June 9 Tribute

Surely a great tree has fallen.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

Dr Richard St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., Hon. L.L.D. (Sask), F.A.I.L., For, Dip. Cantab. (St. Barbe) 9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982.

Six and Thirty Years have Passed

The World lost a great man

In recognition of St Barbe’s love of trees

Plant a tree in memory.

Contact Trees Canada, the Meewasin Valley Authority or the City of Saskatoon

“Let children walk with Nature, let them see the beautiful blendings and communions of death and life, their joyous inseparable unity, as taught in woods and meadows, plains and mountains and streams of our blessed star, and they will learn that death is stingless indeed, and as beautiful as life.” ~John Muir

Tree Planting Song
Tree Planting Song

“A society grows great when old men plant trees

whose shade they know they shall never sit in”

Children of the Green Earth Motto
Children of the Green Earth Motto

“a great
man
is
gone. Tall as the truth was who; and
wore his
… life
like a …
sky.”
―E. E. Cummings

On June 9, 2011, the British Columbia government renames a portion of the Trans-Canada Highway.  Those driving  between Langley and Abbotsford will be traversing  “The Highway of Heroes.”  The commemoration is to honour 13 BC soldiers who gave the supreme sacrifice in Afghanistan. Victoria, BC.

The Maori of yore revered his natural tree cover, the giant Kauris, pines and Totaras. When a great Maori Chieftain fell in battle, or died, they would say: “Surely a great Totara tree has fallen.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

What tributes and accolades have honoured Richard St. Barbe Baker?  In Saskatoon, the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area  has its dedication ceremony on June 15, 1985.  On the University of Saskatchewan campus, a conference inaugurated the Richard St. Barbe Baker Foundation June 4 and 5 1984.  In 2013, near the site of St. Barbe’s last tree planting [just days before his death], the Meewasin Valley Authority and the Saskatoon Baha’i Community erected a plaque commemorating St. Barbe.

How will you celebrate the memory of Richard St. Barbe Baker?

Will you be as the Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees?  The forest scouts who promised that they would protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area 😉

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Herptology; What is a herptologist?

What a question in the middle of winter, however as spring approaches ~ “Where are the frogs?” is a most excellent query!!!

“Stewards of Saskatchewan” is a voluntary program of the provincial group Nature Saskatchewan.  With this program, volunteer stewards collectively monitor population data on various at risk species.  One of these is the Northern Leopard Frog, (Lithobates pipiens or Rana pipiens) designated as Special Concern in Canada

Please report to the Stewards of Saskatchewan SOS survey, if you sight one of the species on their list.  Did you know that April is Frog month? Celebrate Frog Month with your family!  Find out how to become an amateur herpetologist this April!

Where might be one of the places in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area where  a Northern Leopard Frog could be sighted?

The Chappell Marsh, the permanent wetlands of the West Swale contain water all the time.  But where are the temporary wetlands located?  This is exactly where the frogs are singing their merry songs.  This area for the lands east of  Chappell Marsh in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is marked as a yellow oval on the attached map.  The Northern Leopard Frog, sings just to the west of the southwest off leash recreation area.

FrogMap
Northern Leopard Frog, Rana Pipiens Map

Just as farmers watch the weather; “In dry years, arable agriculture can fail over large parts of the province, whilst in wet years, flooding has caused widespread damage to rural and urban infrastructure.” “(Pomeroy, 2005)

So, too, do the frogs seem to watch the weather.  During dry years such as those experienced 2015, 2016, and 2017 there were no frogs heard at the Richard St. Barbe  Baker Afforestation Area.  However in 2013 and 2014 frogs were a delight to the years, especially as the Northern Leopard Frog is a species of Special Concern.  As the weather cycles in the province, it can be expected that another year of flooding may follow the very dry years experienced 2015, 2016, and 2017.  The newspapers report the flooding damaging crops, basements and highways however the glorious thing which is missed on the years of high water tables, is that the frogs come back!

There are definitely other areas, such as where the old grid road is being swallowed up by Chappell Marsh near the road turn off to Chappell Marsh Conservation Area.  The old grid road is partially submerged, making it the perfect habitat for frogs [and ducks] as well.

