find a safe place in nature as Saskatoon grows to a booming population of one million!

However it works for you, be thankful for your park.  Its not every city that has a healthy ecosystem embracing grasslands, woodlands and wetlands.

Richard St. Barbe Baker spoke to his gratefulness, in his book My Life My Trees

“I wandered on as in a dream, all sense of time and space lost …

“I became intoxicated with the beauty all around me, immersed in the joyousness and exultation of feeling part of it all.

“I had entered the temple of the wood. I sank to the ground in a state of ecstasy; everything was intensely vivid – the call of a distant cuckoo seemed just for me …

“The overpowering beauty of it all entered my very being.

“At that moment my heart brimmed over with a sense of unspeakable thankfulness which has followed me through the years since that woodland re-birth …

“I was in love with life: I was indeed born again, although I could not have explained what had happened to me then.”

Happy World Gratitude Day!

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5  To support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donationis greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

Chaque fois que je fais les courses, je vote résolument “Oui aux aliments en vrac!” et “Oui aux produits biologiques!” Pour mes enfants, je rêve d’un avenir plus sain et sans déchet: je suis heureuse d’y investir mon argent chaque semaine.”
― Bea Johnson

 

“Has any one of us ever really seen a Tree? When we become aware of trees we may catch glimpses of them in moments of spiritual vision and, identifying ourselves with the trees, become conscious of the rising of the sap; the upward thrust of life; leaf burgeoning, their consciousness of the changing seasons; we may share their passionately boisterous exuberance of life in the height of a storm, and their tranquility when at rest; with them we will enjoy the glad murmur of the ripening seed clusters when after weeks of drought the steady warm rain brings relief to thirst; and we will know that these creatures, our elder brethern, are intimately related to us in their love and hunger for life. We may even catch their enthusiasm and aspire heavenwards while still rooted in our Mother Earth and in communion with our fellow men and, tree-wise, strive to make the Earth more fruitful again.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Saskatoon Green Infrastructure Program

You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover.
Richard St. Barbe Baker

Green Infrastructure “is a network providing the “ingredients” for solving urban and climatic challenges by building with nature”. The main components of this approach include stormwater management, climate adaptation, less heat stress, more biodiversity, food production, better air quality, sustainable energy production, clean water and healthy soils, as well as the more anthropocentric functions such as increased quality of life through recreation and providing shade and shelter in and around towns and cities.”[*]

“The fate of an individual or a nation will always be determined by the degree of his or its harmony with the forces and laws of Nature and the universe.  Man is not alone in the universe but is surrounded by sources of power, harmony and knowledge.  The fullness of life depends upon man’s harmony with the totality of the natural cosmic laws.  Our individual evolution is a job that has to be carried on day by day by each individual himself.  It is a livelong task.”Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Green infrastructure refers to any natural or built systems that provide ecological benefits and help to maintain pre-development hydrology. It encompasses natural features like streams, wetlands, forests, and parks, as well as engineered systems that manage urban runoff.”[***]

The West Swale is an important pre-requIsite for the City of Saskatoon, as this low lying area protects both agricultural and urban neighbourhoods from flooding. The afforestation area also sequesters carbon emissions, improving the air. The soil and water quality also benefits from the woodland environment.

Environmental benefits include ”

  • Increase carbon sequestration
  • improve air quality
  • additional recreational space
  • efficient land use
  • flood protection
  • drinking water source protection
  • replenish groundwater
  • improve watershed health
  • protect or restore wildlife habitat
  • reduce sewer overflow events
  • restore impaired waters
  • meet regulatory requirements for receiving waters”[**]

By utilizing green infrastructure, the city of Saskatoon has an ecological base for sound social, economic, and environmental health and well-being. In the case of the West Swale and the afforestation areas, the green infrastructure, is supported by wetlands, so it may be also referred to as blue or “blue-green” infrastructure.

Economic benefits include; ”

  • reduce hard infrastructure construction costs
  • maintain aging infrastructure
  • increase land values
  • encourage economic development
  • reduce energy consumption and costs
  • increase life cycle cost savings”[**]

The afforestation area is a splendid example of urban forestry at its finest, and has the capacity to reduce energy usage costs, and may help to manage storm water and runoff. Physical activity and the reduction of stress are among the health benefits of urban green space.

Social benefits are: ”

  • “Establish urban greenways
  • provide pedestrian and bicycle access [recreation]
  • create attractive streetscapes and rooftops that enhance livability and urban green space
  • educate the public about their role in stormwater management
  • urban heat island mitigation”[**]

The meeting on May 29, 2017 showed a forward thinking City of Saskatoon embracing concepts of green infrastructure which will be applied to the long range planning of the Blairmore Sector Plan. Such a proposal brings the green infrastructure home for the neighbourhood planning of the city. According to the report, “the purpose of the Green Infrastructure is to develop an integrated approach to planning for and maintaining a sustainable, biodiverse city by considering natural and supportive areas as part of an ecological system.” As the Blairmore Sector Plan moves forward, natural and naturalized areas will be duly inventoried. As the plan develops, the community will be engaged for public engagement.

With a green infrastructure program, communities unite in an effort to preserve watersheds, wildlife habitats, and parks, to better protect the environment maintaining wildlife diversity while benefiting quality of life, helping people to connect with nature, increase health benefits of spending time in nature, while having access to clean air, and water. Once fully developed, the green infrastructure program have the potential for supporting both recreational and conservation activities that will have positive impacts far beyond the immediate community.

“For in the true nature of things, if we rightly consider, every green tree is far more glorious than if it were made of gold and silver”. ~Martin Luther

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

FCM – Green Municipal Fund What we fund

** Green Infrastructure Case Studies Municipal Policies for Managing Stormwater and Green Infrastructure (EPA 841 F 10 004)

Green Infrastructure | Help Build Sustainable Communities ESRI

Infrastructure Canada – Green Infrastructure. Government of Canada Investing in Green Infrastructure.

Green Infrastructure Webcase Series. United STates Environmental Protection Agency.

Green Infrastructure Partnership Launches ‘Celebrating Green Infrastructure Program’ Waterbucket.ca [For further information on Green Infrastructure and success stories in British Columbia – Guidance Documents and Resources The partnership for Water Sustainability in BC video]
* Green Infrastructure Wikipedia.

Inquiry
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

*** Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program. Urban Runoff and Green Infrastructure. Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program 2016.

What is Green Infrastructure? United States Environmental Protection Agency.

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature.  Its presence is essential to earth as an organism.  It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Stand firm. Grip hard.
Thrust upward to the skies.
Bend to the winds of heaven.
And learn tranquility.
~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“. “I don’t have a bucket list but my bike-it list is a mile long.” – unknown” For the recreation buff

How? Recreation in harmony with wildlife.

Is it possible and How?

“Every trail can’t be all things to all people but all trails can play beneficial roles. Trails play roles in the economy, play roles in the environment and perhaps most importantly, play roles in our health.*” Trails have the capacity to provide connectivity, economic benefits, education potential, environmental interpretation, health, heritage, and recreation. Trails can also focus on just interpretive trails. Trails may be made solely for recreation without awareness of the environment. Those people focusing on the lack of Vitamin “N” in the urban population, may construct trails for education and health, and not focus on a wide variety of recreation. Then there are those trails which with planning and foresight have the capacity to combine many features for an audience of skiiers, classrooms of snowshoers, groups of fat bicycle riders, and nature enthusiasts who come to the forest to band birds. Trails invite people and increase the human footprint. Is it at all possible for trails to provide health benefits of recreation and to conserve the footprint of birds and wildlife at the same time?

Trails can be constructed to encircle biospheres, and trails can loop around and create length for an exercise workout. Ecosystems in the afforestation area vary widely. Prairie gives way to permanent class IV wetlands, in turn cycles to Aspen Parkland bluffs, which at the next turn reveals implanted and afforested trees. Native grasslands mix with modified grasslands. Native trees combine with afforested mature tree plantings. Shallow temporary floodplains flow with intermittent streams between marsh areas.

Abandoned roadways in the afforestation area formerly allowed motorized vehicle travel east and west. Newly created trails create greenways through the forest biome itself.

“‘Planning Trails with Wildlife in Mind’ helps trail planners and builders balance the benefits of creating trails with being stewards of nature and wildlife habitat.” How does one make a bicycle path appropriate for a semi-wilderness wildlife habitat? What are some guidelines for being aware of wildlife, aquatic areas, and environmental impacts and consequences? Can trails be designed in the winter months without an awareness of the spring, summer and fall biosphere? How can trails enrich greenways, and the wildlife, while still providing a recreational experience? Are there impacts of trails on the nesting site of deer families, and fawns? What is the view from the bird’s nest with an increase of trail users in a forest?

Is it possible that a greenway concept or trail design, that the flora and fauna of wetlands and woodlands can thrive alongside people in nature? What types of design considerations and awareness of the biodiversity are required? Trail and corridor planning has the capacity to provide ecologically sustainable trails for a city urban footprint. Trails can protect environmental resources, if the natural eco-system is e

valuated, and considered.

However, that being said, trails can focus only on recreational aspects, and those benefits. Trails can be indeed fantastic ways to enjoy winter recreation. Once built, the same trails over the spring, summer and fall months, have opened up the wildlife habitat to people. There is no doubt about it, the winter recreation trails don’t disappear along with the snow melt.

Do these trails bring people into the environment with minimal environmental impact? What happens on a winter trail in the summer?  Do the trails provide the tourist with the capacity for educational, scenic or interpretive opportunity year round? Can all vegetation be linked with a greenway corridor, or are there species which do not thrive around a trail? Similarly what species of animals will make homes, reproduce, and live in the same habitat as trails? Can this be accomplished, or does it become an either or? Is it a choice to choose between trails and a variety of fauna, or can they exist together? Do trails include the biosphere of flora and fauna species and therefore enhance the environment?

How do challenging bicycling and hiking trails compare to a shorter interpretive or nature trail? Is the area only large enough for recreational trails, and the park should only be open in the winter, and close up for the other seasons? Can recreational winter trails, afford environmentally friendly trails during other seasons?

Trails dig deep into a woodland, when a trail transects through a forest what are the impacts on the woodland animals, and birds? Do botanists work alongside trail planners to know which areas are sensitive and which would thrive with trails?

Trails are amazing things, a well-designed trail has minimal devastation to the vegetation, are easy to hike, bicycle, ski and snowshoe.  However it may possibly be that protecting the vegetation, is not the sole responsibility when trail planning when providing a minimum impact onto an eco-system. Again, trails are truly amazing things, providing people with an opportunity to bicycle in nature, hike, showshoe, ski, or band birds. Alongside the vegetation, good trail planning will consider the seasons and the urban footprint all year round. If a winter ski trail is created in one area of a biome, will this impact where a deer gives birth to a fawn in the spring? When a winter trail loops through a forest, will that have a ripple effect on species of birds nesting over the summer?

Eco-tourism is wonderful. A healthy and active outdoor lifestyle is absolutely marvelous. Having the capacity to celebrate a semi-wilderness habitat in the city is remarkable. What is the way to make these concepts mutally inclusive? How can winter trail networks live in harmony with semi-wilderness wildlife habitats? This question begs the need to know what wildlife habitats exist, which species live where. Where do the nature enthusiasts band their birds? Where do the deers nest their fawns? If these questions are answered, the biosphere, is truly enhanced with trails, and the next generation of skiiers, snowshoers, hikers, and bicyclers will also be handed a glimpse of a deer, and the grandchildren of the bird-banders, will also be able to band birds alongside the same trails.  Wouldn’t that be fantastic if many generations of recreational enthusiasts, could have a grand time celebrating winter, and that their great grandchildren may also see a deer in a city forest?  Is it possible and how can it be accomplished? The question now is how?

BIBLIOGRAPHY
* Benefits of Trails Hike Ontario.

Trails, Bike and Hike: Inpsiring a Healthy Environment Upper Thams River Conservation Authority. Parks Recreation and Natural Areas.

National Trails Training Partnership Wildlife and environment impacts and benefits of Trails and Greenways.

Benefits of Trails | Rails to Trails

Enhancing the Environment with Trails and Greenways. Rails to Trails Conservancy.

Trails in Saskatchewan Provincial Parks

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Stand firm. Grip hard.
Thrust upward to the skies.
Bend to the winds of heaven.
And learn tranquility.
~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Stand firm. Grip hard.
Thrust upward to the skies.
Bend to the winds of heaven.
And learn tranquility.
~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Gratitude Expressed to Hilary Gough

Thank you Tribute to Hilary Gough, Councillor Ward 2

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.” – John F. Kennedy

It is with great appreciation that the Stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area had the opportunity to meet with the councillor for Ward 2, Hilary Gough. It was an intriguing and informative community meeting regarding the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

We congratulate you, Hilary Gough, for helping us to build a well-founded, stable and united community. The meeting provided participants representing many organizations the opportunity to voice their questions and comment on issues from diverse points of view.

“To educate yourself for the feeling of gratitude means to take nothing for granted, but to always seek out and value the kind that will stand behind the action. Nothing that is done for you is a matter of course. Everything originates in a will for the good, which is directed at you. Train yourself never to put off the word or action for the expression of gratitude.” ~Albert Schweitzer

On Wednesday, October 26, 2017 Hilary Gough became the councillor for Ward 2, running against incumbent Pat Lorje, Robert Godfrey, Vernon J. Linklater, Kelly Parker and Mark Zielke.

On coming into office, Gough had an opportunity to speak with the city Of Saskatoon manager of parks, Darren Crilly. On March 29, 2017, Gough very kindly agreed to meet with concerned stakeholders in regards to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

From the April 19, 2017, Saskatoon Star Phoenix, Phil Tank mentions that “Ward 2 Coun. Hilary Gough attended the March 29 meeting and calls residents’ efforts to protect the area and raise awareness “spectacular.”

