A Problem and Great Dilemna

There is a problem

“If you are seeking creative ideas, go out walking.  Angels whisper to a man when he goes for a walk.” — Raymond Inmon

A great and undeniable problem has arisen. The dilemna which calls calls from the heights of the untrodden immutable forest kingdom. Yet borne up within by courage unflinching, the morning’s faint light through the narrow embrasure, rugged, majestic, the trees, they tower far above.

The June Rose has bloomed as if on cue with calendraic reminder that May has past. Joining June Rose across the vast prairies is Canada Anemone, white and true, and waving as a spring bonnet in the breeze High Hush Cranberry flower doilies toss to and fro. Traveling yet the plains, what could possibly capture the heart more than the delicate bloom of the False Solomon’s Seal and Bunch Berry or, no, it just may be the blossom of the Red Osier Dogwood.

One may then cry out forests are perfect!  However, that leads one to the problem at hand.  In the course of this June study we shall have to touch on what is called the problem of perfection and grandeur. But in this primary matter of the ideal the difficulty is not the problem of magnificence, or perfection, but mayhaps the problem of abundance. Life, thus unfolds and is full of little problems, which arise suddenly and find one wholly unprepared with a solution.

What is that you say? Is it not a wonder to behold the sunset, A gold fringe on the purpling hem of woodlands or mayhaps the sunrise, the fresh-blown rose of dawn, is that not what one should call perfect and spectacular? The reflections of the sky captured in the waters below, amplifying the beauty times two – nay this is perfection! Did you forget perchance, amid the broken clouds the rainbow’s angel spanned? The double rainbow colours bright or light prism dancing amid the crystal dew, what could be more perfect than that? Did you not catch sight of the butterfly flittering past, the Swallowtail and Fritallaries and Mourning Cloaks? Did you stop to listen to listen to the warbling notes from her fair songsters’ feathered throats ~ are these tunes not Perfection at its finest?

You are left free to judge of these problems and dilemnas now with fresh minds to ponder and consider these issues…  And this brings the tale to another problem.  Which is more perfect, the wetlands fresh the new families of ducks, and goslings or the understorey bedecked in blooms, or the marsh spangled with the rays of the Aurora Borealis? How, then is one to choose?   On this particular June day, how will the problem resolve?   Or do your heart strings pull at the sight of a glorious winter’s hoar frost day, the majestic mountain, rippling waterfall, or span of ocean?

“In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks.” — John Muir

Be contented; enjoy your fine imagination; and do not throw your salad out of window, nor shove your cat off your knee, on hearing it said that Shakespeare has a finer, or that a minister is of opinion that you know more of music than of nature.

The exertion of intellectual power, of fancy and imagination affords us greatly more than their enjoyment. We are motes in the midst of generations: we have our sunbeams to circuit and climb. Look at the summits of the trees around us, how they move, and the loftiest the most: nothing is at rest within the compass of our view.

Do not imagine that the illusion is, or can be, or ought to be, complete. Imagination makes encroachments on the heart, and uses it as her own. Imagination could finish the story, this single June Day confronts the senses with the main outline of the whole problem.

“Yesterday was the happiest day of my life. Every new day that follows the previous day is happier and what better than this I can wish for my friend. “I wish you health and strength of an oak, the long life of a redwood.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
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Hiking Boots
Hiking Boots ready for the trail

DEDICATION.I need give my verse no hint as to whom it sings for. The rose, knowing her own right, makes servitors of the light-rays to carry her color. So every line here shall in some sense breathe of thee, and in its very face bear record of her whom, however unworthily, it seeks to serve and honor. ~George Parsons Lathrop

Snowshoes upon the snow
Snowshoes upon the snow ~ days gone by.

How? Recreation in harmony with wildlife.

Is it possible and How?