Now then, it would be a very intriguing for a herpetologist,  volunteer ‘Steward of Saskatchewan’ or conservation officer to engage in a project to walk with a GPS app which records altitude.  This project would scan the entirety of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and ‘George Genereux’ Urban Regional park for altitude levels similar to the altitude of the meadow west of the South West Off Leash Recreation Area.  Other areas which provide a rich habitat for the Northern Leopard Frog could be identified in this method for the areas west of Chappell Marsh and in ‘George Genereux’ Urban Regional park.  In this way during years of flooding the Northern Leopard Frog could be surveyed and counted in identified Frog zones.  And accordingly in the years of drought, the environment could remain undisturbed awaiting their safe return.  🙂

Perhaps, just perhaps, this would be a way to ensure the Northern Leopard Frog’s survival.  An altitude test may just help to find the temporary wetlands conducive to the frog’s habitat, and could then be protected from development.  Either that, or developers would need wait until years of high water tables before developing land to determine the habitat for frogs.

Saskatchewan cycles through years of drought and high water tables.  The years 2013, and 2014, saw very,  very high rain levels, spring run off and flooding.  Chappell Marsh itself washed out a grid road, and water pumps were allocated to try to divert the flooding away from Saskatchewan Highway 7 west of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and CN Chappell Yards.  The cycle of very wet conditions was also seen historically over the years 2005, and 2006. (Garnet, 2012)

July 13, 2014, Emily Chan reported “In Saskatchewan, it’s estimated that a total of up to 3 million acres, including some farmland, have already flooded.”   “Highways closed and communities declared states of emergency …, ” reports the Canadian Press on June 30, 2014 due to a deluge of rain.

“From too much rain to not enough — and everyone baking in the heat — communities smashed weather records in July across Saskatchewan.”(Climenhaga, 2017)  Whereas, in direct contrast to the years of 2013 and 2014, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada reported that 2016 was the hottest year on record, replacing the record set in 2015. In 2017, “Saskatchewan farmers say drought conditions in some parts of the province are the worst they have seen in decades “(Bridges, 2017)  “Record-breaking temperatures and extremely low rainfalls across Western Canada are causing chaos for farmers and firefighters this summer as they grapple with the worst drought in more than a decade.” {Sikierska, 2015)  Drought also ravaged Saskatchewan over the years 2001 to 2002. (Garnet, 2012)

“Nowhere else  in Canada does the lack or excess of water cause such widespread concern, nor are there many Canadian environments subject to greater seasonal change in precipitation and surface-water storage.”(Pomeroy, 2005)
Drought years have been recorded as 1961, 1967, 1979, 1980, 1985, 1988, 2003, 2009.  Whereas, the flood years are reported  as 1965, 1977, 1986, 1991, 1993, 1999, 2005, 2010.  (Garnet, 2012)
“The trees and vegetation which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are therefore performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. The glorious rich, colourful, quilted covering of vegetation is not there merely to feed and please us. Its presence is essential to Earth as an organism. It is the first condition to Earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the ‘skin of the Earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life. ” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Bibliography

2016 Annual Report of Agroclimate Conditions Across Canada Government of Canada Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

Bridges, Alicia. Sask. farmers say drought conditions worst in decades. Farmers, ranchers face tough season due to hot, dry weather.  CBC News.

Chan, Emily.  Prairie farmers frustrated as flooding drowns crops.  Ctv News.  July 13, 2014

Climenhaga, Christy.   Regina experiences driest July in 130 years. July topped the charts for hot and dry weather in southern Saskatchewan. CBC News.  Aug. 1, 2017

Cross, Brian. Rising waters wash away land, farmers’ futures . The Western Producer. May 7, 2015

Flooding, highway closures as heavy rain pounds Prairies Canadian Press.  June 30, 2014.

Garnett, Ray and Madhav Khandekar.  From Drought to Wet Cycles The Changing Climate of the Canadian Prairies.  May 3, 2012.

Pomeroy, John, Dirk de Boer and Lawrence Martz.  Hydrology and Water Resources of Saskatchewan.  Centre for Hydrology Report #1.  Department of Geography, University of Saskatchewan February 2005.

Reeve warns flood water could flow over Hwy 11 in Lumsden area CBC News.  May 5, 2013

Saskatchewan flooding: 37 communities declare state of emergency CBC News.  June 30 2014

Sask. Flooding >Flood-battered roads crumbling around eastern Sask. Culverts, bridges, train tracks washed out over a wide area CBC News. July 2, 2014

Siekierska, Alicja.  Hot, dry and disastrous. Western Canada’s drought is taking a toll. Edmonton Journal.  July 25, 2015

Top ten weather stories for 2010: Story three. From Dry to Drenched on the Prairies.  Government of Canada.  Environment and Climate Change Canada.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 “We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

St Barbe

Additional information has been uncovered regarding, “St. Barbe” and whether it should be part of the surname, or used as a middle name.

Lt. Dr. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, OBE, ACF, MC, LL.D, F.A.I.L., For. Dip. Cantab.

Commonly he is known as Richard St Barbe Baker, earth healer and conservationist, or affectionately referred to as “St Barbe” by his friends.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

 

The “e” in Barbe is silent as confirmed by the West End Local History Society, where Richard St. Barbe Baker grew up in the country house, “The Firs” on Beacon Road, West End, Hampshire, England.

“Many wonderful days filled Richard St. Barbe Baker’s long life. As an adult he was affectionately called by his middle[sic] name, St. Barbe ~ a French surname that had been in his family for generations. His admirers considered him a ‘saint’ because he whole-heartedly devoted himself to helping the planet. He called himself a conservationist and an “Earth Healer. (Malnor. 2009) ”

Richard St. Barbe Baker was the eldest living child born to Reverend John Thomas Wright Baker and Charlotte Purrott. Baker and Purrott were married in 1886, and it was around this time that John Baker added the St. Barbe family name to his surname. In total, John and Charlotte had six children all christened with the addition of St Barbe in the surname ‘St Barbe Baker’  in honour of a branch of the family connected with the St Barbe’s of Romsey [Westender May June 2017. Volume 10 Number 11].

Arms of St Barbe of Ashington, Somerset and Broadlands, Hampshire and St Barbe baronets: ''Chequy argent and sable'' Modified from commons File:Blason Palamède.svg by User:Chatsam Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Arms of St Barbe of Ashington, Somerset and Broadlands, Hampshire and St Barbe baronets: ”Chequy argent and sable” Wikimedia Commons  3.0

What is known of the St. Barbe family of Romsey and the English country house, Broadlands?

Broadlands English country house, Romsey,Test Valley district of Hampshire, England.
Broadlands English country house, Romsey, Test Valley district of Hampshire, England.

“After the Dissolution of the Monasteries, Broadlands was sold to Sir Francis Fleming in 1547. His granddaughter married Edward St. Barbe, and the manor remained the property of the St. Barbe family for the next 117 years. Sir John St Barbe, 1st Baronet (c. 1655–1723) made many improvements to the manor but died without progeny having bequeathed it to his cousin Humphrey Sydenham of Combe, Dulverton. In the chancel of Ashington Church, Somerset, is a monument of grey and white marble, inscribed:

Here lies Sir John St. Barbe, Bart. possessed of those amiable qualities, which birth, education, travel, greatness of spirit, and goodness of heart, produce. Interred in the same vault lies his second wife Alice Fiennes, aunt to the present Lord Say and Sele. His first was Honour, daughter of Colonel Norton. He died at his seat of Broadlands in Hampshire Sept. 7, 1723, leaving for his only heir and executor Humphrey Sydenham, esq., of Combe in Somersetshire, who ordered this marble to his memory.{Source}”

Furthermore, “The St Barbe Family originated from Normandy. One of its chiefs was an officer in the Army of William the Conqueror. His name is on the Roll of Battle Abbey and he is supposed to have been the Founder of the Family in England.{Source}

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1066 and all that… Gregorie.org.

Broadlands, Romsey

Burke, John and Bernard. St. Barbe of Broadlands. A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England
Publisher Scott, Webster & Geary, 1841

Cave, Edwards and John Nichols. Obituary. Charles St. Barbe, Esq. F.S.A. The Gentleman’s Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year …, Volume 186

Parker J.H. and J.   Descent of the St. Barbe Family.The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review, Volume 209  1860

Legal documents relating to property on the Broadlands estate.

Malnor, Bruce and Carol. Earth Heroes: Champions of the Wilderness. Volume 1 of Earth Heroes Series. Illustrated by Anisa Claire Hovemann. Publisher Dawn Publications. ISBN 158469467X, 9781584694670. 2009.

St. Barbe, Sir John, 1st Bt. [c1655-17230, of Broadlands, Hants. History of Parliament: the HOuse of Commons 1660-1690, ed. B.D. Henning, 1983

Westender July – August 2014 Volume 9 Number 6West End Local History Society

Westender January and February 2017 Volume 10, Number 9 West End Local History Society

Westender May June 2017. Volume 10 Number 11. West End Local History Society.

Westender September and October 2006 Volume 5 Number 7West End Local History Society.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

Richard St. Barbe Baker Homestead

“Man must resuscitate his planet with trees, his heart with faith.

Richard St. Barbe Baker Homestead
DSCN9559

Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker applied for a homestead entry On August 23, 1912. This homestead location is near Beaver Creek.  He was a student Emmanuel college in Saskatoon, and traveled a trail alongside the South Saskatchewan River to attend classes and leave to return home on the homestead. The land had very light soil, practically all sand and very hilly. The following summer, July 5, 1913, St. Barbe gave up his homestead filing an entry of abandonment. St. Barbe release his homestead entry, as his “city occupation prevents my performing required duties.” This homestead land situates in the Rural Municipality of Dundurn No. 314.

“Man must resuscitate his planet with trees, his heart with faith.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

Gaia

“If a man loses one-third of his skin he dies; if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it too dies. If the Earth is a ‘sentient being’, would it not be reasonable to expect that if it loses one-third of its trees and vegetable covering, it will also die?”
Richard St. Barbe Baker

“To view nature as a vast ‘sentient being’ is to see it alive and imbued with a spirit or a soul just as did our ancestors for hundreds of thousands of years. Today we tend to dismiss this view as archaic, crude or rudimentary, but why as Theodore Rozsack wonders, “should it be thought crude or rudimentary to find divinity brightly present in the world where others find only dead matter or an inferior order of being?” writes Edward Goldsmith (8 November 1928 – 21 August 2009)

Edward Goldsmith, was an Anglo-French environmentalist, writer, philosopher.  As a deep ecologist and systems theorist, Goldsmith was an early proponent of the Gaia hypothesis which proposes that living organisms interact with their inorganic surroundings on Earth to form a synergistic and self-regulating, complex system that helps to maintain and perpetuate the conditions for life on the planet.

“The new paradigm may be called a holistic worldview,” Fritjof Capra (born February 1, 1939), physicist and best selling author of The Tao of Physics and Turning Point.  Capra continues, “seeing the world as an integrated whole rather than a dissociated collection of parts. It may also be called an ecological view, if the term ‘ecological’ is used in a much broader and deeper sense than usual. Deep ecological awareness recognizes the fundamental interdependence of all phenomena and the fact that, as individuals and societies, we are all embedded in (and ultimately dependent on) the cyclical processes of nature.”

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s Creation, this beautiful Earth. The ancients believe that the Earth was a sentient being and felt the behavior of mankind upon it. As we have no proof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible people to accept this point of view and behave accordingly.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Do you agree, is the world a vast ‘sentient being’?

 

“I began to see that the survival of primitive people and of the environment were inseparable.  Primitive people were disappearing. So was wildlife. I realised that the root problem was economic development. So I decided to start a paper [Blueprint for Survival] to explore these issues.”  Edward Goldsmith

Further Reading
11 Billion people will share this planet by century’s end. This will change everything.  

Book Review. The Web Of Life by phyicist Fritjof Capra.  Scott London.

Capra, Fritjof. The Web Of Life (excerpt)  Thinking Allowed DVD with Jeffrey Mishlove. You Tube Video.

Cummin, Vivien.  How many people can our planet really support? BBC News. Earth. March 14, 2016

Gaia Hypothesis. Environment and Ecology.

Hanley, Paul. “Eleven” Live Presentation Paul Hanley begins at 4:14 Wilmette Institute You Tube video.

Horton, John and Glen Newey editors.  The Political Theory of John Gray.   Routledge ISBN 1134212631, 9781134212637

Lovelock, James.  Population Reduction “Max 1 billion”
Parkins, Keith. The Way: An Ecological World View – Edward Goldsmith (Themsis Books, 1996) February 2000

Rosling, Hans. Why the world population won’t exceed 11 billion. TGS. org.You Tube video

St. Barbe Baker, Richard. Why I am Vegetarian. 1957 The Happy Cow.

Vyawhare, Malavika. Can the Planet Support 11 Billion People? By the end of this century, that many people may be inhabiting this planet, according to the latest U.N. projections. E&E News.  August 12, 2015

“If in some small way I’ve helped to slow the runaway juggernaut that we’ve created, or make people aware of it, that has to be a good thing,” Edward Goldsmith

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'”
Richard St. Barbe Baker

Is there anything I can do?

 

“What you permit, you promote.
What you allow, you encourage.
What you condone, you own.”

~Michelle Malkin.

 

 

  WordPress has a daily prompt proferring words upon which a story or report may unfold. The Daily prompt for the day this story was written happened to be “permit” which is the segway into the afforestation area, and what is permitted.

Thank you kindly for your visit.  This post has been revised.  Recently a comment came forward “If there is anything I can do, please let me know.

What is it that others can do?  Take action in order that the afforestation areas a/ become a part of municipal reserve and b/ become a part of park space.

This  concept is the first step of progress for the afforestation areas.  The long range planners are formally cognizant of the larger picture, the view that not even any single stakeholder is aware of.  The long range planners can do wonders in their planning, if everything falls into place.  However a puzzle cannot be completed with puzzle pieces missing.

Is there anything I can do?
Is there anything I can do?

That which is missing is the wherewithal that the long range planners require in order to their job with knowledge and good judgement.  Wherewithal; means or supplies for the purpose or need, especially money.

How do the City of Saskatoon long range planners identify social, economic and environmental goals?
The City of Saskatoon sees a projected population of about 344,000 by 2035, and between 406,000 to 496,000 for the Saskatoon census management area. Of this identified growth, the demographics and population statistics are also factored in for the next 20 years. There is understanding about the population diversity youth, young adults, middle-aged, and elderly residents. Growing forward identifies the complexity of issues between diverse interests, and are excited to discuss community expectations, and priorities. {Source}

“Growing in a smart and sustainable way starts with putting people at the centre of planning,” says Randy Grauer, the City’s General Manager of Community Services. “Growth isn’t just about expanding our footprint, it’s about expanding economic, social, cultural and educational opportunities for everyone… when quality of life leads planning, cities become great places to live.”

Long range planners work directly with the community in conjunction with City of Saskatoon staff and City council. Planners are up to date on new developments in other cities, seek guidance from the City of Saskatoon Strategic Action Plan, and are conversant with the bylaws, environmental regulations, and zoning related ordinances. Community values guide the long range planners as they employ a diverse range of professional services hiring consultants where necessary, and seeking advice from City departments such as the urban forestry program, emergency services, finance, recreation and culture, community support, environmental health, public works, infrastructure and transportation for example. Alongside this, long range planners work in partnership with developers, government partners, political representatives, contractors, city council, legal counsel as well community partners for business and neighbourhood development.

How can long range planners negotiate all these various inputs, resolve conflicts, develop and lead successful collaborative processes and procedures? It is indeed complicated, but with knowledge, wisdom, and foresight, long range planners have served the city of Saskatoon well with analysis of inputs, and support in the preparation of studies, plans, and reports. Long range planners implement all these exciting, and emerging viewpoints in a broad framework encompassing the larger picture and bear in mind how the delivery of such a plan will be of a benefit to all as Saskatoon grows, evolves and changes. With teamwork, leadership, and great community stakeholder collaboration the long range planners improve the quality of life for Saskatoon residents.

It’s an amazing and complicated position which champions for the city of Saskatoon;
Continuous Improvement
Asset and Financial Sustainability
Quality of Life
Environmental Leadership
Sustainable Growth
Moving Around
Economic Diversity and Prosperity

Responding to the comment again; “If there is anything I can do, please let me know.”  What is it that others can do?

Assist in the process which enables the

  1. afforestation areas to  become a part of municipal reserve
  2. afforestation areas to become a part of city park space.

It is only with this visualization that the needs of a variety of stakeholders will be met, illegal trespass are mitigated and the long range planners can do their job, and create a city of Saskatoon which is truly amazing.  It is only when the afforestation areas become municipal reserve and a part of city park space that the long range planners have the wherewithal; means or supplies for the purpose or need, especially money to embrace the afforestation areas.

Contact the city of Saskatoon to promote this process;

municipal reserve and park space for the afforestation areas.

“When you grow up you tend to get told that the world is the way it is and your life is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family life, have fun, save a little money. That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it… Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.” Steve Jobs

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side, and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy from my having lived in it. Richard St. Barbe Baker

History of Afforestation

Saskatchewan archives week is February 4-10, 2018. 

The afforestation areas are wetlands, woodlands, green spaces, how does Saskatchewan archives week fit in with an afforestation area?


Images of St. Barbe, credit
University of Saskatchewan,
University Archives & Special Collections,
Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

The Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds are held at the University Archives & Special Collections.  Encompassing boxes and boxes of letters, correspondence, books written by Richard St. Barbe Baker, photographs, it is a treasure trove of documents, history, biography, and lifestyle of the internationally renown silviculturist, St. Barbe.

The city of Saskatoon archivist, Jeffery O’Brien, was invaluable in tracing Richard St. Barbe Baker’s family tree, and finding information about James Scott St Barbe Baker employed at the Engineering Department, City of Saskatoon.

Additionally City archives also found the history of the afforestation tree planting, and naming documentation of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Urban Regional Park, and ‘George Genereux’ urban regional park.

  1. The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has as its namesake, Dr. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., Hon. LL.D. (Sask), F.I.A.L., For.Dip.Cantab., A.C.F. (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) silviculturist, environmental activist, humanitarian and author who founded the International Tree Foundation and Children of the Green Earth.
  2. Whereas ‘George Genereux” urban regional park honours George Patrick Genereux, B.A., MD, CM (March 1, 1935 – April 10, 1989) was a 1952 Summer Olympics Canadian Gold medal-winning trap shooter, recipient of the Lou Marsh Trophy and the Viscount Alexander Trophy, inducted into the Canada, and Saskatchewan and Saskatoon’s Sports Hall of Fame and physician.

Two book manuscripts of Richard St. Barbe Baker and photographs are housed at the University of Regina Dr. John Archer Library.

In the Saskatoon Public Library local history room is the history of the Meewasin Valley Authority formation, and their inaugural management of the afforestation areas.

The local history room staff also knew about Bert Wellman, and Bill Graham, and how they were ecological pioneers starting a green belt around Saskatoon in 1960.  One of the library staff having partaken in the writing of Saskatoon: A History of Photographs by O’Brien, Ruth W. Millar, William P. Delainey . Edition illustrated.  Publisher Coteau Books, 2007.  ISBN 1550503669, 9781550503661.  This book was familiar with Saskatoon’s amazing pioneers who envisioned a green city.

The Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan is home to the homestead application documents of Richard St. Barbe Baker, and his brother, James Scott St. Barbe Baker.

In searching for a pre-1930 land record, it is revealed that Richard St. Barbe Baker applied for the NW quarter section 25 township 34 range 6 west of the third meridian , and James Scott, his brother was on the SW quarter of section 36 township 34 range 6 west of the third meridian.  These homesteads were near the Beaver Creek Conservation Area in the Rural Municipality of Dundurn 314 near the current ‘Baker Road.’

In this way, the history of the Afforestation areas, are, in fact, housed in the various archives of Saskatoon.  The heritage festival of Saskatoon From Many Peoples Strength, Celebrating Diversity, is indeed, a fantastic way to celebrate the history of the afforestation area.

Saskatoon led the way in 1972, as 660 acres of afforestation are definitely pioneers in afforestation and the city residents have reaped a great value from the planting trees for carbon sequestration.

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s Creation, this beautiful Earth. The ancients believe that the Earth was a sentient being and felt the behavior of mankind upon it. As we have no proof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible people to accept this point of view and behave accordingly.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker