We are one

International Day of Neutrality
12 December, 2018

“I picture village communities of the future living in valleys protected by sheltering trees on the high ground. They will have fruit and nut orchards and live free from disease and enjoy leisure, liberty and justice for all, living with a sense of their one-ness with the earth and with all living things.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“As Article 2 of the UN charter obligates member states to settle their international disputes by peaceful means and to refrain from the threat or the use of force in their relations, the General Assembly reaffirmed those obligations in its resolution 71/275.~United Nations

 

After graduating with a Diploma in Forestry from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge in 1920 Richard St. Barbe Baker’s was posted by the Colonial Office to Kenya, Africa to serve as Assistant Conservator of Forests.   In that particular position, St. Barbe was to further the economic advantage of the colony in the knowledge of which wood may be sold in the British Market, and to ensure a good stock of wood into the future.  However, on arriving in Kenya, and assessing the situation, St. Barbe could foresee the dire effects of clear cutting the forests, and the ensuing desert like conditions forming.

“Trees worked for millions of years to make it possible for man to come on this planet. Yet man, who owns his presence on this Earth to trees, has been cutting, burning, greedily and recklessly. He has turned the forest into desert, until today we are faced not only with a timber famine, but with a food famine.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Reports had arrived” to the ears of Richard St. Barbe Baker,  “of what was happening to the north where the tribes had been caught in a wedge of vanishing forest with hundreds of miles of desert in front of them and desert closing in behind them. Chiefs had forbidden marriage and women refused to bear children for they were driven before the oncoming desert and could already see their end in sight.[3]”

“To be in a better position to help them I studied their language, their folklore and tribal customs, and was initiated into their secret society, an ancient institution which safeguarded the history of the past which was handed down by word of mouth through its members.

Soon I came to understand and love these people and wanted to be of service to them. They called me “Bwana M‘Kubwa,” meaning “Big Master,” but I said, “I am your M‘tumwe” (slave).[2]” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker
Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan,
University Archives & Special Collections

Introduction of an Initiation Ceremony, at which a large dance was held, and the first Forest Guides were selected.  These, the “Watu wa Miti,” did solemnly vow; “I promise before N’gai to do at least one good deed each day, to plant 10 trees a year, and take care of trees everywhere.”  Following this ceremony they are given a password, which interpreted means “We are one.”[2]

Watu Wa Miti translates to Men of the Trees

The good deed of the day part of the oath was not immediately understood, and though it was admirable that a Forest Nursery was started, Richard St. Barbe Baker encouraged the new Forest Guides to search their hearts for guidance, and find other good deeds to do.  This led to acts of kindness saving lives and property, and grew to encompass an “esprit de corps” and hospitality between tribes working peacefully together.  Inter-tribal warfare was set aside, no longer was their desperation, but the development of home, life, and opportunity in brotherhood.

“Peace cannot be achieved through violence, it can only be attained through understanding.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“—the UNDERSTANDING—who does not know that, as it is the most elevated faculty of the soul, so it is employed with a greater and more constant delight than any of the other. Its searches after truth are a sort of hawking and hunting, wherein the very pursuit makes a great part of the pleasure. Every step the mind takes in its progress towards Knowledge makes some discovery, which is not only new, but the best too, for the time at least, speaks John Locke,

“For the understanding, like the eye, judging of objects only by its own sight, cannot but be pleased with what it discovers, having less regret for what has escaped it, because it is unknown. Thus he who has raised himself above the alms-basket, and, not content to live lazily on scraps of begged opinions, sets his own thoughts on work, to find and follow truth, will (whatever he lights on) not miss the hunter’s satisfaction; every moment of his pursuit will reward his pains with some delight; and he will have reason to think his time not ill spent, even when he cannot much boast of any great acquisition.”

“We believe in the innate intelligence of the villagers, the country men and the workers, that they should be allowed to manage their own affairs. We believe they will put into their work not merely their hands and their feet, but their brains and their hearts. Each can experience the transcendental joy of creation, and can earn immortality and bestow immortality.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker The New Earth Charter

The resolution [71/275] also underlined that some states’ national policies of neutrality can contribute to the strengthening of international peace and security and play an important role in developing mutually beneficial relations among countries of the world.” ~United Nations

David Hume explains, “But could such dogmatical reasoners become sensible of the strange infirmities of human understanding, even in its most perfect state, and when most accurate and cautious in its determinations; such a reflection would naturally inspire them with more modesty and reserve, and diminish their fond opinion of themselves, and their prejudice against antagonists.”

“The duty of holding a neutral conduct may be inferred without anything more, from the obligation which justice and humanity impose on every nation, in cases in which it is free to act, to maintain inviolate the relations of peace and amity toward other nations.”~George Washington.

But before all things, a means must be devised for improving the understanding and purifying it,” Baruch Spinoza elaborates, “as far as may be at the outset, so that it may apprehend things without error, and in the best possible way.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1/ Bacher, John. Canadian Soldiers Hugged the Trees. Richard St.Barbe Baker and Mahatma Gandhi’s vision of a green peace Peace Magazine

2/ Baker, Richard St. Barbe.  “Men of the Trees.” Canadian Forest and Outdoors Magazine, 1924

3/ Baker, Richard St. Barbe.  The Sahara: an ever-present challenge Unasylva – No. 93. Vol. 23 (2) – Number 93, 1969. An International Review of Forestry and Forest Products edited by L.J. Vernell FAO

4/ Purchia, Robyn. Man of the Trees, Richard St. Barbe Baker. Edenkeeper.  September 6th, 2014.

5/ Stockman, Robert.  The Man of the Trees and the Great Green Wall: A Baha’i’s Environmental Legacy for the Ages Wilmette Institute.  September 1, 2014

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

The Province of Saskatchewan Motto:

Multis e gentibus vires (From Many Peoples Strength)

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

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The stone and the worm

World Soil Day
5 December 2018

“As long as a soil is covered with forest, its humus is maintained. The basic forest problem lies in its composition and regeneration. In the forest the process of decay and growth always balance one another. The vegetable wastes together with the by-products of the animal population form a mixture on the forest floor. As we examine this mixture from time to time we  find it remains practically constant in depth, in spite of annual additions from leaf-fall that take place. This mixture is drawn upon at an even rate by earthworms, fungi and bacteria, and the resulting humus in turn is absorbed by the soil and provides the trees and under growth with the food materials they require. Thus the forest manures itself and with the help of the earthworms and other animal distributes this manure through the upper layers of the soil. Everything is done by Nature quietly and efficiently. No artificial fertilizers, no selective weed killers, no pesticides and no machinery are needed in the household of the natural forest.~Richard St. Barbe Baker My Life My Trees

 

“The great Empires of Assyria, Babylon, Carthage and Persia were destroyed by floods and deserts let loose in the wake of forest destruction. Erosion following forest destruction and soil depletion has been one of the most powerfully destructive forces in bringing about the downfall of civilizations and wiping out human existence from large tracts of the earths surface. Erosion does not march with a blast of trumpets or the beating of drums, but its tactics are more subtle, more sinister.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker- I Planted Trees – 1944

 

“The worm is the best farm worker. Darwin told us all there was to know about the life history of the worm. But what he didn’t teach us is how to harness the worm. And this I’ve been trying to do for the past forty years. To teach people how to use the worm on their farms and in their gardens by helping them to increase the humus, aerate the soil. And on the fringe of the Sahara and in Israel where I started planting trees over fifty years ago, we put a stone or a couple of stones for every tree on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho in our plantations in the Judean hills. And if a goat knocked a stone off, the tree would die.

“The stone is there to water the tree; this is what we call stone mulching or top mulching. The stone draws down the heat and it draws up the heat from below and draws up the moisture and will protect the worm. The worm will come up and down, and enjoy a cool night under the stone in the moisture that is accumulated under the stone. And in the morning the worm goes down again.

“If you pick up that stone you’ll see two or three worms just underneath, all in the cool and damp. But what is not generally understood is that you can’t have superphosphate and worms. The worms don’t like the superphosphate or any of the chemicals or weed killers and things you put on the crops now, these selective killers. You have to make up your mind whether you’re going to harness the worm or you’re going to work for the chemical merchant.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

  The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain. Richard St. Barbe Baker

The Best Soil Worker

World Soil Day
5 December 2018

WorldSoilDayLogo

“As long as a soil is covered with forest, its humus is maintained. The basic forest problem lies in its composition and regeneration. In the forest the process of decay and growth always balance one another. The vegetable wastes together with the by-products of the animal population form a mixture on the forest floor. As we examine this mixture from time to time we find it remains practically constant in depth, in spite of annual additions from leaf-fall that take place. This mixture is drawn upon at an even rate by earthworms, fungi and bacteria, and the resulting humus in turn is absorbed by the soil and provides the trees and under growth with the food materials they require. Thus the forest manures itself and with the help of the earthworms and other animal distributes this manure through the upper layers of the soil. Everything is done by Nature quietly and efficiently. No artificial fertilizers, no selective weed killers, no pesticides and no machinery are needed in the household of the natural forest.~Richard St. Barbe Baker My Life My Trees

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“The worm is the best farm worker. Darwin told us all there was to know about the life history of the worm. But what he didn’t teach us is how to harness the worm. And this I’ve been trying to do for the past forty years. To teach people how to use the worm on their farms and in their gardens by helping them to increase the humus, aerate the soil. And on the fringe of the Sahara and in Israel where I started planting trees over fifty years ago, we put a stone or a couple of stones for every tree on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho in our plantations in the Judean hills. And if a goat knocked a stone off, the tree would die.

“The stone is there to water the tree; this is what we call stone mulching or top mulching. The stone draws down the heat and it draws up the heat from below and draws up the moisture and will protect the worm. The worm will come up and down, and enjoy a cool night under the stone in the moisture that is accumulated under the stone. And in the morning the worm goes down again.

“If you pick up that stone you’ll see two or three worms just underneath, all in the cool and damp. But what is not generally understood is that you can’t have superphosphate and worms. The worms don’t like the superphosphate or any of the chemicals or weed killers and things you put on the crops now, these selective killers. You have to make up your mind whether you’re going to harness the worm or you’re going to work for the chemical merchant.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“It is not the land itself that constitutes the farmer’s wealth, but it is in the constituents of the soil, which serve for the nutrition of plants, that this wealth truly consists.”—Liebig.

Robert Lamb, Conservationist

World Television Day
21 November 2018

As John May says, Robert Lamb [February 7, 1949 – September 12, 2005] was a “conservationist with a warning for the world about deforestation.[8*]” Lamb as editor of Earth Report also contributed to the periodical “Tree News” and “The Generalist”. Robert Lamb worked indefatigably as a tree campaigner, and conservationist and was employed as a government scientific officer in the fields of tropical agronomy, entomology, and integrated management in Gambia, Ghana, Niger, Yemen, and Nigeria.

Robert Lamb wrote a biographical tribute on the 80th birthday of Richard St. Barbe Baker. Whereas, St. Barbe Baker is known for the books he published, as well as his role in establishing the International Tree Foundation [formerly Man of the Trees]. However, Robert Lamb remembered that St. Barbe also helped to initiate the Soil Association and the Forestry Association of Great Britain. Robert Lamb chose his vocation as a forester from hearing the passionate speeches of St. Barbe Baker. The ripple effect that St. Barbe Baker had on the planet resulted in a global awareness of the importance of trees and forests to the survival of our planet.

“His life [Richard St. Barbe Baker’s] proved that it is not enough just to know trees or understand the science of coexisting with them. If we wish to deserve to protect them, we must also love them.” Robert Lamb.

Robert Lamb went on to write the book, “World without trees” Dutch Elm disease and other human errors. Introduction by Anthony Huxley. Publisher: Wildwood House Ltd; First Edition edition (May 17, 1979) ISBN-10: 0704502577 ISBN-13: 978-0704502574, ” Drawing the Line: Earth Report 10″, “Careers in environmental conservation” revised by Robert Lamb. (ISBN)0749415673 (OCoLC)34851079 and Promising the Earth” Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (October 11, 1996) ISBN-10: 0415144434 ISBN-13: 978-0415144438. LAmb followed these publications with a documentary, “Mpino, the Tree that Makes Music” (1992) Other notable documentaries followed; “Fate of the Forest” [1996], “Paper Tiger” and “Blood Timber”. Robert Lamb compiled an extensive filmography of over 220 documentaries. Lamb worked with the World Forest Action [WFA], and Friends of the Earth [FoE]

Forest Film Documentaries
Forest Film Documentaries

In the book “World without trees” Dutch Elm disease and other human errors, Lamb calls attention to the international crisis of worldwide deforestation, and Dutch Elm Disease. The Elm, “as well as being a dominant tree in many rural areas, the elm was also an important urban tree, and once constituted a significant proportion of the tree population in many towns and cities…The Dutch elm disease crisis had a profound impact on how the British public viewed not only their trees, but the wider natural environment. The idea that such a well-loved tree could just disappear from our rural and urban landscapes was difficult for many people to grasp.”

What brought about the mishap of the arboreal disaster, the fungal disease known as Dutch Elm disease? “the major causes being the virulence of the mutant strain of the causal fungus from Canada, its wide specificity [an entire genus], its largely clonal mode of regeneration, and lastly the failure of much-acclaimed phytosanitary measures at the ports. Re-installation of this beautiful and useful genus,  pheromones having disappointed, may, one can hope, depend on a viral success comparable to that of Baculovirus oryctes on the coconut beetle[1]” So was the Dutch Elm disease epidemic caused by the “careless trafficking of timber traders?[1]”

Forest Film Documentaries
Forest Film Documentaries

“Promising the Earth” relates the epic struggles of the Friends of the Earth environmental group, and the unfolding story of green campaigns. Working for the Friends of the Earth has been described as “It’s not another job in another organisation; it’s a cause, and it takes people over, body, mind and soul.[3]**”

“These are times that try men’s souls. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly. Let it be told to the future that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive, the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet and repulse it.” ~Tom Paine

“Mpino, the Tree that Makes Music” (1992) alerted the world to the devastating effects of woodwind instruments, the clarinet and flute, created from the African Blackwood Tree (African Ebony) family Leguminosae, genus Dalbergiav, species melanoxylon. As a result of this documentary, musical concerts raised funds to reforest the African Blackwood Tree. The call to plant special trees and to protect the African Blackwood Tree, was taken up by Debbie Larson, the African Blackwood Conservation Project ABCP and Fauna and Flora International/SoundWood.

Forest Film Documentaries
Forest Film Documentaries


Robert Lamb was a voice for the environment, and spoke up on behalf of forests globally. With creative vision, publishing numerous books, and documentaries, Robert Lamb made a difference networking the devastating effects of deforestation and increasing environmental consciousness internationally.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Edwardson, T.E. World without trees [review] New Scientist 12 July 1979.

2. Jonhston, Mark. Trees in Towns and Cities: A History of British Urban Arboriculture Publisher Windgather Press, 2015 ISBN 1909686638, 9781909686632.

3. **Lamb, Robert. Promising the Earth Routledge, 2012ISBN 1135104638, 9781135104634

4. Robert Lamb. Writer and conservationist. The Times [London]. November 1, 2005

5.Lamb, Robert. The Man of the Trees. The Generalist. October 14, 2005.

6. Robert Lamb Environmentalist who devoted himself to highlighting the destruction of forest habitats for commercial purposes. The Times U.K. November 12, 2005

7. May, John. Robert Lamb: Tree Campaigner, Creative Conservationist The Generalist. October 14, 2005.

8*. May, John. Robert Lamb The Guardian. Oct. 14, 2005. [
John May, a freelance journalist, and editor of “The Generalist” brings forward news and developments as they affect the environment, science, culture and politics.

9.  Robert Lamb. Source Watch.

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Endangered Species

Universal Children’s Day
20 November 2018

“Young People today are deeply concerned about trees and the future of Mankind. They feel these things intensely, and that inspires me with great hope.”Richard St.Barbe Baker.[2]

 

“I have a vision of the earth made green again through the efforts of children planting trees. Children of all ages, of all colour and races, holding hands encircling the earth, working together to bring harmony and peace to all people, to all nations and to our relationship with the natural world.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

During the short period I knew Barbe Baker, I found him a warm and inspiring man full of energy, ideas and hope that the young generation would embrace the concerns of the older generation and would save the planet from environmental disaster. We may not have realized that vision but we continue to be inspired by their commitment.” Wangari Maathai 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner, founder of Kenya’s Green Belt movement.[1]

Children of the Green Earth | Tree Planting SongParchmentChildrenMotto

“If a geographic place rapidly changes in a way that demeans its natural integrity, then children’s early attachment to land is at risk. If children do not attach to the land, they will not reap the psychological and spiritual benefits they can glean from nature, nor will they feel a long-term commitment to the environment, to the place… If we are going to save environmentalism and the environment, we must also save an endangered indicator species: the child in nature.”~Richard Louv

Bibliography

Lamb, Robert. The Man of the Trees. The Generalist. October 14, 2005.

1. “Speaking Out” Two interviews with St. Barbe in which he presented his views on forestry ~ drawn from a wealth of experience which had earned him the title “Man of the Trees” The Ecologist Magazine. October/November 1979. Editor Edward Goldsmith.

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

Rethinking Boundaries

 

“Rethinking Boundaries.

The issues of who owns what, and off site issues such as noise, have a huge impact on the way a site can work as a landscape.  The way in which a site has been defined should be kept in mind when any project starts…Our work, more often than note, is about how people use spaces, how they live in  places, what they do, how they walk, dance, play, and rest.  Designing for people has the added benefit of empowering a proprietary population, people who will not only care about but care for the landscape.”  Ruddick, Margie.  Wild by Design.  Island Press.  Washington. 2016

Neault Road & the Afforestation Areas: The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans. (source and map page 26-27)  What is a rural commercial/industrial area?

“The Rural Commercial/Industrial category accommodates general commercial and industrial uses, including lightly-serviced industrial, storage, and commercial areas that require a large land base. This area shall be differentiated into Rural Commercial and Rural Industrial areas through future planning” Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan May 2017

 George Genereux Urban Regional Park is quarter section is 160 acres or one forth of a square mile which is a very very small amount of land in comparison to the massive number of sections under review and planning currently.(source and map page 26-27)

The land surrounding George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area) as previously mentioned is rural commercial/industrial area and takes up approximately 11 quarter sections of land (See map)- so how will the land planning affect the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area)? (source and map page 26-27)

How will the city of Saskatoon and greater metropolitan area tackle the particular benefits of the George Genereux urban regional park?  How will the George Genereux Urban Regional Park be preserved in perpetuity, as per the 1972 proclamation by the City of Saskatoon during this next phase of expansion?  As the population of the greater metropolitan area designs ever increasing land masses for commercial, industrial, and residential, where sill the quarter section of land afforested end up?

Did you know that trees, forests, and afforestation areas do help protect you from carcinogens!!!!  So in the middle of a rural commercial/industrial area, the George Genereux Urban Regional Park would mitigate harmful emissions which arise from rural industrial activities.  As rural and urban residents the information from long range planning provides a safer and healthier space for everyone to live and reside.  Building our urban forest is an amazing testament to both the city and the P4G planners.

“Our green space is more than just beautiful – it provides an abundance of ecological services. Purifying the air we breathe and the water in which we swim and drink are but a few examples. The cumulative benefits of these life-sustaining services provided by the urban canopy have been valued at more than $80-million annually. Ecological services such as these help to remediate some of the negative health effects brought on by industrial activities and the resulting pollution.  ”
Prevention as the cure: How trees help protect you from carcinogens

Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authority (SREDA).  The P4G meets in the effort to expand the city of Saskatoon, and surrounding environs to  between 273,000 and 301,000 by 2020; 302,000 and 349,000 by 2025; 333,000 and 405,000 by 2030; and between 368,000 and 470,000 by 2035.  (source) As a matter of fact Saskatoon eyes 1M population in 50 years.

“The prescription for this new global market economy is to rob federal governments of all legitimate roles in setting standards, whether for the health of the people or the environment. Deregulation and decentralization become dominant policy since all regulations are viewed as violations of the freedom of the market. Laws protecting wildlife, natural resources like forests, or for that matter, the quality of air, water and soil, or the integrity of biodiversity, are viewed as unacceptable obstacles in the part of the market’s role in mediating all matters. Still another aspect of the new global order is privatization. The private sector is to be trusted to apply the laws of the marketplace to all matters social and environmental. The test for response to toxins in our environment is to measure the harm of continued use against the alleged greater economic harm of a ban, even if the substance is a carcinogen, the benefits being easier to quantify than the harm, when it involves human pain and suffering. ” Knelman, F.H. , Ph.D.  The Sociology of Health The Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine Vol. 11, 3rd Quarter 1996 

 

 

“The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

With spirit we are all children of the cosmos; Without it we are orphaned and adrift.
Deepak Chopra

 

“what we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another” Mahatma Gandhi.

“George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

Where is the “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park in relation to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area?

Map showing the Afforestation Area Formerly Known As George Genereux Urban Regional Park, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, South West Off Leash Recreation Area, SW OLRA and the Afforestation Area All are within City of Saskatoon boundaries as of an annexation of 2005
adapted from the City of Saskatoon Projected Growth Concept Plan map

On any maps showing the city and RM of Corman Park 344, the small square extending west from SK Highway 7 is “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is south of Chappell Yards CNR train station, and north of Township Road 362 A (Cedar Villa Road)  Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is west of the Civic Operations Center (Bus Barns and Snow Dump facility), and east of the Saskatoon Italian Center and Saskatchewan Highway 7.

“George Genereux” Urban Regional Park is directly diagonal across Saskatchewan Highway 7 east.  “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park is a quarter section of afforested land.  Both “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area were purchased by the City of Saskatoon in 1960 and afforested in a 1972 “War Against Ecology Abuse” programme by the City of Saskatoon Parks Department to be used as a tree nursery.  1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before city council that these first  660 acres of afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity and this is approved.  The trees are much too big to transplant now, in 1979, the naming included Urban Regional Park in the title.

Both Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and  “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park  received their respective names  October 19 1978 (proposal to City Council) – October 30, 1978 (vote by city to approve and finalize). The name “George Genereux” was taken for a pocket park in another area of Saskatoon, leaving this urban regional park without a name.

What land development and growth is proposed for the land around George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

Forest Picture: George Genereux Urban Regional Park looking east from CNR Overpass SK Hwy 7
DSCN7452.JPG

“The clearest way into the universe is through a forest wilderness.”  John Muir

Who was George Genereux?

George Genereux (March 1 1935- April 10, 1989) was a seventeen year old high school student in 1952 when he won the Olympic Games Gold Medal for trap-shooting at the Summer Olympc Games held in Helsinki, Finland with 192 out of 200.  This was Canada’s first gold medal at the olympics since 1932.  Further to this honour, Genereux was bestowed the Lou Marsh Trophy for being Canada’s outstanding amateur athlete of the year, making him the youngest person in history to receive this honour.  The City of Saskatoon declared Genereux “Citizen of the Year” in 1952.  Canada honoured him as male athlete of 1952.  Genereux was installed in the Canada Sports Hall of Fame (1955), Saskatchewan  Sports Hall of Fame on October 31 of 1966, inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame 1986 and the Trapshooting Hall of Fame (1986).(Source, Source, Source, Source, Source and City of Saskatoon archives)

Genereux was born to Dr. Arthur Genereux (b1901 Lethbridge AB – March 12, 1975) and Catherine (d 1964).(Source)  At the age of 16, Genereux was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis, which ended his sporting career in trap shooting when he was 20.(Source and Source)

Genereux started training with his father, Dr. A.F. Genereux, and Jimmy Girgulis when he was 12 years old. James “Jim” Girgulis, himself won the Canadian Team Trap Shooting Campionship in 1939 and 1941.  Further, Girgulis, won every trap shooting event held across Western Canada.   Genereux went on to trap shooting events across  Canada and the United States.  At the age of 13 Genereux won the Midwestern International Handicap Honours, then he acquired 3 successive Manitoba – Saskatchewan junior titles. (source) Genereux won the Junior Championship of North America at the Grand American Handicap, held in Vandalia, Ohio in 1951.  During this event, Genereux broke 199 clay pigeons out of 200.  Genereux also placed second in the Oslo, Norway World Championships, 1952.  (Source, Source,  Source and City of Saskatoon archives)

Genereux, attended the University of Saskatchewan to earn his Arts and Sciences degree, then he went on the McGill University to study Medicine graduated 1960.  Dr. George Genereux was for years a Professor of Radiology at the Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon.

The biography submitted to City Council stated that “It is considered appropriate to select in his honour this particular tract of semi-wilderness with its favorable habitat for wildlife of many kinds.”

Genereux is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery along with his mother and father.  Genereux died April 10, 1989.

“At the time of his death he was working with three other internationally known  specialists on the third and fourth volumes of a study of chest diseases. ..Despite his own bad health, Genereux worked to advance the cause of medical knowledge.   If you can’t help yourself, you should use your God-given talents to help others,’ he said in one interview.” Saskatoon Star Phoenix April 11, 1989

The above map shows the relation of the afforestation areas to the West Swale, and its confluence at Yorath Island.  The West Swale, and the deposition of Yorath Island were created from the Pleistocene era “Yorath Island Spillway” event.

What land development and growth is proposed for the land around George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

“Trees exhale for us so that we can inhale them to stay alive. Can we ever forget that? Let us love trees with every breath we take until we perish.” 
― Munia Khan 

When walking in either “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park or the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area they can be seen one from the other by peering under the CNR overpass.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Bibliography:

Sharpshooter George3 Genereux grabs gold – Helsink, 1952 CBC Digital Archives.

George Genereux Canadian Encyclopedia

George Genereux Sports Hall of Fame.

George Genereux Sports Reference Olympic Sports

George Genereux Saskatoon Public Library

James Jim Girgulis Sask Sports Hall of Fame

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

With spirit we are all children of the cosmos; Without it we are orphaned and adrift.
Deepak Chopra

 

“Healing the broken bond between children and nature may seem to be an overwhelming, even impossible task. But we must hold the conviction that the direction of this trend can be changed, or at least slowed. The alternative to holding and acting on that belief is unthinkable for human health and for the natural environment. The environmental attachment theory is a good guiding principle: attachment to land is good for child and land.”  Richard Louv

 

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.