“Every trail can’t be all things to all people but all trails can play beneficial roles. Trails play roles in the economy, play roles in the environment and perhaps most importantly, play roles in our health.*” Trails have the capacity to provide connectivity, economic benefits, education potential, environmental interpretation, health, heritage, and recreation. Trails can also focus on just interpretive trails. Trails may be made solely for recreation without awareness of the environment. Those people focusing on the lack of Vitamin “N” in the urban population, may construct trails for education and health, and not focus on a wide variety of recreation. Then there are those trails which with planning and foresight have the capacity to combine many features for an audience of skiiers, classrooms of snowshoers, groups of fat bicycle riders, and nature enthusiasts who come to the forest to band birds. Trails invite people and increase the human footprint. Is it at all possible for trails to provide health benefits of recreation and to conserve the footprint of birds and wildlife at the same time?

Trails can be constructed to encircle biospheres, and trails can loop around and create length for an exercise workout. Ecosystems in the afforestation area vary widely. Prairie gives way to permanent class IV wetlands, in turn cycles to Aspen Parkland bluffs, which at the next turn reveals implanted and afforested trees. Native grasslands mix with modified grasslands. Native trees combine with afforested mature tree plantings. Shallow temporary floodplains flow with intermittent streams between marsh areas.

Abandoned roadways in the afforestation area formerly allowed motorized vehicle travel east and west. Newly created trails create greenways through the forest biome itself.

“‘Planning Trails with Wildlife in Mind’ helps trail planners and builders balance the benefits of creating trails with being stewards of nature and wildlife habitat.” How does one make a bicycle path appropriate for a semi-wilderness wildlife habitat? What are some guidelines for being aware of wildlife, aquatic areas, and environmental impacts and consequences? Can trails be designed in the winter months without an awareness of the spring, summer and fall biosphere? How can trails enrich greenways, and the wildlife, while still providing a recreational experience? Are there impacts of trails on the nesting site of deer families, and fawns? What is the view from the bird’s nest with an increase of trail users in a forest?

Is it possible that a greenway concept or trail design, that the flora and fauna of wetlands and woodlands can thrive alongside people in nature? What types of design considerations and awareness of the biodiversity are required? Trail and corridor planning has the capacity to provide ecologically sustainable trails for a city urban footprint. Trails can protect environmental resources, if the natural eco-system is evaluated, and considered.

However, that being said, trails can focus only on recreational aspects, and those benefits. Trails can be indeed fantastic ways to enjoy winter recreation. Once built, the same trails over the spring, summer and fall months, have opened up the wildlife habitat to people. There is no doubt about it, the winter recreation trails don’t disappear along with the snow melt.

Do these trails bring people into the environment with minimal environmental impact? What happens on a winter trail in the summer?  Do the trails provide the tourist with the capacity for educational, scenic or interpretive opportunity year round? Can all vegetation be linked with a greenway corridor, or are there species which do not thrive around a trail? Similarly what species of animals will make homes, reproduce, and live in the same habitat as trails? Can this be accomplished, or does it become an either or? Is it a choice to choose between trails and a variety of fauna, or can they exist together? Do trails include the biosphere of flora and fauna species and therefore enhance the environment?

How do challenging bicycling and hiking trails compare to a shorter interpretive or nature trail? Is the area only large enough for recreational trails, and the park should only be open in the winter, and close up for the other seasons? Can recreational winter trails, afford environmentally friendly trails during other seasons?

Trails dig deep into a woodland, when a trail transects through a forest what are the impacts on the woodland animals, and birds? Do botanists work alongside trail planners to know which areas are sensitive and which would thrive with trails?

Trails are amazing things, a well-designed trail has minimal devastation to the vegetation, are easy to hike, bicycle, ski and snowshoe.  However it may possibly be that protecting the vegetation, is not the sole responsibility when trail planning when providing a minimum impact onto an eco-system. Again, trails are truly amazing things, providing people with an opportunity to bicycle in nature, hike, showshoe, ski, or band birds. Alongside the vegetation, good trail planning will consider the seasons and the urban footprint all year round. If a winter ski trail is created in one area of a biome, will this impact where a deer gives birth to a fawn in the spring? When a winter trail loops through a forest, will that have a ripple effect on species of birds nesting over the summer?

Eco-tourism is wonderful. A healthy and active outdoor lifestyle is absolutely marvelous. Having the capacity to celebrate a semi-wilderness habitat in the city is remarkable. What is the way to make these concepts mutally inclusive? How can winter trail networks live in harmony with semi-wilderness wildlife habitats? This question begs the need to know what wildlife habitats exist, which species live where. Where do the nature enthusiasts band their birds? Where do the deers nest their fawns? If these questions are answered, the biosphere, is truly enhanced with trails, and the next generation of skiiers, snowshoers, hikers, and bicyclers will also be handed a glimpse of a deer, and the grandchildren of the bird-banders, will also be able to band birds alongside the same trails.  Wouldn’t that be fantastic if many generations of recreational enthusiasts, could have a grand time celebrating winter, and that their great grandchildren may also see a deer in a city forest?  Is it possible and how can it be accomplished? The question now is how?

BIBLIOGRAPHY
* Benefits of Trails Hike Ontario.

Trails, Bike and Hike: Inpsiring a Healthy Environment Upper Thams River Conservation Authority. Parks Recreation and Natural Areas.

National Trails Training Partnership Wildlife and environment impacts and benefits of Trails and Greenways.

Benefits of Trails | Rails to Trails

Enhancing the Environment with Trails and Greenways. Rails to Trails Conservancy.

Trails in Saskatchewan Provincial Parks

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
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Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

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Forest Concerns

“Being patient even in the thickest of storms can be the one device that may catapult you over any obstacle.” ~Noelle Scaggs

Phil Tank of the Saskatoon Star Phoenix wrote an article “Concerns raised with police over southwest Saskatoon woodland and “Friend of the Forest April 19, 2017,

An excerpt from the Star Phoenix report, “The city and concerned residents pooled resources to erect barriers on the east side of the area last fall, but were prevented from doing the same on the west side due to wet weather, Adamson said, adding the barriers appear to have done some good.

“The problems went away for all intents and purposes on the east side,” she said.

Ward 2 Coun. Hilary Gough attended the March 29 meeting and calls residents’ efforts to protect the area and raise awareness “spectacular.”

Three cleanup efforts over the last two years collected about 13,100 kilograms of trash from the site, including 85 tires, Adamson said. Evidence suggests it’s not just lone residents dumping small loads, but construction contractors trying to avoid landfill fees, she said.”

The energy of gratitude catapults us into the most profound experiences imaginable.
James F. Twyman


Example Images      After clean up                 Before clean up

Which is better?

For more information:
You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
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Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

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If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
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 “To find the universal elements enough; to find the air and the water exhilarating; to be refreshed by a morning walk or an evening saunter… to be thrilled by the stars at night; to be elated over a bird’s nest or a wildflower in spring — these are some of the rewards of the simple life.”― John Burroughs

Unmoored by the Wind?

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Yellow-headed Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus)
Yellow-headed Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus)

“Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.” —Albert Einstein

The Yellow-headed Blackbird is amazingly sure of foot, even when perched upon swaying cattails. Though they appear delicately perched upon the the heads of the cattail, which disintegrate into a cottony fluff from which the seeds disperse by wind, the yellow-headed Blackbird, stays his post, and is not unmoored.

“Let us heal the naked scars in the earth and restore her green mantle. Let us set our Earth family in order”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:
You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

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Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Canadian Tire, Thank you!

As we come up to UN World Environment Day on June 5, it is with great appreciation and gratitude that Canadian Tire, Confederation Branch has lent a helping hand. Though we had close to 80 volunteers at the “Clean Green Community Scene” for the July 9, 2016 clean up, and 86 tires were found, removed and recycled.  The clean up was held in the summer when the grass was deep and there were a few additional tires thrown away in the bush were missed. The actions of Canadian Tire are very much appreciated in accepting those tires with rims discarded illegally in the bush, so that a beautiful and healthy forest and wildlife habitat corridor can be enjoyed now, and can be passed on to future generations. It is actions such as these, that do, indeed change the world.

When scrap tires are thrown away in the bush, they pose a real threat to the environment and to human health. Tires, left in the elements collect water. The standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Piles of tires can harbour rats and vermin. Accidental grass fires, which catch onto tires, are very difficult to extinguish as tires, themselves are a fuel source. If tires do catch fire they produce toxins and carcinogens such as benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, butadiene, styrene, dioxins, and furans as well as heavy smoke. A combustible tire also increases the threat of a grass fire escalating into a forest fire. If this wasn’t bad enough, scrap tires also post environmental concerns as the rubber decomposes, polluting the water, air and soil. Tires contain oils, heavy metals and lead which leech into the soil and into the ground water. The marshlands, and wetlands of the West Swale are impacted, as are any animals which may imbibe of the polluted water. Now then, not only for these reasons, but who looks at a magnificent forest and says of the scenic beauty, that a tire would be visually appealing in this green landscape?

So, the legacy pollution, of unknown folks who dumped the scrap tires illegally in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has been remedied and alleviated by the Canadian Tire Automotive Department. This is truly and gratefully appreciated by the many and several environmental, recreational and community groups who are involved with the care and stewardship of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. When tires are taken in for recycling, they may be re-purposed as insulation blocks, drainage aggregate, playground surfacing, rubber modified asphalt, floor and truck mats, belts, gaskets, soles for shoes, rubber washers or garden edging.

The next time you are at Canadian Tire Confederation, thank this leading business for standing beside the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. When voices such as Canadian Tire take stand for the environment, it truly does have far-reaching ripple effects. Protecting our environment, human health and the community is a wonderful support, and we have no qualms saying that we are truly grateful to Canadian Tire for your assistance in helping to recycle these tires, and care for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and its semi-wilderness wildlife habitat.

Canadian Tire
Located in: Confederation Mall
Address: 300 Confederation Dr #1, Saskatoon, SK S7L 4R6
Phone: (306) 384-1212
Province: Saskatchewan

Help us tell Canadian Tire how they did today! It was phenomenal!!!

We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations. – Richard St. Barbe Baker.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Bloch, Michael. Tires, recycling and our planet. Green Living Tips. March 17, 2013

Bylaw No. 5713. the “Anti-Dumping Bylaw.”
Bylaw No. 8310 The Waste Bylaw The City of Saskatoon. 2004. Codified to Bylaw No. 9410 Dec. 12, 2016

Keeping your neighbourhood clean What you need to know. The Waste Bylaw no 8310. City of Saskatoon Residential Bylaw brochure.

Tire recycling. Wikipedia.

For more information:

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

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If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
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For more information on keeping Saskatoon green, you may call the City of Saskatoon “Solid Waste Information Line” (306) 975-2486. If you think there is a problem with waste in the city, please also call the City of Saskatoon Trash Tips hot line at (306) 975-2486.

Any person who dumps or disposes of Waste contrary to Bylaw 5713, “The Waste Dumping” bylaw is liable to a fine of not less than $100.00, nor more than $500.00. Additionally, the person charged is responsible for the removal of the waste dumped improperly.

“You can come across a precipice not only in the mountains but in everywhere! ….When you come across a precipice, look for the bridge; it is somewhere there!” ― Mehmet Murat ildan In this case, the bridge for the precipice at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, in recycling tires, came in the form of Canadian Tire, providing a bridge to recycle the tires safely protecting the environment. Thank you!

Water Safety

Saskatchewan drownings


The Aug. 15, 1933 newspaper covered the story; Three city children drown in river. “Young girls die trying to save 6-year old boy. Janet Derkson, 14, Rita Hope, 10 and brother Jimmy, lose lives at Sutherland Beach; Raymond Gracewood attempts rescue.” The three children three children from two families were residents who lived in the old University Heights area (south of the CPR, in what is now Innovation Place) according to Jeff O’Brien at City archives.
The children were very used to the route, having walked on the shore trails with the father of Reta and Jimmy Hope quite often. At this time, the youth went out on their own, and went into the river water at a different location. The youngest, Jimmy was caught up in a pothole from which he could not get out. His sister, Reta went to his rescue, and was also trapped. Hearing their calls, Raymond Gracewood swam out and grabbed hold of both children. Jimmy and Reta spied Janet Derkson, also coming to help them out, and pulled away from Raymond’s grasp to reach out to Janet. Though Janet tried her best to swim out to them, she sank. This happened during the summer months, Janet Derkson was to start grade 6 that fall, Reta Hope to begin grade 5, her little brother was to start school in September.

Though all the children were originally buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in an unmarked pauper’s grave. There was a huge public outcry, upon which the city donated a regular plot and the Rotary Club purchased a headstone. The family held a vigil a few years ago, and re-dedicated the memorial.

In June of 2001, another tragedy took the life of a six year old boy who fell into the cold spring waters off the Victoria Park river dock. June 2016, saw two eight year old boys narrowly escape tragedy. The mother of one of the lads, jumped in to his rescue, and downstream, a fisherman, swam out to the rescue of the other carried away by the river.

Traveling to this year, the Saskatoon Services Fire Department were called out 13 times for rescues at the South Saskatchewan River, impressing the need to be careful around the river in both winter and summer seasons.

Though the fatalities mentioned here were children, the majority of drownings in Saskatchewan were aged 20-24 and those between 70-74. 13% of our young adult population aged 20-24 have fallen to tragic ends drowning, which works out to about 3.5 young adults out of 100,000. Water bodies such as lakes, rivers and streams take the largest numbers of victims. Young children loose their lives most commonly in pools, and bathtubs. Though lives are lost all year around, most drownings occur June July and August partaking in swimming, fishing, water activities, boating or snowmobiling.

Bylaw No. 4433 is a “bylaw of The City of Saskatoon to prohibit swimming in the South Saskatchewan River and to require water skiers to wear life jackets.” The South Saskatchewan River is subject to a strong current, fluctuating water levels, and shifting sand bars. Though there is no bylaw against wading the shallow waters of the shoreline, it is very important to be aware the river is cut by deep, fast flowing channels. These channels can readily be seen only from the high river banks with a clear sight to the river waters. Therefore, wading in the river and getting into deep waters, the same dangers will be present as for swimmers. Sandbars, provide a false sense of security, as the swiftly flowing waters can create unstable shoreline edges of the sandbar creating risk.

An ambulance paramedic stated that, “The banks become very unstable when we have lots of water moving through. All you need is for that undercurrent to grab hold of the bank, and …down your’e going to go, into the river…and that may not be a very pleasant situation for anybody.”

Lifeline states that “it is a misconception that you’re safe if you’re larger than a body of water. You can drown in just a couple of inches of water.” “Most drownings are preventable.”

Whenever you, your family, your pet are taking in the water, take care, and be cautious of the South Saskatchewan River. Saskatchewan, the provincial title honours the Cree word kisiskâciwan, describing the “fast-flowing” Saskatchewan River or the “Swift Current” of the river. Around  wetlands, or any depth of water, be cautious.

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
6 year old boy drowns while playing near river. Cobalt daily Nugget. June 4, 2001.

Hill, Andrea. Saskatchewan father drowns after saving 10-year-old son from sinking truck. National Post. July 15, 2014.

Saskatoon police say no crackdown on swimming in river. Swimming the South Saskatchewan is dangerous, officials say. CBC news June 9, 2015.

Saskatchewan communites brace for more flooding. CTV news.

Sask Drowning Report

South Saskatchewan River Jordon Cooper.

They recognize that while knowledge about nature is vital; passion is the long-distance fuel for the struggle to save what is left of our natural heritage and ~ through an emerging green urbanism ~ to reconstitute lost land and water. Passion does not arrive on videotape or on a CD; passion is personal. Passion is lifted from the earth itself by the muddy hands of the young; it travels along grass-stained sleeves to the heart. If we are going to save environmentalism and the environment, we must also save an endangered indicator species: the child in nature. Louv. 2005. p. 158

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

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Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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Saskatoon City Police Support

One of the deep secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others.Lewis Carroll

In a nutshell, Stewards and Stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area seeking to get the appropriate services to direct and educate the public to be respectful of the diverse flora and fauna of woodlands, grasslands and wetlands – the afforestation area preserved in perpetuity.

It is very easy to enjoy a semi-wilderness wildlife habitat nestled in a mixed deciduous and evergreen forest such as usually only seen north of the provincial treeline. Here in our native and modified Aspen Parkland eco-system, and West Swale wetlands it is better if all users had an awareness and respect for the environment around them.

Quote by John L. Lonergan “Education not punishment is the solution. Education has a huge role to play to change things… Anybody that goes out and wrongs or damages another human being deserves to be punished. …You cannot allow people to go out and damage other people and injure other people or to rob from other people or to destroy other people’s property. That is not the point… The point is that once we look at the population and at the evidence; are there ways to reduce the number of people committing crime and if we can say yes to that we’ll automatically reduce the numbers of victims and it is far better to prevent people becoming victims of criminality rather than responding to it which we do. ” John L. Lonergan TedX Dublin. Sept 2014

Several points follow; put forward by Jeff Hehn, Ambassador of the Fatlanders Fatbike Brigade and the various stewards / stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

1) It is greatly appreciated the assistance being afforded by Air Support One and a request is humbly submitted for continued support until barriers are in place.

2) Better signage, awareness and education will allow police to act when called upon and hopefully less need for action. A defined knowledge of city land / park / open space / environmental bylaws or regulations which are extant if afforestation areas are owned by a/ land branch b/ parks department.

3) Response protocol is defined and understood – police know where to respond and how to get in (particularly if locked) To put into place education that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is totally owned by the city and totally annexed in 2005 along with afforestation area formerly named George Genereux Urban Regional Park

4) An education or neighbourhood watch program implemented addressing safety for users of the afforestation area who personally step up as citizens in regards to protective services needs.

5) Agreement from the Police Commission and letter of support that better signage and vehicles restrictions to the area are necessary and will reduce resources needed to enforce the bylaws and thereby save the city money. Agreement from police board that restricting access will reduce the need to have go out there – costs less to fix problem at the root than to try and deal with symptoms.

The users of the afforestation areas realize this is not solved by the police alone. Education is the key, education at the citizen level to increase awareness of the afforestation area preserved in perpetuity, education for all users to respect the flora and fauna of the eco-system, education in the form of signage and education in the form of vehicle restrictions to mitigate illegal trespass.

With education, everyone’s role at the afforestation area becomes easier. A safe, vibrant and active community life abounds, the environment benefits, time and money can be much better spent.

“I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life. I will play no part in this devastation of this land. I am destined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and of the generations of tomorrow.Let TAWAMHWE-pull together-be our motto ” Richard St. Barbe Baker”

The Board of Police Commissioners has forwarded comments to the Standing Policy Committee on Planning, Development and Community Services Department following consideration of your presentation dated April 20, 2017, to the Board regarding the above matter. The resolution from the Board, along with a copy of your presentation, will be considered by the Standing Policy Committee on Planning, Development and Community Services Department:

DATE: Monday, May 1, 2017

TIME: 9:00 a.m.

The present is full of opportunity. Never before in the history of the planet has mankind been given the privileges and opportunities that are at his disposal today. A great light has been raised and is penetrating the darkness of the world, but alas, too many with dust blinded eyes have yet to catch the vision. Some of us have . That is our privilege and our responsibility.
The fate of an individual or a nation will always be determined by the degree of his or its harmony with the forces and laws of Nature and the universe. Man is not alone in the universe but is surrounded by sources of power, harmony and knowledge.  The fullness of life depends upon man’s harmony with the totality of the natural cosmic laws. Our individual evolution is a job that has to be carried on day by day by each individual himself. It is a lifelong task.”Richard St. Barbe Baker

South West Sector Afforestation Addresses:
1/ Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (City of Saskatoon Urban Regional Park) Parts Section 22 and SW 23 township 36 range 6 west of the third meridian. (East of the CN overpass on SK Highway 7) SE 22 & SW 23-36-6 W3 under MVA conservation management.

2/ Un-named City of Saskatoon Afforestation Area. Part south of CN Chappell yards SE section 23-36-6-W3 preserved as afforestation area in perpetuity, under MVA conservation management- west of SW OLRA and east of COC.

3/ In 1960, part of NE 21-36-6 W3 (West of the CN overpass on SK Highway 7) was purchased by the City, planted in 1972, preserved as an afforestation area. Named in 1978-1979 George Genereux Park (Urban Regional Park), this namesake was removed at this afforestation area for use at a different city pocket park.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker
Pinterest richardstbarbeb

“From water and earth we came, and the future of mankind on this planet will be determined by respectful or disrespectful treatment of these basic elements.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker