Do One Thing

We no longer destroy great works of art. They are treasured, and regarded as of priceless value; but we have yet to attain the state of civilization where the destruction of a glorious work of Nature, whether it be a cliff, a forest, or a species of mammal or bird, is regarded with equal abhorrence

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World Wildlife Day
3 March 2018

“The preservation of animal and plant life, and of the general beauty of Nature, is one of the foremost duties of the men and women of to-day. It is an imperative duty, because it must be performed at once, for otherwise it will be too late. Every possible means of preservation,—sentimental, educational and legislative,—must be employed.” William T. Hornaday Director New York Zoological Park,  Author American Natural History President American Bison Authority.

What is the one thing that you could do for wildlife today?

“I know of no way of judging the future, but by the past.” Patrick Henry

“We no longer destroy great works of art. They are treasured, and regarded as of priceless value; but we have yet to attain the state of civilization where the destruction of a glorious work of Nature, whether it be a cliff, a forest, or a species of mammal or bird, is regarded with equal abhorrence”~William T. Hornaday

What are some things you could do for wildlife today?

  • Parents take your children out to explore, and be creative in nature.  Learn the name of a new flower.
  • Teachers grow gardens, and plant trees with classes of children, and conduct field trips to the zoo to learn “It is your Duty to protect all harmless wild things, and you must do it” ~Hornaday.
  • Science subjects embrace local nature, students learning the study of nature, the name of the flora and fauna in their neighbourhood.
  • Art classes seek to draw from nature, learning the botanical structure of plants, seeds, flowers and leaves.
  • Local and family celebration of World Wildlife Day, World Migratory Bird Day with hands on nature activities to protect wildlife and birds.
  • Provincial and national efforts to observe Arbor Day, Earth Day, and other special days with events and celebrations.
  • Boys and girls clubs, scouts, girl guides, brownies, and youth groups celebrate tree planting ceremonies, and nature watch activities.
  • A trip to the zoo, the park, the afforestation area to devote time for the observation and preservation of flora and fauna.
  • Clean up your local environment, your school yard, street, or park.
  • Do you know the local animals and plants on the endangered species list, and what they look like?  Do you know which plants are necessary to which animal?
  • Have you planted a pollinater’s garden or a native flower garden bed?
  • What can you think of?  Can you add more to the list?

The fate of wildlife, hangs today by a very delicate thread.

“Will the millions of men commanded by General Apathy now arouse, before it is too late to act?

Will the true sportsmen rise up, and do their duty, bravely and unselfishly?

Will the people with wealth to give away do their duty toward wild life and humanity, fairly and generously?

Will the zoologists awake, leave their tables in their stone palaces of peace, and come out to the firing-line?

Will the lawmakers heed the handwriting on the wall, and make laws that represent the full discharge of their duty toward wild life and humanity?

Will the editors beat the alarm-gong, early and late, in season and out of season, until the people awake?

On the answers to these questions hang the fate of the wild creatures of the world,—their preservation or their extermination.~ Hornaday”

“People take the longest possible paths, digress to numerous dead ends, and make all kinds of mistakes. Then historians come along and write summaries of this messy, nonlinear process and make it appear like a simple, straight line.”  Dean Kamen

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

“Nothing is perfect. Life is messy. Relationships are complex. Outcomes are uncertain.”   Hugh Mackay

 

Water Safety

Saskatchewan drownings


The Aug. 15, 1933 newspaper covered the story; Three city children drown in river. “Young girls die trying to save 6-year old boy. Janet Derkson, 14, Rita Hope, 10 and brother Jimmy, lose lives at Sutherland Beach; Raymond Gracewood attempts rescue.” The three children three children from two families were residents who lived in the old University Heights area (south of the CPR, in what is now Innovation Place) according to Jeff O’Brien at City archives.
The children were very used to the route, having walked on the shore trails with the father of Reta and Jimmy Hope quite often. At this time, the youth went out on their own, and went into the river water at a different location. The youngest, Jimmy was caught up in a pothole from which he could not get out. His sister, Reta went to his rescue, and was also trapped. Hearing their calls, Raymond Gracewood swam out and grabbed hold of both children. Jimmy and Reta spied Janet Derkson, also coming to help them out, and pulled away from Raymond’s grasp to reach out to Janet. Though Janet tried her best to swim out to them, she sank. This happened during the summer months, Janet Derkson was to start grade 6 that fall, Reta Hope to begin grade 5, her little brother was to start school in September.

Though all the children were originally buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in an unmarked pauper’s grave. There was a huge public outcry, upon which the city donated a regular plot and the Rotary Club purchased a headstone. The family held a vigil a few years ago, and re-dedicated the memorial.

