Who are the happiest people?

Remember that the happiest people are not those getting more, but those giving more.

 H. Jackson Brown Jr.

National Volunteer Week April 24 – 30, how will you celebrate? Help show the world what Saskatoon’s biodiversity looks like—grab your smartphone, the free @iNaturalist app, & join this year’s #CityNatureChallenge from April 29–May 2! Great for all ages; find details at FriendsAreas.ca 

‘Volunteering is Empathy in Action.’

“If you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view, until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.”

Atticus Finch a character in “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper Lee

Climb inside the skin of our native wildlife. Learn about the habitat for our herons, and where they might live as our cities grow larger and larger. Climb into the skin of a native butterfly and where they may fly to find a native pollinator flower that is not covered in pesticides. Climb inside the skin of the last remaining mammals and where they may live.

Volunteer with the City Nature Challenge. A great way to study range expansion and contraction, seasonal changes in morphology, the declining or increasing numbers of species at risk or invasive species. By observing local nature, everyone can support vital conservation research while connecting with nature and enjoying the outdoors.

Check out these upcoming events

City Nature Challenge Fungi and Lichen Observation Hints and Tips

Mon, Apr 25, 2022 7:00 PM CST

City Nature Challenge Insect Hints and Tips

Tue, Apr 26, 2022 7:00 PM CST

CITY NATURE CHALLENGE Connect with Nature

Fri, Apr 29, 7:00 PM

George Genereux Urban Regional Park • Saskatoon, SK

CITY NATURE CHALLENGE Connecting to Nature. Calling all Nature Lovers

Sat, Apr 30, 2:00 PM

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area •

CITY NATURE CHALLENGE Nature Lover Observation Party

Sun, May 1, 2:00 PM

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area •

CITY NATURE CHALLENGE George Genereux Nature Canvass

Mon, May 2, 7:00 PM

George Genereux Urban Regional Park • Saskatoon, SK

City Nature Challenge ID Party – Insects! Help for insect IDs/questions

Tue, May 3, 2022 7:00 PM CST

City Nature Challenge ID Party FOCUS ON PLANTS!

Wed, May 4, 2022 7:00 PM CST

City Nature Challenge I.D. Party Fungi and LIchen

Thu, May 5, 2022 7:00 PM CST

Celebrate 50 years! Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional park were planted to trees in 1972, 50 years ago. Come out and say Happy Birthday!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Donations can be made through Paypal, Canada Helps, Contact Donate A Car Canada, SARCAN Drop & Go 106100594 for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Volunteer Week!

April 24 – 30 is National Volunteer Week. Volunteer for the

City Nature Challenge – City Nature Challenge

City Nature Challenge Saskatoon and Area 2022

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/city-nature-challenge-2022-saskatoon-sk

In love with Saskatoon and Area’s incredible nature? You can help observe on iNat & protect it by joining this year’s #CityNatureChallenge, April 29–May 2! All you need to join is a smartphone and the free @inaturalist app. Learn more at FriendsAreas.ca Explore back yards, the afforestation areas, along the boulevards of our city streets, in the nooks and crannys of fences and trees. Participating is easy: just make observations of wild plants, animals, and fungi, anywhere in the Saskatoon and Area with the free @inaturalist app April 29 – May 2, and they’ll automatically be added to this project.

The CNC was organized by citizen science staff at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (Lila Higgins) and California Academy of Sciences (Alison Young). The City Nature Challenge has become a global effort for people to find and document plants and wildlife in cities across the globe in support of world conservation efforts. It’s a fun citizen science event with a challenge where cities are in a contest against each other to see who can make the most observations of nature, who can find the most species, and who can engage the most people.

Being involved is super easy!

connect with nature- fungi, insects, Plants and Wildlife

From the CNC FAQ page; Take photos, or sound recordings of “any observations of WILD plants, animals, fungi, seaweed, bacteria, lichen, etc. you find in and around your city! Observations of living or dead organisms, or evidence of those organisms, like shells, seeds, tracks, scat, pinecones, feathers, etc., are fine. Remember to make sure you’re taking good photos of the organisms!”

Take a Picture

Take a picture of what you discover in nature. The iNaturalist app records the GPS location of the critter or plant – and you can set it to obscured or leave it as publicly known. (Don’t change location to private or it won’t be part of the City Nature Challenge)

Share!

Upload, share, save your observations through iNaturalist or Ebird or Observation.org

Duties

Why participate in the City Nature Challenge?

There is nature all around us, even in our cities! As the urban footprint and the human monoculture keeps expanding, nature is often overlooked in our cities, which has become a safe haven for many wild animals who no longer have a wild habitat. You cannot protect what you don’t know, and all of us – citizen scientists, scientists, land managers, and the community – come together in Twihamwe “working together as one” to find and document the nature in our area. The Saskatchewan Motto strengthens the volunteer spirit of the City Nature Challenge’ Multis e Gentibus Vires (Latin) (“From Many Peoples Strength!”) By participating in the City Nature Challenge, you can learn more about your local nature, and at the same time you can also make your city a better place – for you and nature!

For the COVID-19 pandemic, some modifications were implemented into the City Nature Challenge 2020 and 2021 to help keep both organizers and participants safe. It is way more important to focus on collaboration rather than competition. And we want to know about and embrace the healing power of nature and encourage the sharing of unique stories, species, habitat ranges found during the CNC. Look inside your own homes, in your own yard, in your local bus stop, along your boulevard or local park. Keep safe, follow all health guidelines for COVID, follow all health guidelines for nature as well! This year’s City Nature Challenge is a hybrid between collaboration and competition.

Create your own iNaturalist account

  • Visit iNaturalist.org
  • Download the app from the AppStore or Google Play
  • Sign In
  • Start sharing your observations
  • Check back later to see the conversation about your observation!

Qualifications

iNaturalist is an free observation platform that uses both computer recognition vision technology alongside crowd sourced corroboration that acts as a place for people to record biodiversity observations, interact with other enthusiasts, and learn about organisms. Observations from iNaturalist also enrich biodiversity science within open science projects such as the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) and the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL). Scientists (and anyone) can freely access and use these data to address their research questions. iNaturalist is as easy to use as 1-2-3!

Find It

Snap It

Share It

This guide, along with YouTube Videos, and planned Virtual events for volunteers who wish to take part will walk you through recommendations for the best ways to use iNaturalist with students in formal or informal settings so they learn from the experience and contribute high-quality observations to the iNaturalist community.

What kinds of observations of nature should I make during the CNC?

Any observations of WILD plants, animals, fungi, seaweed, bacteria, lichen, etc. you find in and around your city! Remember to check under the leaves of your cultivated plants. Observations of living or dead organisms, or evidence of those organisms, like shells, tracks, scat, feathers, etc., are fine. Remember to make sure you’re taking good photos of the organisms!

Celebrate 50 years! Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional park were planted to trees in 1972, 50 years ago. Come out and say Happy Birthday!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Donations can be made through Paypal, Canada Helps, Contact Donate A Car Canada, SARCAN Drop & Go 106100594 for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Bat Appreciation Day

Isn’t it wonderful to celebrate Bat Appreciation Day occurring on April 17? How do you think it will turn out the finest?

One way would be to download the iNaturalist app, and take some photographs of bats! Have you ever done that before? Did you know that is what a chiropterologist does? A chiropterologist is someone who studies bats (the flying mammals). So, how would you learn more about being a chiropterologist?

If you have iNaturalist uploaded to your phone the magic of computer intelligence will parse the photographs and let you know what animal you have seen. There are individuals at the University of Saskatchewan and at the Saskatoon Nature Society who have thought that it may be an idea to study bats at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and at George Genereux Urban Regional Park. What do you think? I have never seen a bat in the afforestation areas- have you?

Do you think you would enjoy the City Nature Challenge taking place April 29 to May 2? What do you think is the best part about observing nature? Researchers, school groups, citizens and wildlife enthusiasts across the world will be taking part in this race against the clock to put nature on the map, submitting photos and observations of wildlife in their neighbourhoods and greenspaces through the free, easy to use iNaturalist smart phone app.

“I understood at a very early age that in nature, I felt everything I should feel in church but never did. Walking in the woods, I felt in touch with the universe and with the spirit of the universe.”

Alice Walker

Celebrate 50 years! Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional park were planted to trees in 1972, 50 years ago. Come out and say Happy Birthday!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Donations can be made through Paypal, Canada Helps, Contact Donate A Car Canada, SARCAN Drop & Go 106100594 for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Grandfather, Look at our brokenness.

Please educate yourself about the seasons when deer – vehicle collisions occur – the peak months (Nov-Dec rut and May-July fawn rearing)

The number of vehicles on Valley Road and Township Road 362A (Cedar Villa Road) has increased exponentially. There is a greenspace at Chappell Marsh Conservation Area, and right across the road is the  forest at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  It is wise to slow down; if a deer jumps out from between the trees of the forest to the farmers field, or to the conservation area, it is best to take precautions, and be safe. The number of deers killed on Valley Road and on Township Road 362A (Cedar Villa Road) is taking its toll on the animal population over the last few months, and can be disastrous for drivers.

Please be careful out there!  See also Deer – Vehicle Accidents

“The human cost of vehicle collisions with wildlife is substantial. On average 387 people are injured and 4 killed in animal related collisions on Saskatchewan roads…The peak times for collisions are dawn and dusk. Yellow wildlife warning signs indicate areas of high risk. No matter the season or time of day, it’s important to watch for signs of wildlife and reduce your speed accordingly. Slowing down reduces the distance required to stop and decreases the force of impact in the event of a collision. ”

“Reduce Speed

Speed is one of the most common factors in vehicle collisions.

Speed:Reduces the drivers ability to steer away from objects in the roadway

Speed: Extends the distance required to stop
Speed: Increases the force of impact, in the event of a collision
With good road conditions, drivers tend to increase their speed. Some studies suggest that wildlife vehicle collisions occur more than expected on clear nights, on dry road conditions and on long straight stretches. Drivers may tend to be more cautious on curves or in poor weather“ Wildlife Collision Prevention Program.

“It happens so quickly. It’s just like somebody cutting you off or something like that,” Jordan Goodlad told CBC News in describing his encounter with a deer on the road… “You almost don’t realize it ’til it’s done.” CBC News

If we are willing to be still and open enough to listen, wilderness itself will teach us. Steven Harper

“If you’ve driven on North American roads, you’ve seen roadkill – animals that have been killed by passing traffic. At some time, you may have run over a small animal on the road. You may even have had the harrowing experience of striking a large animal. “ Canada Safety Council

“Roads attract wildlife because they provide a travel corridor, easy access to vegetation and in the winter, a source of salt. ..[Fish and Wildlife] Officers advise drivers to reduce their speed at night and around water or on tree-lined roads. Scan the road and ditches for animals and use high beams when possible; deer eyes glow when struck by light. “ Tim Evans.

The fall/winter season is a busy time of year for wildlife. While we always recommend keeping an eye out, your chances of colliding with a wild animal increase from October to January. (In the spring, wildlife collisions also increase between May and June.)

Think it can’t happen to you? Check out the statistics:
Every 38 minutes in Canada, there’s 1 collision between a motor vehicle and a wild animal.
89% of collisions with wildlife happen on two-lane roads just outside cities and towns.
86% of wildlife collisions happen in on warm weather days.” SGI Canada 2017

“While a vehicular collision with a deer can be very costly and sometimes cause personal injury, a collision with a moose can have very dire consequences” says Darrell Crabbe. “That’s why we engage in this annual campaign. It is our hope that the message will save lives, both human and wildlife.” Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation

Please be careful out there!  Save a deer, and protect yourself.

Grandfather,
Look at our brokenness.
We know that in all creation
Only the human family has strayed from the Sacred Way.
We know that we are the ones who are divided.
And we are the ones who must come back together,
To walk in the Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
O Sacred One,
Teach us love, compassion and honor
That we may heal the earth
And heal each other. Ojibway Prayer

Bibliography:
Caution: Animals Crossing Traffic Safety Canada Safety CouncilCollisions involving deer, semi carring hazardous materials shut down highway south of Saskatoon. CBC News October 27 2018
Oh, deer: What to do if there’s an animal on the road Tim Evans. Oct 24 2017
Stay safe during wildlife collision season SGI Canada. Nove 27 2017
Collisions with wildlife up in Saskatchewan 980 CJME
Spike in Vehicle – Wildlife collisions causes concern Chelsea Walters. Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation.
Wildlife Collision Prevention Program
When Do Collisions with Wildlife Occur? Reducing the Risk
Wildlife Collisions SGI
Wildlife collisions rising:SGI CBC News
Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions in Canada: A Review of the Literature and a Compendium of Existing Data Sources Traffic Injury Research Foundation.

I always thought of deer as solitary animals that weren’t very interesting. But my goodness, that was very wrong. The big eye-opener for me was that they’re social. They have family groups. Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

What might you see?

What might you see if you came out to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

 

The wetlands of the West Swale is home to the Black Crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax ), of course the Mallard (Anas Platrhynchos), Red-Winged Blackbird (Agelaius Phoeniceus), Great Blue Heron (Ardea Herodias), American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos), and is a unique site in Saskatchewan to spot the ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis) (to name a very few wetlands feathered friends).

Frogs, snakes, turtles and the Barred Tiger Salamander also known as the western tiger salamander (Ambystoma mavortium) number among the amphibians in the West Swale wetlands as well.

Visitors can sight a number of birds outside the wetlands, in the woodlands and riparian zone, for instance, to name a few again, the Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus), Swainson’s hawk (Buteo swainsoni), Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides), American Robin (Turdus migratorius) makes its home here. The Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) arrives in the spring, however this prairie songbird population is declining. “Declines appear to be largely due to lost habitat — breeding and wintering habitats,” said Charles Francis, “It’s quieter, and it’s quieter because there are fewer [birds],” according to Christy Morrissey, a University of Saskatchewan avian toxicologist.

The mixed forest in the George Genereux Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area contain native and exotic trees such as the Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides), American Elm (Ulmus americana), Black Poplar (Populus balsamifera, Colorado Blue Spruce (Picea pungens), Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L), (Willow Salix), Black Balsam Poplar(Populus balsamifera), Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus), Honeysuckle (Lonicera), Canada Buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis) and Dogwood (Cornus alba).

The west Swale is also home to mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus, Striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), Moose (Alces alces), White-Tailed Jackrabbit (Lepus townsendii), Snowshoe Hare (Lepus Americanus) and Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) to name a few mammals spotted here and there.

In a city aiming to hit a population of 500,000 and 1 M in 45 years, it is pretty darn amazing that the city possesses the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, and has preserved in perpetuity these afforestation areas.  The city is in the process of developing the Blairmore Sector Plan Report and a wetlands policy for areas within the city of Saskatoon which will include the afforestation areas and the West Swale  The P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Plan is developing their naturalized area study, developing plans such as the Green Network Study Area and provide for West Swale considerations outside of Saskatoon City limits.

In your considered opinion, will a swale which contains wetlands and drains into the South Saskatchewan River – filtering and cleaning the drinking water through the afforestation areas), and a swale which feeds the underground aquifers benefit the city in its march to become a metropolis?  What do you think, when the city reaches 1 M in a few short years wouldn’t it be fantastic to have afforestation areas to mitigate climate change and mitigate flooding on surrounding lands,  provide carbon sequestration, and delight the eye with magnificent woodlands nurturing a semi wilderness habitat?

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
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2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

The Tick

How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

A teeming life goes on in the forest without any of the problems that confront mankind in similar circumstances. There are no dustbins, no water-borne sewage, no town clerks or city councilors or armies of officials, with more and more rates to pay, no ever-growing burden of debt.

The forest solves its own sanitary problems by direct action while man evades them. The forest has been described as the perfect sanitarian, the supreme chemist. In its economy it perfectly combines Capitalism, Communism and Social Credit and instead of building up a burden of debt it stores up real wealth of the woods.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Your pet may travel outdoors, and bring home ticks attached to them. If it is the beginning of the tick season, ie early spring around Easter, the ticks are small. These ticks will take a blood meal, drop off the host animal, and enlarge in size. Next time they attach to a host animal, it is probably a larger species, and again the now larger tick will take a blood meal. The tick will either stay on the host animal and breed, or drop off and begin again to find another host animal.

When a tick lays eggs, there are several thousands of eggs, which then hatch, and feed on the host animal. Or the eggs may drop off infesting the new locality.

One method to keep your home and yard safer is to sprinkle diatomaceous earth (de). “Diatomaceous earth is composed of tiny organisms known as diatoms which have the ability to lacerate the exoskeletons of various types of insects and kill them through dehydration.How” “Make sure you buy food grade diatomaceous earth, NOT the pool filter grade which is heat and chemically treated and is TOXIC if ingested.Food” Food grade de is non toxic to humans and pets. One way to subvert a tick infestation in your living environment. Within 2-3 weeks the tick problem should be eradicated at your home. In this era of climate warming, and phenology changes be knowledgeable in the application of diatomaceous earth outside as it effects a number of insects. Use of diatomaceous earth outdoors is defeated with a rain storm, and a re-application is needed.

Sprinkling your shoes, socks and pants with diatomaceous earth is another way to protect yourself from ticks. Likewise sprinkling your pets will serve to be a natural tick repellent, it will dry out their skin also, so apply it in a fine layer only using an applicator such as a salt or sugar shaker filled with diatomaceous earth. “Diatomaceous Earth is very useful as a detox solution, digestive aid and colon cleanser. For dogs, use one tablespoon per day of food grade Diatomaceous Earth in his food for dogs over 55 lbs. and one teaspoon per day for small dogs and puppies.benefits For the human diet diatomaceous earth “(1) helps move things out of your intestines and (2) helps promote healthier hair, skin, bones, and joints.” The silica content in diatomaceous earth will help the body absorb calcium, and enrich skin collagen, bones, nails and hair. For pets and their owners, diatomaceous earth has been recommended for colon cleansing, parasite control, and as a form of detox.

“You should treat your dog’s bedding with diatomaceous earth twice a week, leaving it for about 3 days. Repeat this process whenever your dog spends time in the woods, tall grasses, or around rodents.  Insect infestations are usually eradicted in 2-3 weeks.

One possible reason for tick population surge, is phenology. Insect life cycles react to “degree days” local daily sun and moon cycles reacting with great rapidity to climate change and milder winters. Bird life cycles rely on the amount of available sunlight seen to change in seasonal monthly and earth rotational cycles. If migrating birds arrive in the northern hemisphere too late to feast on small grubs and insect larvae. It is known that bird migratory patterns are changing, so “bird migration, breeding, and nesting are timed every spring to coincide with the peak availability of critical food sources.<a href=”Wildlife.org” Until these phenological cycles balance, the populations of insects are on the rise, and populations of birds are declining. For those who are trying to control tick populations on acreages and large land areas, the Guineafowl or poultry may come in handy.

For people walking in long grass or in woodlands, a precaution is to carry a tweezer or “tick twister” on the walk and wear light coloured clothing, tucking pants into socks, and shirts into waistbands. The light coloured clothing helps to sight ticks on their slow journey upwards. Tucking in your clothing thus keeps the ticks on top of the clothing, and not underneath on your skin. People who are not using the non-toxic natural remedy of diatomaceous earth those folks can spray with an insect repellent containing deet. When you arrive home, pop into the shower, to wash off any ticks unseen and unspotted. Throw your clothing directly into the washing machine, so any undetected ticks do not end up infesting the household.  Don’t wander around “blindly”, but arm yourself with a bit of knowledge to have a safe walk with your four-legged friend.

For your pet, fill up a child’s wading pool in your yard when the weather is warmer. Then go for a walk with your dog. When you arrive back home, the sun will have warmed the chilly water from the hose. It will be easier to pop your dog into the warmer water of the wading pool outdoors, and this quick bath may rid your pet of any ticks your eyes have missed. The slicking down of the fur in the water may also help to reveal the missed ticks.

Dogs which have been out and about in a tick area should be immediately checked for ticks when leaving the site. Using tweezers or a “tick-twister” remove the tick without placing a lot of pressure on the tick body. With tweezers, secure the tweezer ends at the tick mouth where the tick has entered the skin and pull straight up and out. To keep your pet safe, walk on mowed paths, dirt, asphalt, concrete or wooden walkways.  Avoiding long grass and shrubbery will help your pets not arrive home with ticks.

Pets can also be treated with any number of over the counter “tick ointments and sprays.”  Many products are applied to the back of the neck with an effectiveness of about 21 days, being strongest in efficacy at the beginning, and waning towards the end of the treatment cycle.  These applications may help your dog from infestation, however on personal experience, attending to ticks on your pets with a tweezer or “tick twister” is the most effective method.  Relying on tick products may still reveal tick eggs and fully mature ticks burrowed into your pet even with tick applications.  Tick ointments also become diluted and less effective when your pet gets wet, ie a dog shower or bath, or an outdoor swim.  However, don’t reapply tick applications without your vet’s knowledge, as the dog’s immune system can usually handle one application every 21 days, as the application is mildly toxic to your pets as well as containing poisonouse substances to the tick.

If you are bitten, record the date, keep the tick on hand in a sealed bottle and take a picture of it. Watch for a “bull’s eye” rash, one of the early warning signs for Lyme disease. With early medical intervention, serious bodily reaction to the tick bite can be averted.

In Saskatoon, food grade diatomaceous earth can be purchased from a store such as Early’s seed and feed. Be safe, arm yourself with knowledge. If you walk in the grasslands or in the woods where ticks may be present, take precautions for yourself and your pet.

We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Becker, Dr. Tea Tree Oil Great for your cuts, but use with caution on pets

How to kill fleas and ticks with Diatomaceous Earth

Kill bugs with diatomaceous earth Lifehacker.com

Food grade diatomaceous earth for flea and tick treatment. Wolf Creek Ranch.

Gauthier, Kimberly Using Diatomaceous Earth for Natural flea and tick control Pet 360

Pleasant, Barbara. Tick Prevention and Management.
How to safely remove ticks A Mother’s Heritage.
Natural Tick Control For Your Home

Roberts, Kevin. Tick Talk: Do all Natural DIY Tick Repellents really work? May 26, 2015. Petguide.com

Scott, Dana The Benefits Of Diatomaceous Earth For Dogs Dogs Naturally Magazine.

The Effectiveness of Diatomaceous earth Insect list

Tudor, Ken Dr. Is Tea Tree Oil Safe for Pets? PetMd.

Winter, Catherine. DIY Homemade Insect Repellent Sprays and Lotions

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

It is not a farce.…”To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.” ~Terry Tempest Williams

 

World Wildlife Day ~ March 3

Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.~Albert Einstein

 

 

The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) decided to proclaim 3 March, the day of the adoption of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), as World Wildlife Day.

“The preservation of animal and plant life, and of the general beauty of Nature, is one of the foremost duties of the men and women of to-day. No man has a right, either moral or legal, to destroy or squander an inheritance of his children that he holds for them in trust.

Wild life can be saved! The means by which it can be saved are: Money, labor and publicity.

Every possible means of preservation,—sentimental, educational and legislative,—must be employed. It is an imperative duty, because it must be performed at once, for otherwise it will be too late, speaks William T. Hornaday Sc.D., Director of the New York Zoologial Park, Author of “The American Natural History” and ex-president of the American Bison Society.

Do you know what Saskatchewan endangered wildlife species look like? Do you know what their habitat looks like? Do the flora and fauna listed here require wetlands, tall grasslands, arid plains, riparian woodlands, or mixed zones?  Do you know the range in Saskatchewan where you may see these endangered species of Saskatchewan ~ north, south central, east, west?  Today is the day for you, personally, to find out before it is too late!  Can you identify the flora and fauna in the semi-wilderness wildlife habitat of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area of the city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan?

  • Burrowing Owl Athene cunicularia
  • Piping Plover Charadrius melodus
  • Sage Grouse Centrocercus urophasianus
  • Whooping Crane Grus americana
  • Swift Fox Vulpes velox
  • Sand Verbena Abronia micrantha
  • Western Spiderwort Tradescantia occidentalis
  • Tiny Cryptanthe Cryptantha minima
  • Hairy Prairie-clover Dalea villosa

Saskatchewan Wildlife at Risk:

Biodiversity; Species at Risk Government of Saskatchewan. About Environment, Programs and services.

Biodiversity Saskatchewan Species at Risk. Saskatchewan Econet.

Ecology Camps for Kids University of Saskatchewan.

Fauna of Saskatchewan Wikipedia.

Floraof Saskatchewan Wikipedia.

List of Mammals in Saskatchewan Wikipedia.

Outdoor Education : Species at Risk Regina Public Schools

Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference. Feb 16 17 18 2016 Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan
(SK PCAP)

S.O.S. Stewards of Saskatchewan Nature Saskatchewan.

Wildlife Viewing Tourism Saskatchewan.

Wild plants and animals protected. Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management Minister Lorne Scott. Government of Saskatchewan. March 3, 1999

I believe in oneness of mankind and of all living things and in the interdependence of each and all. I believe that unless we play fair to the Earth, we cannot exist physically on this planet. Unless we play fair to our neighbour, we cannot exist socially or internationally. Unless we play fair to better self, there is no individuality and no leadership. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

 

Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.~Albert Einstein

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’” ~ Richard St Barbe Baker

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