All the users and stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area were very grateful to Hilary Gough for meeting with them. The Stewards and users of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area are truly appreciative and gratified that Hilary Gough is committed to working with community, and was open to this process for community input from the participants in all their diversity in regards to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. The March 29 meeting was a huge stepping stone in community education and communication, and, we cannot say it often enough, we all thank you enormously.

As we speak in gratitude for the dedication shown by Hilary Gough for the concerns in ward 2, the comments made by Chief Seattle in 1854 come to mind when his tribe was negotiating their treaty with the United States Government;

  • “Land and man all belong to the same family”
  • “Land is sacred; the rivers are our brothers.”
  • We do not own the land but rather we just use it”
  • “There is no quiet place in white man’s world of cities; places where you can smell the wind and wildflowers, hear the whippoorwill and the mournful howl of the coyote.”*~Chief Seattle

The users of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area know that this sentiment comes home when speaking of this naturalized area, when the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area comes into our lives. The Afforestation areas in the south west sector of Saskatoon are amazing places to retreat, relax, enjoy and celebrate getting in touch and in harmony with nature. Thank you, very kindly, Hilary Gough for agreeing to meet with us.

  • “Land beneath our feet is the ashes of our grandfathers”
  • Man belongs to the earth and to harm the earth is to heap contempt upon the creator*~Chief Seattle

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

* Jonker, Peter Editor. Saskatchewan’s Endangered Spaces. An Introduction. 1992. Extension Division. University of Saskatchewan. ISBN 0-88880-259-5

Tank. Phil. Concerns raised with police over southwest Saskatoon Woodland Phil Tank, Saskatoon StarPhoenix Published on: April 19, 2017

Tank, Phil Keeping out the trash Get ready for Misaskwatomina Boulevard
July 18, 2016

Tank, Phil. Restricting vehicles in wooded area backed. Program cuts crime at Saskatoon Apartment Buildings. July 21, 2016

If you haven’t all the things you want, be grateful for the things you don’t have that you wouldn’t want.

— Unknown

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

It is not a farce.…”To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.” ~Terry Tempest Williams

 

Vision for the Future

Saskatoon has a a Strategic plan which embraces the decade 2013-2023. Within the plan are seven strategic goals to accomplish the Saskatoon Community Vision. The vision identified these seven goals from community engagement, Saskatoon Speaks.

“There are no limits to the majestic future which lies before the mighty expanse of Canada with its virile, aspiring, cultured, and generous-hearted people.
– Sir Winston Churchill”

The Strategic goal of continuous improvement is proactive, innovative, and forward thinking.

The Strategic goal of asset and financial sustainability brings forward best practices, balances debt, investment, funding plans and capital improvements when managing City goals and guidelines.

The Strategic goal, quality of life, focuses on the theme of social well being, recreation, parks and community culture. Saskatoon’s neighbourhoods and communities thrive with access to natural beauty, parks, trails, options, and an active, vibrant future. Improving quality of life examines active opportunities and services for a winter city. Saskatoon’s community spirit embraces creative ways to include all citizens, and everyone is enriched with the feeling of belonging to this rich and dynamic city. Together, with open conversation, and innovative collaboration bridges are built, focusing on services important to the community and its citizens. With pro-active quality of life, the community forges ahead together enhancing future opportunities. This strategy, quality of life, reduces and prevents crime across the city while increasing community building and meeting community needs.

Environmental leadership marks another Strategic goal. The urban forest, green open space, connect with the South Saskatchewan River resulting in a healthy and strong ecosystem supporting a lush and vigorous bio-diversity of flora and fauna in the aspen parkland biome. The City of Saskatoon respect for the environment resonates and reverberates in harmony with nature – the woodlands, wetlands and grasslands.

The Strategic goal of sustainable growth, embraces both the city centre, and shaping the city growth. This plan examines the process of updating, and establishing infill corridors, and redefining existing and new neighbourhood development.

The Strategic goal of moving around examines the efficient, accessible and comprehensive flow of people and goods around Saskatoon.

Economic Diversity and Prosperity, focusing on the City’s economy is also one of the seven Strategic goals focusing on building diverse communities with positive and successful options and thriving outcomes for entrepreneurs, unique industries, and business areas.

How will the population of Saskatoon spike over the next years? The city of Saskatoon is founded on a solid base of prosperity with a rich quality of life, and an amazing environment. The citizens are thus doubly enriched that today is sustainable with wholesome opportunities, and that the city of Saskatoon has a dynamic vision and plan for the future.

“The present is full of opportunity. Never before in the history of the planet has mankind been given the privileges and opportunities that are at his disposal today. A great light has been raised and is penetrating the darkness of the world, but alas,
too many with dust blinded eyes have yet to catch the vision. Some of us have. That is our privilege and our responsibility. ” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Read more…. Strategic Plan 2013-2023

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

It is not a farce.…”To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.” ~Terry Tempest Williams