Longevity from trees 

Living near green spaces linked to longer lives, study finds. Being around vegetation decreased risk of mortality from common causes of death by 8-12%. CBC News. October 11, 2017

Living Close To Trees May Help You Live Longer: Study.  A new study finds that people who lived close to trees or vegetation had an eight to 12 per cent reduced risk of dying compared to those that didn’t.  Huffington post 10/11/2017

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…today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth.  Richard St. Barbe Baker

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Tragedy Averted

“If there had been a fire here when that wind came up it would have been roaring in the cañon now. The storm would have swept it down on the trees there, and the whole gully would soon have become a roaring furnace. Better cut out the fire.” ~G. Harvey Ralphson

It is with wondrous elation, that there are forest scouts keeping an eye on the George Genereux Afforestation Area, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area along with all the city parks. It is with gratitude that the Saskatoon Fire Department is on top of fire prevention in the city of Saskatoon.

Fire prevention week is October 8-14.  Check the fire prevention tips, and classroom study.

“If the forest has a day of fire and the heat of the flames does not consume a special tree, it will still be changed; charred, but still standing.”Dan Groat

Prevention How To’s

Preventing Wild Fires – for kids

 

Of the earth’s thirty billion acres, already nine billion acres are desert. And if a man loses a third of his skin, he dies; plastic surgeons say “He’s had it.” And if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it dies. And if the earth loses one-third of its green mantle of trees, it will die. The water table will sink beyond recall and life on this planet will become impossible. It’s being skinned alive today. ” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

 

 

 

Measure Progress with your Camera

September 30, 2017

Save your Photos Day!

“Almost everywhere in the world man has been disregarding the Divine Law and the Laws of Nature, to his own undoing. In his pride, he has rampaged over the stage of the earth, forgetting that he is only one of the players put there to play his part in harmony and oneness with all living things.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Can this be true?  Are the animal species in decline?  What has been done to the environment  with the increase of forest fires?  In years gone by stories were told of animals pressed south escaping the heat of the forest fires.  This year on camping trips were the sounds of gun fire heard protecting the urban centres from the wild beast seeking safe haven from the forest fires raging around them?  Just as urban centres needed to evacuate, so to, the wild animal would need to evacuate the forest, to find what?  Is there a safe place for the forest animal to escape the forest fire?

If cities are ever expanding and agricultural land fills up the rural country side, where, then are the forests, the native flora and fauna?  Can there be any forest stories still to be told?  Will our grandchildren know the deer, the beaver and the squirrel?  What is being done to save our forests, to save the native flora and fauna?

“Progress does not have to be patented to be worthwhile. Progress can also be measured by our interactions with nature and its preservation. Can we teach children to look at a flower and see all the things it represents: beauty, the health of an ecosystem, and the potential for healing? ” Richard Louv

Do you enjoy a relaxing picnic in the woods?  Have you walked barefoot down the pathways?  Have you caught on photograph the tender wild strawberry leaf in the morning dew?  Do you sight through your camera the dazzling show of the sun backlit on the forest leaves?

It is vital to celebrate our forests, and the celebration of life and beauty.  Save your photo in  your forest story you may wish to add to the 150 forest story compilation today! Saskatoon’s Forests. Our 150 Forest Stories, Our Future, Celebrating Saskatoon’s Forests!

Let us rejoice in the wonder of nature and our environment,as Richard St. Barbe Baker says;

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

How rich is Saskatoon?


Saskatoon’s Forests.

Our 150 Forest Stories, Our Future, Celebrating Saskatoon’s Forests!

During Canada’s 150 anniversary, is it possible to compile 150 Forest Stories of Saskatoon?

What kind of forest stories does Saskatoon have to share with the world?  Could it be that the life of a tree is a life of service?  Is it as Richard Louv says; ” “We have such a brief opportunity to pass on to our children our love for this Earth, and to tell our stories. These are the moments when the world is made whole. In my children’s memories, the adventures we’ve had together in nature will always exist.”

Canadian Forestry Association announces 2017 National Forest Week , September 24th to 30th, 2017, Theme: Canada’s Forests: Our stories, Our Future  Celebrating Canada’s Forests!

The Canadian Institute of Forestry has a 2017 National Forest Week Event Calendar whereupon, the citizens can celebrate National Forest Week locally with the 150 Forest Story event in Saskatoon.

The Canadian Forestry Association invite you to celebrate National Forest week in your neck of the wood!

Richard St. Barbe Baker embraced our future in forests;…today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth.” Richard St. Barbe Baker “We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.”

Can you add one Sasaktoon forest story to the 150 Saskatoon forest stories collection?

Email your story

You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover “~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For more information:

“Passion is lifted from the earth itself by the muddy hands of the young; it travels along grass-stained sleeves to the heart. If we are going to save environmentalism and the environment, we must also save an endangered indicator species: the child in nature.”
― Richard Louv

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

 

Prayer of the Woods

Friday September 29, 2017

World Heart Day

What are your body’s bio rhythms?  Are you in tune with the rising and the setting of the sun?  Are you aware of the season change and the equinox on your body?  Living in urban centres in the industrialized world have removed the majority of the population from the forest, the electrical light have de-sensitized the body to the cycles of daylight, our heart and cardiovascular system work in tune to clocks, calendar schedules, and a face paced life to meet deadlines.  Where is the time spent breathing slowly and deeply and becoming attune to the rhythm and flow of our bodies in the forest?  Who re-charges their hearts and bodies at day break with a saunter in the woods?  Who winds down the day with a relaxing stroll through the forest to ready the mind-body for sleep?  Do you know when the next full moon or new moon is?

Studies have proven that walking in the forest has cardiovascular benefits.  Hospital gardens,  Shinrin-Yoku or forest bathing researchers are all finding calming, relaxing benefits on the cardiovascular system as compared to those walking a brick and ashpalt urban setting.

““We performed field experiments in four different local areas to evaluate the physiological benefits of forest walking. Our data indicated that the forest walking program has a positive influence on cardiovascular relaxation.””…”participants felt more comfortable, soothed, and natural after forest walking than after urban walking both before and after activities,” stated researchers from Finland, Japan and Korea

“Time spent walking and relaxing in a forest environment (“forest bathing” or “forest therapy”) has well demonstrated anti-stress effects in healthy adults… Blood pressure and several physiological and psychological indices of stress were measured the day before and approximately 2 h following forest therapy… Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), urinary adrenaline, and serum cortisol were all significantly lower than baseline following forest therapy … Subjects reported feeling significantly more “relaxed” and “natural” ” Researchers

Polizzi states that the Journal of Alternative And Complimentary Medicine, walking barefoot “reduces blood viscosity, which is a major factor in cardiovascular disease”.  Yoga practitioners practice cleansing  throughout the body by walking barefoot.

Prayer of the Woods
“I am the heat of your hearth on the cold winter nights, the friendly shade screening you from the summer sun, and my fruits are refreshing draughts quenching your thirst as you journey on.
I am the beam that holds your house, the board of your table, the bed on which you lie, and the timber that builds your boat.
I am the handle of your hoe, the door of your homestead, the wood of your cradle, and the shell of your coffin.
I am the bread of kindness and the flower of beauty. ‘Ye who pass by, listen to my prayer: Harm me not.”
 Portuguese legend

Have you every cared for your heart by planning a walk in the forest?  Have you ever turned on your phone app and plotted a nature trail where you have wandered to share with others?  What about You Tube?  Have you ever filmed your walk, and uploaded your movie to YouTube to share the beauty of the natural forest you visited?  Help others to discover nature, to heal their heart, just by telling your story.   \Add your forest story to the 150 forest story compilation today!

“We believe in the innate intelligence of the villagers, the country men and the workers, that they should be allowed to manage their own affairs. We believe they will put into their work not merely their hands and their feet, but their brains and their hearts. Each can experience the transcendental joy of creation, and can earn immortality and bestow immortality.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Case, Adams Naturopath.  Forest Walking Reduces Anxiety, Produces Heart Benefits   Heal Naturally
Science-based Natural Health. Realnatural, Inc

Franklin, Deborah How Hospital Gardens Help Patients Heal  Hospital gardens turn out to have medical benefits Scientific American  March 1, 2012

Hiroko Ochiai,1, Harumi Ikei,2, Chorong Song,2, Maiko Kobayashi,3 Ako Takamatsu,4 Takashi Miura,5 Takahide Kagawa,6 Qing Li,3 Shigeyoshi Kumeda,7 Michiko Imai,8 and Yoshifumi Miyazaki2,*  Physiological and Psychological Effects of Forest Therapy on Middle-Aged Males with High-Normal Blood Pressure Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Mar; 12(3): 2532–2542. Published online 2015 Feb 25. doi:  10.3390/ijerph120302532  PMCID: PMC4377916

Jae-un, Limb Forest healing prevents cardiovascular disease Department Global Communication and Contents Division, KoreaNet Sci-Tech. Feb 28, 2014

Juyoung Lee, Yuko Tsunetsugu, Norimasa Takayama, et al., “Influence of Forest therapy on Cardiovascular Relaxation in Young Adults,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2014, Article ID 834360, 7 pages, 2014. doi:10.1155/2014/834360

Keys, Jon Licensed Professional Counselor and Herbalist  Healing the Heart: Exploring Heart Rate Variability and Trauma 

Murata T, Takahashi T, Hamada T, Omori M, Kosaka H, Yoshida H, Wada Y. Individual trait anxiety levels characterizing the properties of zen meditation. Neuropsychobiology. 2004;50(2):189-94. http://www.karger.com/?DOI=10.1159/000079113

Telpner, Meghan. Into The Woods: Healing Benefits of Forest Bathing

Tobaldini E, Nobili L, Strada S, Casali KR, Braghiroli A, Montano N. Heart rate variability in normal and pathological sleep. Front Physiol. 2013 Oct 16;4:294. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2013.00294

Polizzi, Nick.  Can walking barefoot heal your heart?  August 1st, 2017

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

 

The life of a tree is a life of service

Urban Forestry Offices of Canadian Civic Governments~ Saskatoon ~”
Trees play a significant role in our quality of life and provide a positive effect by beautifying our city for residents and tourists to enjoy. All trees that grow in Saskatoon are part of the urban forest including trees on both private and public property.” Canadian Forests

 

The citizens who live in Saskatoon have a keen and vibrant interest in Saskatoon’s urban forest! The City of Saskatoon has a legacy of honouring forests.  This year for the 2017 National Forest Week,  September 24th to 30ththe theme is Canada’s Forests: Our Stories, Our Future Celebrating Canada’s Forests!  What are some of the City of Saskatoon’s forest stories?

  1. The SOS Elms Coalition has published two City of Saskatoon tree tour booklets, one in 2004 and an update in 2015
  2. The Sutherland Forest Nursery Station supplied about 150 million trees across Saskatchewan to homesteaders in the early twentieth century.  This nursery has become the Saskatoon Forestry Farm Park in 1968 and is today honoured as a National Historic site.
  3. Saskatoon also is host to an “Enchanted Forest”   The Enchanted Forest glowing is a time when the visitors to the Enchanted Forest become tender and enamoured with love and kindred spirit.  It is a celebration of the holiday season embracing the very idea of loving others, embracing childhood memories and becoming as a child enraptured in delight again.
  4. The Patterson’s Garden Arboretum is honoured by the Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), is part of Canada’s Garden Route and is treasured in Saskatoon’s Register of Historic Places and is a priority of the  City of Saskatoon Municipal Heritage Advisory Committee (MHAC) 
  5. The Fred Mitchell Memorial Gardens  is another gem of Saskatoon, a forest, placed by City of Saskatoon residents on Saskatoon’s Register of Historic Places.  
  6. Saskatoon’s Memorial Avenue was begun by the Saskatoon branch of the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire that who stated that:“A tree is a living memorial often more enduring than marble or bronze; a tree is a thing of beauty and of inspiration — a living token of the wonder and glory of nature– a symbol of service– for the life of a tree is a life of service, even the end of life is not the end of a tree’s service; to the contrary, the end of a life opens new fields of service which add immeasurably to our civilization, our culture, and our happiness; therefore, is not a tree a fitting symbol for those valiant men who gave their lives for the service of their country and who died that humanity might continue to live in civilization, in culture, and in happiness?”
  7. The Meewasin Memorial Forest within the Gabriel Dumont Park is a living tribute to bring comfort to the family, and honour of a dearly departed loved one.  Richard St. Barbe Baker, himself had spoken to his close friends of wishes to be fulfilled on his passing.  One wish was that a large tree would grace his burial site.  When Baker ~ the founder of the International Tree Foundation (Men of the Trees Organization)  died on 9 June 1982 during his visit to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, he planted his last tree on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan where he was one of the first students.   Baker is, indeed, buried near at a site with two large spruce trees in Woodlawn Cemetery, Saskatoon.  *Let children walk with Nature, let them see the beautiful blendings and communions of death and life, their joyous inseparable unity, as taught in woods and meadows, plains and mountains and streams of our blessed star, and they will learn that death is stingless indeed, and as beautiful as life. ~John Muir
  8. The Meewasin Valley Authority, as well, has initiated the “Plant a Tree” Program.  “Planting and growing increasing quantities of trees is the scientific solution to Earth’s environmental dilemma.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker  Not only did Baker plant a tree in a public ceremony before his passing by some estimates, organizations Richard St. Barbe Baker founded or assisted have been responsible for planting at least 26 trillion trees, internationally.   One of the organistions is the International Tree Foundation which began in Kenya with the first Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees. These forest scouts promised that they would indeed protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

This preceding listing of eight stories honouring the forests and trees of Saskatoon is by no means complete, thee is a resplendent River Valley along the South Saskatchewan River, and the city of Saskatoon is bedecked with an urban forest of boulevards, parks, named heritage parks, municipal reserves and green spaces.

Amongst the honour of forests and green spaces is the story of two more forests the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the adjoining afforestation area “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park in the City of Saskatoon

1960  the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, the “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park and a third afforestation area lands were bought

1972 sees drought resistant trees, Scotch Pine, Caragana, Elm, Balsam Poplar, Colorado Blue Spruce planted in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the”George Genereux” Urban Regional Park and the third afforestation area. In total 355 acres of afforestation areas were planted that year.  In 1973, 355 additional acres are planted.  Originally 2,300 acres were envisioned.

1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before council that these first  660 acres of afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity.Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the adjoining afforestation area “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park are part of these first 660 acres along with a third afforestation area on the other side of the river south of Gabriel Dumont Park, and in 1972 west of the golf course.

1978 Oct 19 Name “Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area” brought forward to city council; Dec 28, 1978 proposed that the area become a park; Jan 2, 1979, this is recommended by council.  The name George Genereux is also brought forward.

1985 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is dedicated June 15

…today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Do you know of another Saskatoon forest which is special to you, and bears a particular story.   Please take time to share your story as well as the stories listed above.  Wouldn’t it be fantastic to have 150 Forest Stories of Saskatoon in honour of Canada’s 150 birthday?
 2017 National Forest Week,  September 24th to 30ththe theme is Canada’s Forests: Our Stories, Our Future Celebrating Canada’s Forests!

Come to the woods, for here is rest. There is no repose like that of the green deep woods. Sleep in forgetfulness of all ill.     

John Muir

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker