Gaia

“If a man loses one-third of his skin he dies; if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it too dies. If the Earth is a ‘sentient being’, would it not be reasonable to expect that if it loses one-third of its trees and vegetable covering, it will also die?”
Richard St. Barbe Baker

“To view nature as a vast ‘sentient being’ is to see it alive and imbued with a spirit or a soul just as did our ancestors for hundreds of thousands of years. Today we tend to dismiss this view as archaic, crude or rudimentary, but why as Theodore Rozsack wonders, “should it be thought crude or rudimentary to find divinity brightly present in the world where others find only dead matter or an inferior order of being?” writes Edward Goldsmith (8 November 1928 – 21 August 2009)

Edward Goldsmith, was an Anglo-French environmentalist, writer, philosopher.  As a deep ecologist and systems theorist, Goldsmith was an early proponent of the Gaia hypothesis which proposes that living organisms interact with their inorganic surroundings on Earth to form a synergistic and self-regulating, complex system that helps to maintain and perpetuate the conditions for life on the planet.

“The new paradigm may be called a holistic worldview,” Fritjof Capra (born February 1, 1939), physicist and best selling author of The Tao of Physics and Turning Point.  Capra continues, “seeing the world as an integrated whole rather than a dissociated collection of parts. It may also be called an ecological view, if the term ‘ecological’ is used in a much broader and deeper sense than usual. Deep ecological awareness recognizes the fundamental interdependence of all phenomena and the fact that, as individuals and societies, we are all embedded in (and ultimately dependent on) the cyclical processes of nature.”

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s Creation, this beautiful Earth. The ancients believe that the Earth was a sentient being and felt the behavior of mankind upon it. As we have no proof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible people to accept this point of view and behave accordingly.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Do you agree, is the world a vast ‘sentient being’?

 

“I began to see that the survival of primitive people and of the environment were inseparable.  Primitive people were disappearing. So was wildlife. I realised that the root problem was economic development. So I decided to start a paper [Blueprint for Survival] to explore these issues.”  Edward Goldsmith

Further Reading
11 Billion people will share this planet by century’s end. This will change everything.  

Book Review. The Web Of Life by phyicist Fritjof Capra.  Scott London.

Capra, Fritjof. The Web Of Life (excerpt) A Thinking Allowe DVD with Jeffrey Mishlove. You Tube Video.

Cummin, Vivien.  How many people can our planet really support? BBC News. Earth. March 14, 2016

Gaia Hypothesis. Environment and Ecology.

Hanley, Paul. “Eleven” Live Presentation Paul Hanley begins at 4:14 Wilmette Institute You Tube video.

Horton, John and Glen Newey editors.  The Political Theory of John Gray.   Routledge ISBN 1134212631, 9781134212637

Lovelock, James.  Population Reduction “Max 1 billion”
Parkins, Keith. The Way: An Ecological World View – Edward Goldsmith (Themsis Books, 1996) February 2000

Rosling, Hans. Why the world population won’t exceed 11 billion. TGS. org.You Tube video

St. Barbe Baker, Richard. Why I am Vegetarian. 1957 The Happy Cow.

Vyawhare, Malavika. Can the Planet Support 11 Billion People? By the end of this century, that many people may be inhabiting this planet, according to the latest U.N. projections. E&E News.  August 12, 2015

“If in some small way I’ve helped to slow the runaway juggernaut that we’ve created, or make people aware of it, that has to be a good thing,” Edward Goldsmith

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'”
Richard St. Barbe Baker

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Is there anything I can do?

 

“What you permit, you promote.
What you allow, you encourage.
What you condone, you own.”

~Michelle Malkin.

 

  WordPress has a daily prompt proferring words upon which a story or report may unfold. The Daily prompt for the day this story was written happened to be “permit” which is the segway into the afforestation area, and what is permitted.

Thank you kindly for your visit.  This post has been revised.  Recently a comment came forward “If there is anything I can do, please let me know.

What is it that others can do?  Take action in order that the afforestation areas a/ become a part of municipal reserve and b/ become a part of park space.

This  concept is the first step of progress for the afforestation areas.  The long range planners are formally cognizant of the larger picture, the view that not even any single stakeholder is aware of.  The long range planners can do wonders in their planning, if everything falls into place.  However a puzzle cannot be completed with puzzle pieces missing.

Is there anything I can do?
Is there anything I can do?

That which is missing is the wherewithal that the long range planners require in order to their job with knowledge and good judgement.  Wherewithal; means or supplies for the purpose or need, especially money.

How do the City of Saskatoon long range planners identify social, economic and environmental goals?
The City of Saskatoon sees a projected population of about 344,000 by 2035, and between 406,000 to 496,000 for the Saskatoon census management area. Of this identified growth, the demographics and population statistics are also factored in for the next 20 years. There is understanding about the population diversity youth, young adults, middle-aged, and elderly residents. Growing forward identifies the complexity of issues between diverse interests, and are excited to discuss community expectations, and priorities. {Source}

“Growing in a smart and sustainable way starts with putting people at the centre of planning,” says Randy Grauer, the City’s General Manager of Community Services. “Growth isn’t just about expanding our footprint, it’s about expanding economic, social, cultural and educational opportunities for everyone… when quality of life leads planning, cities become great places to live.”

Long range planners work directly with the community in conjunction with City of Saskatoon staff and City council. Planners are up to date on new developments in other cities, seek guidance from the City of Saskatoon Strategic Action Plan, and are conversant with the bylaws, environmental regulations, and zoning related ordinances. Community values guide the long range planners as they employ a diverse range of professional services hiring consultants where necessary, and seeking advice from City departments such as the urban forestry program, emergency services, finance, recreation and culture, community support, environmental health, public works, infrastructure and transportation for example. Alongside this, long range planners work in partnership with developers, government partners, political representatives, contractors, city council, legal counsel as well community partners for business and neighbourhood development.

How can long range planners negotiate all these various inputs, resolve conflicts, develop and lead successful collaborative processes and procedures? It is indeed complicated, but with knowledge, wisdom, and foresight, long range planners have served the city of Saskatoon well with analysis of inputs, and support in the preparation of studies, plans, and reports. Long range planners implement all these exciting, and emerging viewpoints in a broad framework encompassing the larger picture and bear in mind how the delivery of such a plan will be of a benefit to all as Saskatoon grows, evolves and changes. With teamwork, leadership, and great community stakeholder collaboration the long range planners improve the quality of life for Saskatoon residents.

It’s an amazing and complicated position which champions for the city of Saskatoon;
Continuous Improvement
Asset and Financial Sustainability
Quality of Life
Environmental Leadership
Sustainable Growth
Moving Around
Economic Diversity and Prosperity

Responding to the comment again; “If there is anything I can do, please let me know.”  What is it that others can do?

Assist in the process which enables the

  1. afforestation areas to  become a part of municipal reserve
  2. afforestation areas to become a part of city park space.

It is only with this visualization that the needs of a variety of stakeholders will be met, illegal trespass are mitigated and the long range planners can do their job, and create a city of Saskatoon which is truly amazing.  It is only when the afforestation areas become municipal reserve and a part of city park space that the long range planners have the wherewithal; means or supplies for the purpose or need, especially money to embrace the afforestation areas.

Contact the city of Saskatoon to promote this process;

municipal reserve and park space for the afforestation areas.

“When you grow up you tend to get told that the world is the way it is and your life is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family life, have fun, save a little money. That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it… Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.” Steve Jobs

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side, and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy from my having lived in it. Richard St. Barbe Baker

History of Afforestation

Saskatchewan archives week is February 4-10, 2018. 

The afforestation areas are wetlands, woodlands, green spaces, how does Saskatchewan archives week fit in with an afforestation area?


Images of St. Barbe, credit
University of Saskatchewan,
University Archives & Special Collections,
Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

The Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds are held at the University Archives & Special Collections.  Encompassing boxes and boxes of letters, correspondence, books written by Richard St. Barbe Baker, photographs, it is a treasure trove of documents, history, biography, and lifestyle of the internationally renown silviculturist, St. Barbe.

The city of Saskatoon archivist, Jeffery O’Brien, was invaluable in tracing Richard St. Barbe Baker’s family tree, and finding information about James Scott St Barbe Baker employed at the Engineering Department, City of Saskatoon.

Additionally City archives also found the history of the afforestation tree planting, and naming documentation of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Urban Regional Park, and ‘George Genereux’ urban regional park.

  1. The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has as its namesake, Dr. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., Hon. LL.D. (Sask), F.I.A.L., For.Dip.Cantab., A.C.F. (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) silviculturist, environmental activist, humanitarian and author who founded the International Tree Foundation and Children of the Green Earth.
  2. Whereas ‘George Genereux” urban regional park honours George Patrick Genereux, B.A., MD, CM (March 1, 1935 – April 10, 1989) was a 1952 Summer Olympics Canadian Gold medal-winning trap shooter, recipient of the Lou Marsh Trophy and the Viscount Alexander Trophy, inducted into the Canada, and Saskatchewan and Saskatoon’s Sports Hall of Fame and physician.

Two book manuscripts of Richard St. Barbe Baker and photographs are housed at the University of Regina Dr. John Archer Library.

In the Saskatoon Public Library local history room is the history of the Meewasin Valley Authority formation, and their inaugural management of the afforestation areas.

The local history room staff also knew about Bert Wellman, and Bill Graham, and how they were ecological pioneers starting a green belt around Saskatoon in 1960.  One of the library staff having partaken in the writing of Saskatoon: A History of Photographs by O’Brien, Ruth W. Millar, William P. Delainey . Edition illustrated.  Publisher Coteau Books, 2007.  ISBN 1550503669, 9781550503661.  This book was familiar with Saskatoon’s amazing pioneers who envisioned a green city.

The Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan is home to the homestead application documents of Richard St. Barbe Baker, and his brother, James Scott St. Barbe Baker.

In searching for a pre-1930 land record, it is revealed that Richard St. Barbe Baker applied for the NW quarter section 25 township 34 range 6 west of the third meridian , and James Scott, his brother was on the SW quarter of section 36 township 34 range 6 west of the third meridian.  These homesteads were near the Beaver Creek Conservation Area in the Rural Municipality of Dundurn 314 near the current ‘Baker Road.’

In this way, the history of the Afforestation areas, are, in fact, housed in the various archives of Saskatoon.  The heritage festival of Saskatoon From Many Peoples Strength, Celebrating Diversity, is indeed, a fantastic way to celebrate the history of the afforestation area.

Saskatoon led the way in 1972, as 660 acres of afforestation are definitely pioneers in afforestation and the city residents have reaped a great value from the planting trees for carbon sequestration.

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s Creation, this beautiful Earth. The ancients believe that the Earth was a sentient being and felt the behavior of mankind upon it. As we have no proof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible people to accept this point of view and behave accordingly.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

A Timeline to 1979

Do you have an inkling of the inscrutable history of the afforestation areas?  The history no longer needs be enigmatic, mysterious, unreadable, inexplicable, unexplainable, incomprehensible, impenetrable, inscrutable, unfathomable, unknowable; opaque, abstruse, arcane, obscure, or cryptic thanks to a bit of a time line.

“Wisdom: Knowledge rightly applied. We assimilate lots of knowledge. Whether or not we do anything with that knowledge is a measure of our wisdom. That implies some change … and change can be difficult.” – Hyrum W. Smith

Geographical Pre-History ~ the Pleistocene Era ~ creation of the Yorath Island Spillway which results in the current “West Swale.”

1883  Temperance Colonization Society under John Neilson Lake, first examined this area in 1882 and found that it would make an excellent location to found their community based on the ideals of the temperance movement.  Nutana settlement is formed which later becomes a neighbourhood of the current City of Saskatoon.

1884 Surveyor’s Map Plan of Township No 36 Range 6 West of the Third Meridian. Dominion Land Office April 25, 1884.

1890 The Qu’Appelle, Long Lake and Saskatchewan Railway (QLSRSC) reached Saskatoon in 1890. [In 1889, QLSRSC railways were leased to the Canadian Pacific Railway and finally taken over by the Canadian Northern Railway in July 1906. At the rail station between the villages of Riversdale and Saskatoon, there was the QLL&SR bridge which was rebuilt in 1905, and again after a train fell through it in March 1914; the CNR rail bridge was demolished in 1965 to make way for the Senator Sid Buckwold Bridge and the Idylwyld Freeway. The first location of the CNR train yards was where the Midtown Plaza shopping centre stands in contemporary down town Saskatoon.]  Note there are both CPR and CNR lines running parallel to each other south west of Saskatoon.

1886.  On September 10th 1886 Xavier  Gaugeon is doing homestead duties upon his military homestead, the eastern half of section 22 Township 36, Range 6 West of the Third meridian has broken 7 acres in 1887, and 25 acres by 1891 and has built a 14 x 16 foot house. The land is home to 7 horses and 16 cattle.  NOTE the southern half of this homestead this would correspond to a middle portion of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area [The 1/2 mile by 1 mile homestead begins 1/2 mile away from western edge and then extends 1/2 mile to the east].  The RSBBAA is defined as those parts of Southern half Section 22 and SW 23 township 36 range 6 west of the third meridian… On contemporary maps,  CNR Chappell Yards takes up the entire northern half of 22 36 6 W3 the CNR rail line bisects this homestead location.

1899. William Kennedy Esq. puts in a homestead application for SW ¼ Section 22 Township 36 Range 6 West of the third meridian on April 28, 1899. As of 1899 Kennedy initially broke 5 acres of land, up a total of 125 acres by 1903. In 1903 ~ 85 acres were crop land. Kennedy owned 2 cattle and three horses with a frame house and log stable. Kennedy requests a land patent certificate on January 25, 1904.  NOTE this a portion of land 1/2 mile by 1/2 mile  extending alongside the extreme  western edge  of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  On contemporary maps it can be seen that the railway line and the current CNR Chappell yards cuts the northern edge of this homestead.

NE 21-36-6 W3 or George Genereux Urban Regional Park had no homestead entry.   The afforestation lands SE section 23-36-6-W3 also had no homestead entry ~ the unnamed afforestation area also commonly referred to as Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area [east and SW OLRA].

1906. In 1906 Saskatoon became a city with a population of 4,500, which included the settlements of Saskatoon, Riversdale, and Nutana.

1915 Sectional Map Department of the Interior Topographical Surveys Branch. Sectional Maps. Portion of Saskatoon Sheet Sectional Map #215.

1917 Scarborough Map excerpt 

1922 A rail The CN junction is located on SE 24-36-6 W3 according to Bill Barry. A branch line runs through Section 23, township 36 Range 6 West of the Third meridian.

1924 Map Rand McNally Map excerpt This map shows the “Old Bone Trail.” This trail was used by ox and red river cart or horse and buggy in the 19th century. The Old Bone Trail came into use when the Buffalo herds no longer roamed the plains in massive numbers, their bones bleaching dry in the sun. Settlers would try to earn a buck or two, and load up their wagons with the bones traversing the “Old Bone Trail” into the nearest rail station where they would be transported to plants which would then convert the bones to fertilizer. The overlay of the old cart trail on the Rand McNally Map shows how the railways followed the old grade of the trails. Later maps would illustrate how highways followed the grade of the rails. Around this time~ the 1920s, trails began to take their leave from history, and pioneers would utilize the trains for passenger and freight transport.

1925 Map Waghorn’s Railway Guide excerpt

1960. A green belt for the city starts with Bert Wellman, Saskatoon Planning Department, who walked around Saskatoon’s perimeter choosing high spots of land for scenic beauty. Together with City Planner Bill Graham they worked on parkways and planted trees for the 1960 Circle Drive Parkway at these sites. A green city is envisioned.

“The Richard St. Barb Baker Afforestation Area was established in 1960 to create a green belt around the city. Trees, which act as habitat for local wildlife, were planted in rows to generate a man-made forest.”(World Web.com)

1966. According to Saskatoon’s Historic Building and Sites, the “railroad lines which dominated the landscape of downtown Saskatoon since 1890 were moved by the Canadian National Railways in 1966 to Chappell Siding west of the city. On a 285-acre site, the CN operates the most modern container, express and passenger services over 40 miles of track.”(Clubb. 1973. Note 124)

The CN Chappell yards are located to the north of the Richard St. Barb Baker Afforestation Area. Precisely the park is located at 52°6’6″N 106°45’19″W north off of Cedar Villa Road.

1972.  Planting in reserved lands purchased in 1960 for a tree belt begins in 1972. “A tree belt as a windbreak and to create a sense of enclosure is suggested along the edges of development for all areas which will not expand in the near future. Such a belt can already be considered along the northern boundary of Westview Heights. In conclusion it can be stated that a seemingly overwhelming demand lies ahead, however, through careful timing, programming and design there should be few difficulties. It should be remembered that the city forefathers reserved beautiful parks along the river, others have developed in Kiwanis Park, the University Grounds and numerous treed and landscaped streets. They did so under adverse conditions with a population of 20,000. They gave the city a reputation as the “City Beautiful” and today’s residents should be willing to uphold their tradition.” (Wellman. 1963. P 18)

“The concrete and asphalt jungle, filthy air, and cold, stark angular outlines devoid of greenery, are the main characteristics of the modern metropolis,” writes Kathy Cronkite in  Green Survival: War against ecology abuse. Three Saskatoon groups organizing main campaign.  Cronkite continues, “Saskatoon’s parks and recreation board has preserved the area of Beaver Creek, Cranberry Flats, and the rifle range as open space to be enjoyed by Saskatoonians in pursuit of passive recreation such as picnics.  It has also ventured into a massive project of planting 200,000 trees for local parks on 800 acres of land south of Diefenbaker Park and south of the CNR station. The Green Survival Program is jointly sponsored in North America by the Canadian Nursery Trades Association and the American Association of Nurserymen.”  NOTE the rifle range is now referred to as Chief Whitecap Park and off leash recreation area.

An original afforestation tree planter recalls, “I am not too sure of the hierarchy at the time, but I believe Dave Scott was the Superintendent of Parks, and the Assistant at the time was a guy from the Netherlands named Alex Ligtermoet. It was his planting project that ultimately led to me getting out of the park and off the outdoor rinks, and onto the tree crew.
“Anyway, and possibly due to his European roots, it was Alex’s vision to create an urban forest on the edge of Saskatoon. I don’t know how the land was acquired, but the areas planted were adjacent to the CNR railway tracks so I assume that the land was part of the railway’s holdings. The trees were saplings that came in crates from the PFRA Nursery at Indian Head, and Alex had selected a variety of drought tolerant species because the sites would not be irrigated. We started on the east side of the river, just west of the Saskatoon Golf and Country Club, and moved to the west side the following spring.

“The planting machine being towed by the tractor in the picture was purchased specifically for this project. I’m having a tough time remembering my co-workers names, but the tractor driver’s name was Bill. We took turns sitting on the seat of the planter. The boxes were loaded with saplings and a bell would ring to tell you it was time to jam another tree into the furrow, which was done at least 200,000 times over those 2 years. As a matter of fact, I know we got extra trees the second year, so the total number of trees planted is quite a bit higher. The area west of Highway 7 was the last to be planted, and was the sketchiest area even back then. There was a hobo (the precursor to the homeless) encampment in a small bluff of natural trees that made us uncomfortable on occasion. Overall, it is one of the things that I take some pride in and I have always enjoyed traveling over the train overpass on Highway 7 to watch my forest grow – that’s probably the best vantage point to view it.”(Newman, 2016).

Alex Ligtermoet,  Assistant Parks Superintendent, in 1972 goes before City Council to have the 660 acres of afforested lands preserved in perpetuity, this was passed by councilors.

1974 “The City of Saskatoon started a unique project for the prairie called Afforestation, or “Man-made Forest.”

“The City Planning Department, in conjunction with the City Parks Division, investigated the possibilities of having an afforestation program aimed at improving the future environment of the city.”

“Initially, future residential areas were examined and the required area for public reserve located, the intention being to plant these future areas of open space so that when the subdivision was developed, there would be mature trees already established …This idea was extended beyond the limits of these future public reserve areas to encompass the remainder of the surrounding land, and in fact, to consider all those lands owned by the City of Saskatoon not presently developed.” (Ligtermoet, 1974)

1976 On June 7, 1976 the Planning and Development Committee prepare the “South Saskatchewan River Corridor Study: Towards a River Edge Authority”. From this an autonomous agency arises upon which both Saskatoon and Corman Park agree to implement the report.

1979 “The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area south of the CNR station is named in honour of Dr. Richard St. Barbe Baker who received an honourary Doctor of Laws from the University of Saskatchewan.  St. Barbe was an internationally known forestry advisor and conservationist who attended the University of Saskatchewan in 1910 and homesteaded near Beaver Creek. The trail marker and dedication were co-sponsored by Meewasin Valley Authority and the Saskatoon Baha’i community.” (White, 2014).

At this same time George Genereux urban regional park received its name honouring Saskatoon resident, George Genereux, the 1952 Olympic Games Gold Medalist at Helsinki, Finland.  The name George Genereux has been assumed by a pocket park elsewhere in Saskatoon, and the title no longer officially designates this afforestation area.

The “West Swale” as described by Golder Associates is a low lying wetlands area which has its confluence at the South Saskatchewan River. The West Swale – its wetlands and surrounding environment does have a congruency with the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Moriyama’s Meewasin Valley Project 100-Year Conceptual Master Plan is submitted by Raymond Moriyama Architects and Planners. Moriyama’s report includes the river valley of the South Saskatchewan River and also rural lands adjacent to the natural drainage systems feeding into the South Saskatchewan River.

The core concept of Moriyama’s plan was that this is indeed a unique land with a unique people, the objective is balance. The Meewasin Valley Authority fundamental values are;
1/ Nature conservancy.
2/ The improvement of water quality and a reduction of pollution
3/ The need for increased education and research opportunities
4/ An enhancement between rural and urban inter-relationships and users.
5/ An improvement of recreational opportunities
6/ The moving forward on cultural aspects in the area.

“The Meewasin Valley Authority (Meewasin) was formed in 1979 to act as an agent of the City, the University, and the Province of Saskatchewan to ensure a healthy and vibrant river valley, with a balance between human use and conservation. The Meewasin Valley Authority Act (MVA Act) establishes the mandate of Meewasin, its powers, and its jurisdiction, and the Conservation Zone.” According to newspaper accounts of the era, though the afforestation area lands are designated as being within the MVA conservation zone, in the case of the afforestation area only a portion of afforestation lands became managed by the MVA.  Not under management by the MVA are those lands inclusive of the Class IV permanent wetlands named “Chappell Marsh”  and an approximate description continues as those lands west of Chappell Marsh in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Also not under MVA management are all lands within the afforestation area formerly known as George Genereux park.  Roughly, the lands which are managed by the MVA are east of “Chappell Marsh” wetlands including the South West off leash recreation area, and the “unnamed afforestation area east of the SW OLRA.  Meewasin‘s mandate can be summarized into three mandate areas: conservation, development, and education.

“The teacher, if indeed wise, does not bid you to enter the house of their wisdom, but leads you to the threshold of your own mind.” – Khalil Gibran

“Spirit is so called from its being the most inscrutable of all things.~Dr Morrison

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Clubb, Sally Potter and William Antony S. Sarjeant. (1973) Saskatoon’s Historic Buildings and Sites. A survey and proposals. Saskatoon, Past , Present and Potential No. 1. Saskatoon Environmental Society.

Cronkite, Kathy. “Green Survival: War against ecology abuse. Three Saskatoon groups organizing main campaign.” Saskatoon Star Phoenix. May 10, 1972

Fung, Ka-iu editor. (1999) Atlas of Saskatchewan Celebrating the Millennium Edition 2000-2005. University of Saskatchewan. ISBN 0-88880-387-7. Pages 129, 136-137, 161-162
Golder Associates. Southwest Sector Plan. (2013)  City of Saskatoon West/Southwest Sector Natural Area Screening Study. Business & Development – Planning – Long Range Plans – Sector Plans.

Ligtermoet, A.L.  Report Afforestation ~ Man Made Forest on the Prairies. City of Saskatoon, January 4, 1974

Meewasin Valley Authority. (2016) Development Plan.
Meewasin Valley Authority. (1991) West Bank South Development Pla. February 5, 1991.
Meewasin Valley Authority. Annual Report (2014-2015) (8Mb)
Meewasin Valley Authority. (1991) West Bank South Development Plan.  February 5,1991.

Newman, Leslee. (2016) Planting the St. Barbe Baker Forest. Quotation from Wayne Buckle, an original tree planter of the afforestation areas who currently resides in Wadin Bay, SK, north of La Ronge

Wellman, Hilbert E. and Henry F. Frolich. (1963) Community Planning Scheme 1963. Henry F. Frolich, Assistant City Planner, and Hilbert E. Wellman, City Planning and Building Director. Page 18.

White, Robert. (2014) “Men of the Trees” Memorial Marker Even on Meewasin Trail .  SOS Elm News. 2014. Date accessed April 18, 2016

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“We are passing through a time of unprecedented destruction of things of the spirit and of the natural order. We have been caught up by personal greed and national competition. The very body of life on this planet is now being threatened by the destruction of earth’s green mantle, the Trees. “~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Walk the Walk

Two issues have recently resurfaced.

    1. Today, January 25 2018, is female blackout from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. It’s a movement to show what the world might be like without women. Your facebook photo should just be a black square so that men wonder where the women are. Pass it only to women. It’s for a project against domestic abuse, It’s no joke. Share it on your facebook page.
    2. A reminder came forward that the Jane’s Walk believes in walkable cities in honour of journalist Jane Jacobs OC OOnt (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006).  Jane’s Walks are one way to get people out into nature, into their cities, and in touch with the people of their community.  And as the Saskatoon Jane’s Walk representative states; Jane’s Walks “support ensuring [that] the Afforestation area remains a walkable safe location for all to enjoy”

Have you walked the afforestation areas?  Have you really walked these urban regional park to be able to discover and respond to the complexities which exist through observation?  Here is a photo album of images photographed since the community volunteer clean ups.   [October 2016 1,500 kilograms (3,300 pounds) ~ July 2016 8,300 kg (18,300 pounds or 9 tons) ~  June 2015 3,300 kilograms (7,275 Pounds) of trash, chesterfields, construction materials with nails, shingles, and tires were removed.] And this is a map [west portion of afforestation area only] exploring the complexities which have been observed since the cleanups.  Who has walked George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

How can the Afforestation areas be a “walkable safe location for all to enjoy”?  And today, January 25, 2018 ~ female black out day, would women feel comfortable walking in the city, in all urban regional parks, and in the afforestation areas?

Walk the walk
AND
Talk the talk

Today, female blackour from 8L00 a.m. to 9/l00 p.m. It's a movement to show what the world might be like without women. Your facebook photo should just be a black square so that men wonder where the women are. Pass it only to women. It's for a project against domestic abuse, It's no joke. Share it.
Female Black Out Day: what the world might be like without women

Very wonderfully, full city addresses have been enabled for all city parks, and for the afforestation areas.  An address very wonderfully aids in the safety process in cities, as addresses enable a call for help to friends or family and to emergency support.

Fires have sprung up in the afforestation area such as in the spring of 2016. Besides fires in the Afforestation areas, in both 2011 and 2016 huge grass fires broke out near the afforestation areas.  The afforestation area is adjacent to the Canadian National Railway ‘CN Chappell Yards.’  A railway yard, is a complex series of railroad tracks for storing, sorting, or loading/unloading, railroad cars and/or locomotives which may carry flammable contents.  The afforestation area is within the City of Saskatoon city limits, adjacent to the neighbourhoods such as Montgomery Place, and also adjacent to the homes of Cedar Villa Estates of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344. Thankfully there are no more tires in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area which may fuel such fires should they become out of control. And of course, the afforestation areas are home to diverse biodiversity, woodlands, wetlands and grassland flora and fauna as well as host to many and several visitors from the city exploring nature on bicycle, walking, or with their dogs.  The visitors include men, women and children.

“Some believe it is only great power that can hold evil in check, but that is not what I have found. It is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay. Small acts of kindness and love.”  J.R.R. Tolkein Gandalf character

“A city street equipped to handle strangers, and to make a safety asset, in itself, our of the presence of strangers, as the streets of successful city neighborhoods always do, must have three main qualities:

First, there must be a clear demarcation between what is public space and what is private space. Public and private spaces cannot ooze into each other as they do typically in suburban settings or in projects.

Second, there must be eyes upon the street, eyes belonging to those we might call the natural proprietors of the street. The buildings on a street equipped to handle strangers and to insure the safety of both residents and strangers, must be oriented to the street. They cannot turn their backs or blank sides on it and leave it blind.

And third, the sidewalk must have users on it fairly continuously, both to add to the number of effective eyes on the street and to induce the people in buildings along the street to watch the sidewalks in sufficient numbers. Nobody enjoys sitting on a stoop or looking out a window at an empty street. Almost nobody does such a thing. Large numbers of people entertain themselves, off and on, by watching street activity.”
― Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities

At the afforestation areas there are no real demarcations of space, except at the South West off leash recreation area and the east side.  What happened in this areas? What was the result?  Illegal trespass has declined to nil.  Illegal activity [i.e. trash in the park] has declined to nil. Woo Hoo!!!!!!! These portions of the afforestation areas are most definitely showing the progress in tune with the philosophy of Jane Jacobs ~ activist best known for her influence on urban studies [city planning] which introduced sociological concepts such as “eyes on the street”.  Nature enthusiasts, dog walkers, bicyclists, photographers are coming out to these areas …. and …. really enjoying it.  There is safety!  This is wonderful progress!

“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”― Jane Jacobs

The question is asked again, would you, lady, gentleman or child, feel safe today, January 25, 2018 ~  female black out day ~ or any day in the City of Saskatoon, in its urban regional parks, and in the Afforestation Areas? It is hoped that the answer to this question is a resounding “yes!”, if not why not?

Observe, Experience, Do Something.

In honour of female blackout day ~  a movement to show what the world might be like without women ~ perhaps a statue should be erected in the City of Saskatoon afforestation areas.

Why?

“I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy from my having lived in it. “Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“The robin flew from his swinging spray of ivy on to the top of the wall and he opened his beak and sang a loud, lovely trill, merely to show off. Nothing in the world is quite as adorably lovely as a robin…” Frances Hodgson Burnett The Secret Garden

The future of the present

It is change, continuing change, inevitable change, that is the dominant factor in society today. No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be. Isaac Asimov

To what do Ellsworth Huntington and Stephen Sargent Visher refer when they expound that “Unity is perhaps the keynote of modern science. This means unity in time, for the present is but the outgrowth of the past, and the future of the present. It means unity of process, for there seems to be no sharp dividing line between organic and inorganic, physical and mental, mental and spiritual. And the unity of modern science means also a growing tendency toward coöperation, so that by working together scientists discover much that would else have remained hid….  Its fundamental principle has been that the present, if rightly understood, affords a full key to the past?” Can it also be said that the fundamental principle is that the present, if rightly understood, affords a full key to the future?

The land for the afforestation areas was purchased by the City of Saskatoon in 1960.  Then the lands were afforested with trees as a tree nursery in 1972 along with fire breaks left in 1972.  These firebreak areas left unplanted resulted in native prairie untouched since 1960.  Additionally  only some of the land was homesteaded before the city purchase, resulting in native grasslands and woodlands left in their native state since before 1960.   Currently, the trees are also too large to be used as transplants so the afforestation areas are no longer considered viable as a tree nursery.

The afforestation areas are quite diverse, being  riparian woodlands wholly situated in the wetlands of the West Swale.  Additionally to the general West Swale wetlands classification there is also a Class IV permanent wetlands creating a huge diversification in flora and fauna including ~ grasslands, woodlands, and wetlands.

So it is quite a mix, indeed of flora, therefore, which host quite a mix in the wildlife one can see while in the afforestation areas.

The afforestation areas, thus described, are located within city limits.  Perhaps it is areas such as these which are invaluable to the City of Saskatoon while the city  is growing to 380,650 by 2035; 500,000 before 2050; with some projections seeing the City reach 1.52M by 2038.  It is areas such as these afforestation areas that make Saskatoon a green city, which was foreseen by the City Planners of 1960.

The afforestation areas were “preserved in perpetuity”  by City Council in 1972 and, furthermore, they were designated in 1979 in honour of Dr. Lt. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., Hon. LL.D. (Sask), F.I.A.L., For.Dip.Cantab., ACF and St Barbe’s vision.

How is that to be interpreted?  That is the question.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

Spirit of place! It is for this we travel, to surprise its subtlety; and where it is a strong and dominant angel, that place, seen once, abides entire in the memory with all its own accidents, its habits, its breath, its name. Alice Meynell

Richard St. Barbe Baker often quoted Henry van Dyke, whom he thought of as the  greatest of tree poets;

“He that planteth a tree is a servant of God;
He provideth a kindness for many generations
And faces that he hath not seen shall bless him.~Henry van Dyke”

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“We are passing through a time of unprecedented destruction of things of the spirit of the natural order.  We have been caught up by personal greed and national competition.  The very body of life on this planet is now being threatened by the destruction of earth’s green mantle, the Trees.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Professor Laurence Roche

“Never before in the history of man has forestry, both in the developed and developing worlds, attracted so much public attention. Environmental degradation and the decline of forests in industrial countries, the continued destruction of forests in developing countries, and evidence of global climate change have all combined to raise the awareness of politicians, planners, and the media to the vital importance of forests in the well-being of nations, and to the knowledge that in our time, the remnants of natural forest ecosystems, with their great diversity of habitats, are in danger of destruction. “~Laurence Roche[7]

plant-in-person-globe-hand

Professor Laurence Roche, B. Agr., M.A., M.F., Ph.D. [October 20, 1927-November 23, 1999] had never met the world renowned silviculturist Richard St. Barbe Baker, however Roche was an avid reader of the books published by Dr. Richard St. Barbe Baker, L.L.D, O.B.E. F.A.I.L., For. Dip. Cantab.,  It was these books, that convinced Laurence Roche to persue a lifetime career in forestry.

Professor Roche born in Wexford, Ireland, had eight siblings. His cousin was the novelist John Banville, and besides devouring works by Baker and novels by Thomas Merton theologian and mystic, Roche was widely read. Considering the same trajectory as Richard St. Barbe Baker, Roche contemplated entering a school of Divinity to become a priest, however Baker’s works inspired Roche to leap feet first, and pursue forestry at Trinity College, Dublin receiving his B.A., B. Agr. [Forestry] in 1960. Roche followed up with a traveling scholarship completing his Masters in Science [1962] and Doctorate from the University of British Columbia [1966].

Roche received postings in both Canada for the Canadian Forest Service and Professor of Forestry and Head, Department of Forestry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Roche embraced a global view following in the footsteps of Richard St. Barbe Baker. Roche advocated that forests were not isolated economic resources for immediate gain. Tropical forests needed to be viewed and assessed in an ecological and social context, and educated African forestry corps to take a lead in safeguarding their forests.

Working alongside John Bene in 1975, they recommended and established programmes on agrisilviculture in developing countries leading to more efficient land use, programmes to improve the lot of rural forest dwellers, by addressing hunger, shelter and degradation of the environment. John Bene, an indefatiguable Canadian forester and inspiring visionary, initiated priorities on tropical forestry research and lead the way to establish the International Centre for Research on Agroforestry (ICRAF) [now known as the Nairobi-based World Agroforestry Centre] in 1977.

“The relationship of populations to their ecosystems is the forest geneticist’s central area of inquiry, and, if he is to gain a fairly complete understanding of these relationships, he must regard the intricate patterns of evolution and coevolution. Therefore, forest genetics engages in ecosystems biology, or, more narrowly, in population biology. ..The environmental conditions that permit a population to survive permanently, and with which this population interacts, today are usually designated as its “ecological niche.” ~Laurence Roche [10]

world-kids-Roche recognized that “almost all tree species studied to date exhibit habitat-correlated, genetically based variation. When the species is distributed over a wide range of environments, variation within a species is often very great. It is this variation, referred to as the genetic resources of the species, which is the basis of evolutionary development, and the starting point for selection and breeding programmes. Such programmes are virtually non-existant for tropical trees. ~ Laurence Roche.[3]”

Following his work with IDRC advisor Bene, to integrate forestry, and agriculture with animal husbandry to optimize tropical forest land use, Roche accepted a position as Professor Department of Forestry and Wood Science, School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, University College of North Wales, Bangor, Gwynedd.

Roche was the founding father of the “Journal of Forest Ecology and Management,” a peer reviewed periodical focusing on the forest ecology interaction with forest management, alongside innovation and research in the fields of biological, ecological and social issues in regards to the management and conservation of natural forests and their biosphere. Forest Ecology and Management is committed to open access bringing forward new ideas and approaches to forest management, and forest ecology.

The spirit and zeal of Professor Roche continued following his retirement. Though settling down in Madaboy, Murroe, Co. Limerick, Ireland, Roche continued to advocate for the tropical forest, making frequent journeys. Roche also provided counsel to the Food and Agricultural Organisation headquartered in Rome. According to Trevor West, Roche was awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre du Mérite Agricole [The Order of Agricultural Merit] in 1991, and was elected an honorary fellow of Trinity College Dublin [TCD] in 1993.

“I had news that an ecological survey was being undertaken in the Sahara, to the North of the Gold Coast, and I learnt that the local tribesmen had been forced by increased desertification to retreat to a small patch of land, the last remaining patch of forest in the area.  There was desert behind them for a thousand miles, and desert to either side of them for a thousand miles, the chiefs had forbidden marriage and the women refused to bear children because the end of the forest was in sight….I was determined that the Kenyans should never have to suffer such an appalling social and ecological disaster.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Forest Ecology and Management  Science to Sustain the World’s Forests Editors-in-Chief: Mark Adams, Dan Binkley, Todd S. Fredericksen, Jean-Paul Laclau, Harri Mäkinen, Cindy E. Prescott, Yowhan Son

2. Major figure in Third World Forestry Sat. Dec. 4, 1999. The Irish Times.

3. Roche, Laurence. Conserving Endangered Tree Species. The Road to Extinction: Problems of Categorizing the Status of Taxa Threatened with Extinction : Proceedings of a Symposium Held by the Species Survival Commission, Madrid, 7 and 9 November 1984
IUCN conservation library International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
Editors Richard Fitter, Maisie Fitter Contributors International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. Species Survival Commission, United Nations Environment Programme  Edition illustrated. Publisher IUCN, 1987. ISBN 2880329299, 9782880329297

4. Roche, Laurence. Neglected value of green city lungs New Scientist. 8 Sep 1977. Vol. 75, No. 1068. ISSN 0262-4079

5. Roche, Laurence. Report on trhree weeks consultancy in Forest Genetics Resources Conservation, Brazil. Consultant Final Report IICA/Embrapa-Procensul II Publisher Bib. Orton IICA / CATIE. JUne 254-July 14, 1987.

6. Roche, L. Gene Resource Conservation International Union of Forestry Research Organisations (IUFRO) Working Party S2.02.2 L. Roche. Head Department of Forestry University of Ibada, Nigeria.

7. Roche, Laurence “The Profession of Forestry Now and in the Year 2000.” The Commonwealth Forestry Review, vol. 71, no. 1, 1992, pp. 13–19. JSTOR, JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/42608498.

8. Roche, Laurence The Professional Forester and the Farmer: One Man’s Experience.” The International Forestry Review, vol. 1, no. 2, 1999, pp. 112–114. JSTOR, JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/42609155.

9. Roche, Laurence The Silvicultural Significance of Geographic Variation in the White Engelmann Spruce Complex in British Columbia
The Forestry Chronicle, 1970, 46(2): 116-125, https://doi.org/10.5558/tfc46116-2

10. Stern, Dr. Klaus and Laurence Roche. Genetics of Forest Ecosystems
Volume 6 of Ecological Studies
Edition illustrated. Publisher Springer Science & Business Media, 2012. ISBN 3642655173, 9783642655173. Page 1 and 3.

11. West, Trevor. Roche, Laurence . Dictionary of Irish Biography. Cambridge University Press.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