In June of 2001, another tragedy took the life of a six year old boy who fell into the cold spring waters off the Victoria Park river dock. June 2016, saw two eight year old boys narrowly escape tragedy. The mother of one of the lads, jumped in to his rescue, and downstream, a fisherman, swam out to the rescue of the other carried away by the river.

Traveling to this year, the Saskatoon Services Fire Department were called out 13 times for rescues at the South Saskatchewan River, impressing the need to be careful around the river in both winter and summer seasons.

Though the fatalities mentioned here were children, the majority of drownings in Saskatchewan were aged 20-24 and those between 70-74. 13% of our young adult population aged 20-24 have fallen to tragic ends drowning, which works out to about 3.5 young adults out of 100,000. Water bodies such as lakes, rivers and streams take the largest numbers of victims. Young children loose their lives most commonly in pools, and bathtubs. Though lives are lost all year around, most drownings occur June July and August partaking in swimming, fishing, water activities, boating or snowmobiling.

Bylaw No. 4433 is a “bylaw of The City of Saskatoon to prohibit swimming in the South Saskatchewan River and to require water skiers to wear life jackets.” The South Saskatchewan River is subject to a strong current, fluctuating water levels, and shifting sand bars. Though there is no bylaw against wading the shallow waters of the shoreline, it is very important to be aware the river is cut by deep, fast flowing channels. These channels can readily be seen only from the high river banks with a clear sight to the river waters. Therefore, wading in the river and getting into deep waters, the same dangers will be present as for swimmers. Sandbars, provide a false sense of security, as the swiftly flowing waters can create unstable shoreline edges of the sandbar creating risk.

An ambulance paramedic stated that, “The banks become very unstable when we have lots of water moving through. All you need is for that undercurrent to grab hold of the bank, and …down your’e going to go, into the river…and that may not be a very pleasant situation for anybody.”

Lifeline states that “it is a misconception that you’re safe if you’re larger than a body of water. You can drown in just a couple of inches of water.” “Most drownings are preventable.”

Whenever you, your family, your pet are taking in the water, take care, and be cautious of the South Saskatchewan River. Saskatchewan, the provincial title honours the Cree word kisiskâciwan, describing the “fast-flowing” Saskatchewan River or the “Swift Current” of the river. Around  wetlands, or any depth of water, be cautious.

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
6 year old boy drowns while playing near river. Cobalt daily Nugget. June 4, 2001.

Hill, Andrea. Saskatchewan father drowns after saving 10-year-old son from sinking truck. National Post. July 15, 2014.

Saskatoon police say no crackdown on swimming in river. Swimming the South Saskatchewan is dangerous, officials say. CBC news June 9, 2015.

Saskatchewan communites brace for more flooding. CTV news.

Sask Drowning Report

South Saskatchewan River Jordon Cooper.

They recognize that while knowledge about nature is vital; passion is the long-distance fuel for the struggle to save what is left of our natural heritage and ~ through an emerging green urbanism ~ to reconstitute lost land and water. Passion does not arrive on videotape or on a CD; passion is personal. Passion is lifted from the earth itself by the muddy hands of the young; it travels along grass-stained sleeves to the heart. If we are going to save environmentalism and the environment, we must also save an endangered indicator species: the child in nature. Louv. 2005. p. 158

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Afforestation Area the Simple Life

“Life is not living in the suburbs with a white picket fence. That’s not life.”~Tom Brady

The Simple Life at Afforestation Areas south west of Saskatoon;

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation ARea

Unnamed Afforestation area formerly called George Genereux Park

“children’s experience with the natural world seems to be overlooked to a large extent in research on child development, but it would be interesting to examine children’s early experiences with nature and follow how those experiences in nature and follow how those experiences influence the child’s long-term comfort with and respect for the natural world ~ comfort and respect…Given the power of nature to calm and soothe us in our hurried lives, it also would be interesting to study how a family’s connection to nature influences the general quality of family relationships. Speaking from my own personal experience, my own family’s relationships have been nourished over years through shared experiences in nature ~ from sharing our toddler’s wonder upon turning over a rock and discovering a magnificent bug the size of a mouse, to paddling our old canoe down a nearby creek during the children’s school years, to hiking the mountains.” ~ Martha Farrell Erickson Louv. 2005. p. 154

They recognize that while knowledge about nature is vital; passion is the long-distance fuel for the struggle to save what is left of our natural heritage and ~ through an emerging green urbanism ~ to reconstitute lost land and water. Passion does not arrive on videotape or on a CD; passion is personal. Passion is lifted from the earth itself by the muddy hands of the young; it travels along grass-stained sleeves to the heart. If we are going to save environmentalism and the environment, we must also save an endangered indicator species: the child in nature. Louv. 2005. p. 158
“Healing the broken bond between children and nature may seem to be an overwhelming, even impossible task. But we must hold the conviction that the direction of this trend can be changed, or at least slowed. The alternative to holding and acting on that belief is unthinkable for human health and for the natural environment. The environmental attachment theory is a good guiding principle: attachment to land is good for child and land.” Louv. 2005. p 303

“To find the universal elements enough; to find the air and the water exhilarating; to be refreshed by a morning walk or an evening saunter… to be thrilled by the stars at night; to be elated over a bird’s nest or a wildflower in spring — these are some of the rewards of the simple life.”
― John Burroughs, Leaf and Tendril
.
“By simplifying our lives, we rediscover our child-like stalk of innocents that reconnects us with the central resin of our innate humanity that knows truth and goodness. To see the world through a lens of youthful rapture is to see life for what it can be and to see for ourselves what we wish to become. In this beam of newly discovered ecstasy for life, we realize the splendor of love, life, and the unbounded beauty of the natural world.”
― Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

A man who plants a tree is doing a very wonderful thing. He is setting in motion an organism which may far outlive him or his children, and year by year that tree is storing up energy and power, working with precision like a factory, but far superior to any factory of man. ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

52° 06′ 106° 45′

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Clean, Green Community Scene!

It all adds up, indeed. Good deeds such as cleaning up the community parks are truly contagious

It looks like a fantastic day for the clean up scheduled at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area on Saturday, July 9, 2016, indeed! The honourable Councillor Pat Lorje, who has done so much for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area already, will come out to the community volunteer clean up day. As well as representatives from the Meewasin Valley Authority will also bring Meewasin greetings! The Saskatoon Singing Circle, an affiliate of the Sacred Web Singers will arrive to bring some great tree songs to the volunteers in appreciation of the wonderful works to restore the forest.

The Saskatoon Community Public Health Nurse will take care of any safety concerns, and the Saskatoon City Police Community Liason Constable has also been involved with the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area clean up site inspection.

There has been an amazing response from the business and corporate community, and prizes will be randomly drawn at the end of the shifts a fantastic opportunity to offer to the volunteers appreciations for their time offered at the clean up! Remember to pick up your certificate as well before leaving, we truly wish to thank you kindly for coming out and participating.

Additionally, the weather looks like it will cooperate, so all in all, it looks like a very promising day to see immediate and tangible results from trash removal to restore the forest. It is so exciting to look forward to a public space where children, youth, and adults can gather to appreciate the forest in tidy and sanitary conditions. There is no doubt about it, protecting nature, wildlife and wild places is a great environmental community project. Cleaning the waterways and the riparian forest, protects animals, birds, fish, and plant life from the contamination that litter brings. The clean up also sends a powerful message to users of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, that someone cares about this piece of land and the West Swale wetlands, and that this is not the right area to dump their unwanted trash.

There will data cards for this summer Great Canadian Shoreline “Scavenger Hunt” to record just what has been dumped in this amazing forest. Large jugs of water and juices will be available to replenish the water bottles you bring along. Remember your cloth canvas gloves. Gardening gloves or work gloves work much better than plastic or rubber gloves. If plastic or rubber gloves are needed, they will be supplied. Wear you closed toe shoes and footwear and come dressed for the weather which looks like a grand day for the cleanup which is fantastic!

We truly look forward to meeting you at the South West Off Leash Recreation Area parking lot at 8:00 a.m. or 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, July 9, 2016 for the Clean, Green Community Scene. You will have the opportunity to meet like-minded people, and possibly start great friendships. Everyone who comes out will have a great sense of accomplishment, pride and stewardship of the environment. An important benefit of the clean up will be reduced pollution in the West Swale wetlands which directly impact the South Saskatchewan River.
The clean up will have the following impact

  • “Improves the appearance of an area that was
    previously neglected, abandoned, vandalized,
    or misused.
  • Allows community members to use and
    enjoy the improved area more than they did
    before the cleanup.
  • Strengthens the community ties of those
    involved in the cleanup.”Source

By taking part in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area clean up, you will help create a public open space ~ an urban regional park~ which is vibrant, healthy and safe! It all adds up, indeed. Good deeds such as cleaning up the community parks are truly contagious, and will have a huge impact on this amazing green space of Saskatoon as the city grows to 1/2 million by the year 2023.

 

Power-Of-Parks-Infographic-w

 

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the MVA The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)” .
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
July 9, 2016 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area CLEAN UP Day PAMPHLET