The Single Most Important Thing You Need To Know About Forest Restoration

What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.

Chris Maser

Before and After photos

#GenerationRestoration United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

The shelter roof was coming down and actually a log had rolled off of it the day before the restoration event occurred, so *whew* it was a lucky coincidence that this event took place as there are classrooms of children and families also with children using the forest at the moment who may be curious about structures such as these. Sorry we did not take a picture of the sagging roof before the event started. At the end of the event these were the volunteers remaining (There were those who left early before the photos were taken.)

A huge thank you goes out to the volunteers who came out to help with making the forest safer for users of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Also another thank you goes out to these volunteers who assisted to make the forest safer for the elm trees growing near this structure. With the Elms facing two natural threats -Dutch Elm Disease and the Elm ZigZag Sawfly both devastating for Elm trees- it is dangerous for people to also be a threat to the elms of the afforestation area. There are indeed wrong seasons, and methods for pruning, or taking down elm trees lest Dutch Elm Disease enter into the Forest.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.

Margaret Mead

The volunteers who came out for this restoration event on Arbor Week, did indeed become forest guardians as advocated by Richard St. Barbe Baker to take care of trees everywhere! These citizens also took an active role on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal SDG 15 Life On Land and helped to stop the degradation of forests.

The restoration work did involve the taking down of a lean-to tied to existing trees in the middle of a forest area with endangered species at risk in the forest. This restoration will also encourage forest users to stay on trails, enhancing forest guardianship of the woodlands.

1/ Cutting down trees in an area high with Elm invites Dutch Elm Disease if the tree cutter(s) is not properly trained on tree removal (and it is an afforestation area preserved in perpetuity)

2/ Shelters invite homeless people who live off the grid who are not a good mix for the current influx of family and school groups utilizing the afforestation areas as legitimate users.

3/ Shelters are suggestive that people should camp over night, or possibly have a fire detrimental to legitimate users and stewards of the forest, classrooms, and children of families, the neighbouring residents and the CNR Chappell yards oil and gas trains

5/ The Shelter is not built to code, and could be a safety hazard for families or classrooms of youngsters frequenting the trails on the east side of RSBBAA

6/ People are encouraged to go off the FFTB trails to build, enlarge, explore the shelter, and squish the species at risk on the east side of RSBBAA

7/ People who do not identify tree species well, could not only utilize the elm in their shelter construction, but also the tree species at risk in the east side of RSBBAA

8/ The shelter is not made with dead fall. The shelter is encouraging the wanton felling of trees without permissions from the City of Saskaton [CoS] and without abiding by the CoS Tree policy. Felling of trees without proper arboreal certificates of training is also a very dangerous activity as the east side of RSBBAA is becoming more populated with trail users.

9/ Making the east side of RSBBAA safer is a good thing, and also encourages safe trail use just in time for International Trails Day on June 5

10/ Taking care of trees during Saskatoon’s First ever Arbor Week shows citizen commitment to forest and tree health. It is not enough to plant trees, Richard St. Barbe Baker advocated that trees need to be protected also.

11/ People illegally felling CoS trees in an afforestation preserved in perpetuity threatens the trails, the users, and the forest integrity as a safe greenspace.

12/ Restore the afforestation area just in time for World Environment Day on June 5.

14/ Become a member of #generationrestoration, and honour the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

14/ Take action on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal SDG 15, Life On Land You can help stop the degradation of forests.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

The environment is where we all meet; where we all have a mutual interest; it is the one thing all of us share.

Lady Bird Johnson

June 5 Clean up

Help celebrate World Environment Day and International Trails Day during Arbor Week! Make a difference
George Genereux Park Clean Up PAMPHLET Poster
Celebrate World Environment Day, help restore the ecosystem for forest trails, help restore George Genereux Urban Regional Park for everyone to enjoy

Event Timing: June 5 2021 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Event Address: George Genereux Urban Regional Park in Saskatoon GPS 52.1086103,-106.7926227
Contact us at (306) 380 5368 or friendsafforestation@gmail.com
become a part of #restorationgeneration

For more information Google Forms
and thank you for registering
Eventbrite

NOTE: The following changes will be made to the province of Saskatchewan public health orders during Step One of the Re-Opening Roadmap just in time for this Clean Green Community Scene!
Limit of 150 people at public outdoor gatherings; and 
Current province-wide masking mandate remains in place.

George Genereux Park Clean Up. Celebrate World Environment Day, help restore the ecosystem for forest trails, help restore George Genereux Urban Regional Park for everyone to enjoy

Event Timing: June 5 2021 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Event Address: George Genereux Urban Regional Park in Saskatoon GPS 52.1086103,-106.7926227
Contact us at (306) 380 5368 or friendsafforestation@gmail.com*

*Description of Clean Green Community Scene and Directions

As part of the Great Canadian Shoreline Clean up, Arbor Week, World Environment Day, and International Trails Day please come out and help restore the George Genereux forest to enjoy. It is a unique habitat with a willows ecosystem, amur maples for deep red autumnal walks, and trembling aspen stands in a mixed woodland with spruce and pine. The George Genereux Urban Regional Park is about ½ mile by ½ mile in size 147.8acres – Lots of room to socially distance – located on part of NE 21-36-6 W of the third meridian (west of the SkHwy 7) at GPS 52.1086103,-106.7926227.

This is an initiative of SOS Trees Coalition Inc. Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc., Meewasin, City of Saskatoon, the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup and Tim Horton’s Pitch In Week.

Directions: Arrive at George Genereux Urban Regional via the Pike Lake Highway, Saskatchewan Highway 7. The greenspace is to the south of Blairmore Shopping malls, and south of the 11th Street compost, take the first right after wetlands and then a quick left.

It is wise to come dressed for the weather – a hat, closed toe footwear, sunscreen, bug spray & water bottle, canvas gloves, masks. We supply refreshments (i.e. water bottles, juice boxes, granola bars). There will be on-site free facemasks, sanitizer, plastic gloves & trash bags.

Thank you

Name *

Are you with an organization? *Do you want more information about 1/ SOS Trees Inc. or 2/ Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. or the afforestation areas in Saskatoon? George Genereux Urban Regional Park Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

There are small items and some larger items. What can you bring? *Wheelbarrow, 2 or four wheel dolly, skid steer, or bob cat, wagon

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

“The continuing challenge of restoration. …”reconstruction,” ”restocking,” and “rebuilding,” of “doctoring sick land.”…Habitat restoration is both desirable and feasible.
-Aldo Leopold ed. Joy B. Zedler Author

CTV news broadcast online

CTV Newscast and article from Tuesday August 28, 2018 is now online (6:00pm version)

“A City spokesperson said it’s working with the RM of Corman Park and are hoping to have vehicle barriers in place by the fall.”~Saron Fanel, Video Journalist

Many, many people are becoming aware of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and this above announcement is one of the many reasons why City of Saskatoon and Corman Park residents are proud of their civic officials!

40th Anniversary Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area 1978-2018
40th Anniversary Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area 1978-2018

Richard St. Barbe Baker, himself, can now be truly proud of the leadership shown to install vehicle barriers at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area to protect the forest and urban regional park.  This urban regional park will  be a park everyone can be proud of when motorized vehicles can no longer illegally trespass and violate city of Saskatoon bylaws.  The users of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area are excited about the future of this area which will be made safe with the installation of vehicle restriction barriers.  The City of Saskatoon in conjunction with the Rural Municipality of Corman Park do indeed show their commitment to integrity and responsibility.  Administration officials from the city and RM have found a way to come together to think outside the box, engage their creativity and meet the challenge of erecting vehicle restriction barriers.  Great Kudos and hats off to them!

Saskatoon is a wonderful place,  and a world class city.  The city of Saskatoon in mutual cooperation with the RM of Corman Park have shown their commitment to their citizens, and it is truly rewarding that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area will indeed emerge as one of the safest urban regional parks for all to enjoy.  As a growing city, expected to reach one million within 50 years, it is truly inspiring that the City of Saskatoon, and the RM of Corman Park have found a way to transform this urban regional park into a safe haven, and surely, the best is yet to come!

Thank you to the civic officials of the City of Saskatoon and the RM of Corman Park 344
Thank you to the civic officials of the City of Saskatoon and the RM of Corman Park 344

Civic officials operated with fairness, integrity, openness, honesty, and respect for the residents of Saskatoon and surrounding area with this announcement.  It truly is a great blessing as the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area celebrates its 40th anniversary with relief and great joy!  On Oct 19,1978 the name “Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area” is brought forward to city council with a biography about Richard St. Barbe Baker.  On Dec 28, 1978 it is proposed that the area become a park and on Jan 2, 1979, this is recommended by council.

bracelets dawn dusk friendship
!

Please take the time to stop and say thank you for this tremendous announcement from Saron Fanel, Video Journalist, who reported on the City of Saskatoon and the RM of Corman Park who are hoping to have vehicle barriers in place by the fall. And please take time to reflect of how great it is to live here in Saskatoon, and in the surrounding area of Corman Park, indeed!

The very marvelous thing is that to get involved in shaping Saskatoon, as a citizen of this fair city, there is also an invitation to email communication division and share your feedback; “Better services start with you.”source

Please take time to view the Saskatoon Speaks You Tube video inviting you to make comments about what is important to you as the City of Saskatoon grows to 1/2 million by the year 2023.

Extend the highest praise, and thank you to the City of Saskatoon and to the RM of Corman Park, as they embark on the process of installing vehicle barriers to be put into place by the fall.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“Has any one of us ever really seen a Tree? When we become aware of trees we may catch glimpses of them in moments of spiritual vision and, identifying ourselves with the trees, become conscious of the rising of the sap; the upward thrust of life; leaf burgeoning, their consciousness of the changing seasons; we may share their passionately boisterous exuberance of life in the height of a storm, and their tranquility when at rest; with them we will enjoy the glad murmur of the ripening seed clusters when after weeks of drought the steady warm rain brings relief to thirst; and we will know that these creatures, our elder brethern, are intimately related to us in their love and hunger for life. We may even catch their enthusiasm and aspire heavenwards while still rooted in our Mother Earth and in communion with our fellow men and, tree-wise, strive to make the Earth more fruitful again.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

 

Walk the Walk

Two issues have recently resurfaced.

    1. Today, January 25 2018, is female blackout from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. It’s a movement to show what the world might be like without women. Your facebook photo should just be a black square so that men wonder where the women are. Pass it only to women. It’s for a project against domestic abuse, It’s no joke. Share it on your facebook page.
    2. A reminder came forward that the Jane’s Walk believes in walkable cities in honour of journalist Jane Jacobs OC OOnt (May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006).  Jane’s Walks are one way to get people out into nature, into their cities, and in touch with the people of their community.  And as the Saskatoon Jane’s Walk representative states; Jane’s Walks “support ensuring [that] the Afforestation area remains a walkable safe location for all to enjoy”

Have you walked the afforestation areas?  Have you really walked these urban regional park to be able to discover and respond to the complexities which exist through observation?  Here is a photo album of images photographed since the community volunteer clean ups.   [October 2016 1,500 kilograms (3,300 pounds) ~ July 2016 8,300 kg (18,300 pounds or 9 tons) ~  June 2015 3,300 kilograms (7,275 Pounds) of trash, chesterfields, construction materials with nails, shingles, and tires were removed.] And this is a map [west portion of afforestation area only] exploring the complexities which have been observed since the cleanups.  Who has walked George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

How can the Afforestation areas be a “walkable safe location for all to enjoy”?  And today, January 25, 2018 ~ female black out day, would women feel comfortable walking in the city, in all urban regional parks, and in the afforestation areas?

Walk the walk
AND
Talk the talk

Today, female blackour from 8L00 a.m. to 9/l00 p.m. It's a movement to show what the world might be like without women. Your facebook photo should just be a black square so that men wonder where the women are. Pass it only to women. It's for a project against domestic abuse, It's no joke. Share it.
Female Black Out Day: what the world might be like without women

Very wonderfully, full city addresses have been enabled for all city parks, and for the afforestation areas.  An address very wonderfully aids in the safety process in cities, as addresses enable a call for help to friends or family and to emergency support.

Fires have sprung up in the afforestation area such as in the spring of 2016. Besides fires in the Afforestation areas, in both 2011 and 2016 huge grass fires broke out near the afforestation areas.  The afforestation area is adjacent to the Canadian National Railway ‘CN Chappell Yards.’  A railway yard, is a complex series of railroad tracks for storing, sorting, or loading/unloading, railroad cars and/or locomotives which may carry flammable contents.  The afforestation area is within the City of Saskatoon city limits, adjacent to the neighbourhoods such as Montgomery Place, and also adjacent to the homes of Cedar Villa Estates of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344. Thankfully there are no more tires in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area which may fuel such fires should they become out of control. And of course, the afforestation areas are home to diverse biodiversity, woodlands, wetlands and grassland flora and fauna as well as host to many and several visitors from the city exploring nature on bicycle, walking, or with their dogs.  The visitors include men, women and children.

“Some believe it is only great power that can hold evil in check, but that is not what I have found. It is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay. Small acts of kindness and love.”  J.R.R. Tolkein Gandalf character

“A city street equipped to handle strangers, and to make a safety asset, in itself, our of the presence of strangers, as the streets of successful city neighborhoods always do, must have three main qualities:

First, there must be a clear demarcation between what is public space and what is private space. Public and private spaces cannot ooze into each other as they do typically in suburban settings or in projects.

Second, there must be eyes upon the street, eyes belonging to those we might call the natural proprietors of the street. The buildings on a street equipped to handle strangers and to insure the safety of both residents and strangers, must be oriented to the street. They cannot turn their backs or blank sides on it and leave it blind.

And third, the sidewalk must have users on it fairly continuously, both to add to the number of effective eyes on the street and to induce the people in buildings along the street to watch the sidewalks in sufficient numbers. Nobody enjoys sitting on a stoop or looking out a window at an empty street. Almost nobody does such a thing. Large numbers of people entertain themselves, off and on, by watching street activity.”
― Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities

At the afforestation areas there are no real demarcations of space, except at the South West off leash recreation area and the east side.  What happened in this areas? What was the result?  Illegal trespass has declined to nil.  Illegal activity [i.e. trash in the park] has declined to nil. Woo Hoo!!!!!!! These portions of the afforestation areas are most definitely showing the progress in tune with the philosophy of Jane Jacobs ~ activist best known for her influence on urban studies [city planning] which introduced sociological concepts such as “eyes on the street”.  Nature enthusiasts, dog walkers, bicyclists, photographers are coming out to these areas …. and …. really enjoying it.  There is safety!  This is wonderful progress!

“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”― Jane Jacobs

The question is asked again, would you, lady, gentleman or child, feel safe today, January 25, 2018 ~  female black out day ~ or any day in the City of Saskatoon, in its urban regional parks, and in the Afforestation Areas? It is hoped that the answer to this question is a resounding “yes!”, if not why not?

Observe, Experience, Do Something.

In honour of female blackout day ~  a movement to show what the world might be like without women ~ perhaps a statue should be erected in the City of Saskatoon afforestation areas.

Why?

“I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy from my having lived in it. “Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“In the words of Henry van Dyke, America’s greatest tree poet,
‘He that planteth a tree is a servant of God;
He provideth a kindness for many generations
And faces that he hath not seen shall bless him.’ ”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

“The robin flew from his swinging spray of ivy on to the top of the wall and he opened his beak and sang a loud, lovely trill, merely to show off. Nothing in the world is quite as adorably lovely as a robin…” Frances Hodgson Burnett The Secret Garden

 

Water Programmes are Essential

I believe that water must be the basic consideration in all our national and earth- wide forest programmes. Streams and rivers must be returned to their natural motion. ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus
Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus winter colours

Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus breeding colours
Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus breeding colours

Horned Grebe

Podiceps Auritus is quite an amazing looking waterbird with yellow / white unique feathers behind its eyes tufted up to appear as “horns”, thus it name. This little bird is quite striking with black head, red eyes, and the white tufted ears bobbing along above a dark chestnut/black coloured body. These are the breeding colours when the Horned Grebe is all dressed up for show and courtship.

There are many books written nowadays which will tell you about birds as folk of the twentieth century see them. They describe carefully the singer’s house, his habits, the number of his little wife’s eggs, and the color of every tiny feather on her pretty wings. But these books tell you nothing at all about bird-history; about what birds have meant to all the generations of men, women, and children since the world began. You would think, to read the words of the bird-book men, that they were the very first folk to see any bird, and that what they think they have seen is the only matter worth the knowing.

Now the interesting facts about birds we have always with us. We can find them out for ourselves, which is a very pleasant thing to do, or we can take the word of others, of which there is no lack. But it is the quaint fancies about birds which are in danger of being lost. They show what the little feathered brothers have been to the children of men; how we have come to like some and to dislike others as we do; why the poets have called them by certain nicknames which we ought to know…~Abbie Farwell Brown

Nesting of the Horned Grebe will occur at a site in shallow water, most commonly amid wetlands flora alongside marshes. Breeding pairs most often choose sites in temperate zones of the Canadian prairies. The nests are made of wetlands plant material and anchored to the plants alongside freshwater marshes for concealment. Symbiosis played a major role in the co-evolution of the prairie marsh eco-system and the Horned Grebe.

Quite the jolliest season of the year, with the birds, is when they begin to require a home, either as a shelter from the weather, a defence against their enemies, or a place to rear and protect their young. May is not the only month in which they build their nests, some of our favorites, indeed, waiting till June, and even July; but as it is the time of the year when a general awakening to life and activity is felt in all nature, and the early migrants have come back, not to re-visit, but to re-establish their temporarily deserted homes, we naturally fix upon the first real spring month as the one in which their little hearts are filled with titillations of joy and anticipation.~C. C. Marble.

Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus Nesting
Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus Nesting

In winter, the Horned Grebe has a black crown, and a pale foreneck, cheeks and underparts, quite distinct from the showy breeding coloration. The Horned Grebe show up here in April, with the majority of sightings in May, June, and July. Sightings of the Horned Grebe continue on until November when they leave to the Aleutians and exposed shorelines of saltwater oceans to overwinter.

A grebe most resembles a small loon when it comes to waterbirds. Grebes in general are ducklike divers with lobed toes (not webbed feet) and sharp pointed bills. This little waterbird is quite fascinating to watch, at times diving down under the water as a loon, at other times just sinking down. The grebe will sit with its body much lower in the water than a duck.

The Horned Grebe needs to be on water to fly, and is not often seen on land. When not on the water, the Horned Grebe will maneuver awkwardly as a jumping and hopping motion, rushing across the surface of the water to gather up speed for flight.

Designated Special Concern by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada COSEWIC, “because over 90% of this bird’s breeding grounds are within Western Canadian wetlands, the continued destruction of marshes and waterways is a major threat to the survival of this species.”Nature Canada “Threats include degradation of wetland breeding habitat, droughts, increasing populations of nest predators (mostly in the Prairies), and oil spills on their wintering grounds in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. COSEWIC

“The global population has been declined by 30% over the last three decades and by 79% within North America. Within 1985 and 2001, grassland and wetland drainage amounted to 5% global habitat loss. Due to global declines, the Horned Grebe has been unlisted from least concern to vulnerable resulting in conservation and research action plans.*

According to the Ministry of the Environment, A breeding bird or breeding Grebe colony is protected May 15 through to July 15 of the year, foot traffic, and other low disturbances must maintain a distance of 100 meters. Medium disturbances such as vehicles and ATVs as well as high disturbances, roads, drilling both must maintain a distance of 200m from loons and any Colonial Nesting Grebes.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Nature Canada suggests:

  • “Tell elected officials that you support the protection of at least half of Canada’s Boreal forest.” “The eco-system of a forest is very fragile. It is very easily upset. This would be a fifth reason why tree cover should be maintained…It is not enough for a mayor to put on his chain and plant a tree but he must plant forest trees for our lives”~Richard St. Barbe Baker. The afforestation areas of Saskatoon are a vital heritage site, and a true testament to the Parks Department of Saskatoon.
  • Dan Kraus, Weston conservation scientist and senior director of conservation program development for the Nature Conservancy of Canada, writes about the temperate prairies, and the endangered grasslands ~ the World’s most endangered eco-system. So it certainly would not hurt to tell your elected officials that you support the protection as well, of the native grasslands of the West Swale, including those of the Afforestation area formerly known as George Genereux Urban Regional Park, and the native grasslands of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.
  • “When viewed in the context of our climate and geological history, it is evident that prairie wetlands are integral and irreplaceable parts of the Saskatchewan landscape.The challenge is to find a place for these wetlands in our social, economic and land-use systems – a place where their protection and conservation is assured by their inherent value.Managing Saskatchewan’s Wetlands” Is there not truly a great symbiosis between woodlands, grasslands and wetlands?
  • “Advocate for greater protection of Important Bird Areas (IBA) in your community and across the country.”  Do you consider Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, the West Swale, and the many and several wetlands around Chappell Marsh an important bird area? Chappell Marsh is huge, extending from Chappell Marsh Conservation Area managed by Ducks Unlimited, into Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area managed by the City of Saskatoon and the Meewasin Valley Authority.
  • “Learn more about IBAs.”
  • “Stay informed about endangered birds and other species”
  • “Thousands of volunteers have helped conserve Important Bird Areas by surveying bird populations, building nest boxes, erecting signs, removing invasive species, planting native grasses, and promoting awareness of the value of wildlife.”

What will you do?

From the account above, can you recognize the Horned Grebe, now on your travels into the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and around about the West Swale wetlands, the series of marshes alongside Chappell Marsh?

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

The elected officials are:

The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau,, P.C., M.P., Prime Minister of Canada, Ottawa

The Honourable Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Her Honour the Honourable Vaughn Solomon Schofield, S.O.M., S.V.M., Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan

Honorable Sheri Benson, Member of Parliament Constituency:Saskatoon West Email:Sheri.Benson@parl.gc.ca

The Honourable Brad Wall, Premier of Saskatchewan. Email premier@gov.sk.ca

Cabinet Minister
The Honourable Scott Moe, Minister of the Environment

Ms. Jennifer Campeau. Saskatchewan Party Saskatoon Fairview ~ representing the regions for the West Swale and Afforestation areas. Members of the Legislative Assembly. casaskatoonfairview@shaw.ca

His Worship Mayor Charlie Clark

Saskatoon City Councillors. Ward 2 – Councillor Hilary Gough and Ward 3 – Councillor Ann Iwanchuk

Shaping Saskatoon Email communications Division

I believe, therefore, that water must be a basic consideration in all our national and earth wide forest programmes. Streams and rivers must be restored to their natural motion and thus floods and droughts must be eliminated. Forests and woodlands are intimately linked with biological, social and spiritual well-being. I believe that the minimum tree cover for safety is l/3rd of the total land area of every country. Every catchment area should have at least this proportion of tree cover made of mixed species including the broad leaved trees” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Collins, Henry Hill Editor. Harper and Row’s Complete Field Guide to North American Wildlife. Harper and Row Publishers. New York. 1981. ISBN 0-06-181163-7 page 12.
Continuing Horned Grebe and Snow Buntings sullivancountybirder, Sullivan & Delaware County Birder’s Blog

COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. COSEWIC. 2009. COSEWIC assessment and status report on the Horned Grebe Podiceps auritus Western population and Magdalen Islands population, in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. vii + 42 pp.
(www.sararegistry.gc.ca/
status/status_e.cfm)

Audubon Mural Project 2016. New York, NY. Bird #20: Horned Grebe: Giannina Gutierrez. Aug 13, 2016 street artstreet artistsNew York

David Krughoff’s Horned Grebe Prairies North Magazine.

Horned Grebe v.s. Highways. CBC.ca The Afternoon Edition. [Saskatchewan Highways and infrastructure have run into a different kind of roadblock at the site of one of their construction projects: the Horned Grebe.]

Horned Grebe. All About Birds Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Horned Grebe Audubon Field Guide

October birding around Victoria on a wonderful weekend hazel, FOSSILS & FAUNA
Dec 4, 2016 birdsbcnature

Horned Grebe videos, photos, and facts. Podiceps auritus. |ARKive

Species Profile Horned Grebe Western population Species at Risk Public Registry. SARA Government of Canada.

Species Profile Horned Grebe Species at Risk Public Registry. SARA Government of Canada.

Horned Grebe Bird Web.

Horned Grebe: Life History All About Birds.

Horned Grebe Bird Watcher’s Digest.

Horned Grebe. Birdinginformation.com

Horned Grebe Wikipedia.

Peterson, Roger Tory. A Field Guide to Western Birds. A completely new guide to Field Marks of All Species Found in North America West of the 100th Meridian and North of Mexico. Peterson Field Guides. Third Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company Boston. 1990. ISBN 0-395-51749-4. page 26

Nature Canada ~ Horned Grebe Species Spotlight

Sibley, David Allen. Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Western North America. Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 2003. ISBN 0-679-45121-8. Page 30.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

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I believe that water must be the basic consideration in all our national and earth- wide forest programmes. Streams and rivers must be returned to their natural motion. What is a natural motion? A river flowing in its natural course comes to a bend. This gives it a spiral motion. It comes to a marrow, this provides tension. It broadens out, here is relaxation. This is how blood circulates in our veins and the sap circulates in a tree. This is the natural motion. When you destroy this natural motion, the water goes on its way sick or cancerous. When water comes up against a dam, the natural motion is destroyed and the water becomes sick. This sickness spreads up to the tributary rivers and to the fields through which these rivers have come and the sickness will go to the fields bordering these rivers and will affect the grazing animals. They say that cancer is a disease of civilization. You will accept that, won’t you? It was unknown till we called ourselves civilized. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Squirrel Appreciation Day

Richard St. Barbe Baker, “You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover.”

Squirrel Appreciation Day

Your Squirrel Sightings Are Needed

American Red Squirrel Baby
American Red Squirrel Baby Courtesy Dan Leveille

Would you believe it, today, Saturday January 21st is Squirrel Appreciation Day! On the SciStarter web site there is a squirrel campaign! All you have to do is have an interest in nature, be able to identify a squirrel (Sciuridae), and report your sighting. The squirrel family includes ground squirrels, flying squirrels (Pteromyini or Petauristini), marmots (genus Marmota), prairie dogs (genus Cynomys), groundhogs (Marmota monax) and chipmunks (family Sciuridae.)   At the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area because of the diversity, woodland and grassland ecosystems, these furry little friends abound hoarding the Scotch Pine Pine Cones, and snacking down on Colorado Blue Spruce cones. It is a squirrel haven! Help biologists by becoming a citizen scientist, and increase the data and information on the urban squirrel.

Additionally, biologists are seeking information on white squirrels. If you have seen a rare white squirrel, scientists are particularly keen to learn more about their habitat and ecology. Find out more about White Squirrel Mapping project.

Researchers are also studying the colour morphing of grey squirrels to black and why this is happening. This species is mainly found along the east coast of North America, however they have been found world wide. Keep you eyes open, and see if this squirrel’s range has extended into the prairies, and if these little squirrels scamper up and down the trees at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Squirrel Mapper will provide more information.

Out of the 262 species of squirrels found in Canada, there are several species of rodents (rodentia; gnawing mammals) in Saskatchewan, and of these, there are the Richardson’s ground squirrel (Urocitellus richardsonii), which may be seen in as colonies on the prairie grasslands. The Franklin’s ground squirrels also known as bush gophers are solitary mammals who enjoy the habitat of the parklands. The Franklin’s ground squirrel (Poliocitellus franklinii) once extremely abundant in the prairies, is seeing a decline in population due to a loss of environment. Additionally in Saskatchewan we spot the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), also nick named the striped gopher. The Northern Pocket Gopher, (Thomomys talpoides) loves the prairie grasslands feasting on clover, dandelion, and goldenrod and will avoid rocky and wet clay-like soil for their underground burrows.

The Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger) has also made appearance in our province over the last 40 years. These are the largest species of tree squirrels which live in North America. The Fox Squirrel is an omnivore, which means it eats the typical nuts, seeds and berries, but will also forage on insects, caterpillars, and young birds These fox squirrels love the elm, balsam poplar, and green ash which are afforested at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and these little rodents will spend the summer gathering food, burying it in the soil in caches for the winter moths.. Be careful not to confuse the more common American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) with the fox squirrel. The American Red squirrel is smaller and has the characteristic reddish fur with a white venter (underbelly). The Red Squirrel loves to feast on seeds and nuts, loving mature forests with especially the spruce, Scotch pine, which is abundantly afforested in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, however Red squirrels also have a taste for berries, flowers, insects, smaller mammals, young birds and eggs.

American Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus),
American Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), Courtesy Cephus

The Northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) has a range which will make sighting in Saskatoon possible, and they happen to love mixed conifereous forests, however you will have to be keen, as they are nocturnal (active at night).

The Groundhog (Marmota monax), or woodchuck’s range, is throughout north eastern United States, carrying over through Canada, which makes sighting one of these very possible. Also called the Canada Marmot or Thickwood badger, loves to feast on Alfalfa, and lives alongside forest clearings. They are able to climb trees for safety.

So next time you are out walking and enjoying the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, take along your camera, and try to spot one of the many species of squirrels in Saskatchewan, and report your sightings!

American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus)
American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) Courtesy D. Gordon E. Robertson

Truly, squirrels, indeed, would agree with Richard St. Barbe Baker, “You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover.”

Please comment on your squirrel sightings on this web page, or send in your photographs! Do you have a squirrel story to tell?

Send in your squirrel photos to the SWOLRA or the Richard St. Barbe Baker facebook pages! Facebook: StBarbeBaker Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Facebook: South West OLRA

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Banks, Shelley. Fox Squirrel in Regina, Saskatchewan. Prarie Nature~ Saskatchewan Birds, Nature, Scenery. February 15, 2013.

Natural Neighbours Selected Mammals of Saskatchewan ISBN 9780889771239. 2001. University of Regina Press.

Ferron, Jean. Squirrel. Canadian Encyclopedia. Feb 7, 2006.

Schowalter, Tim. Rodents Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Centre. University of Regina. 2006.

University of Regina. Canadian Plains Research Center Title Selected Mammals of Saskatchewan. Volume 1 of Discover Saskatchewan series: Natural neighbours Volume 1 of Natural neighbours. Editor Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management. author of text accompanying photos Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management. Edition illustrated
Publisher University of Regina Press, 2001. ISBN 0889771235, 9780889771239.

Wikipedia: Richardson Ground Squirrel | Eastern Gray Squirrel | Flying Squirrel | Chipmunk | Prairie Dog | Ground Squirrel | Tree Squirrel | Fox Squirrel | Franklin’s Ground Squirrel | Northern Flying Squirrel | Thirteen-lined ground squirrel

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
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George Genereux Urban Regional Park

He that planteth a tree is a servant of God;
He provideth a kindness for many generations
And faces that he hath not seen shall bless him.

There is one informal area commonly used for parking at George Genereux Urban Regional Park.

Located in the City of Saskatoon.
The border between the RM of Corman Park and the City of Saskatoon forms the south west boundaries of the park.

George Genereux Park just west off of the Pike Lake Highway (Sk Hwy 7) at Range Road 3063 Please don't drive in the forest
George Genereux Park just west off of the Pike Lake Highway (Sk Hwy 7) at Range Road 3063 Please don’t drive in the forest

GPS provided for Smart Phone map directions

NOTE. Please stop driving on the SK Hwy 7 service road parallel to SK Hwy 7 where indicated to not trespass.
Do not drive on the gravel road south of George Genereux Park (parallel to the Canadian National Rail-line.)  This is a CNR right-of-way, and has restricted access to CNR service personnel only unless you specifically ask permissions from the CNR. Sign posted; “No trespassing”
  1. NE 21-36-6 W3 – George Genereux Afforestation Area -133 Range Road 3063 – GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807

    Directions.
    Drive on 22nd Street West in the City of Saskatoon in a westerly direction. Proceed west through the traffic light intersection at Kensington Boulevard to the Kensington neighbourhood suburban development area, and Betts Road to the Blairmore suburban development area Drive west 460 meters to the traffic light intersection of 22nd Street and Sk Highway 684 (Dalmeny highway). Turn left (south) onto Sk Highway 7.
    Drive south on Sk Highway 7 (the Pike Lake Highway) for 2.376 km.

    • As you are driving south on SK Hwy 7, proceed 1.8 km to the intersection with 11th Street, the 11th Street compost, and the Poor Boys Esso.
    • Driving another 366 meters south after the 11th street intersection you will pass the West Swale wetlands.
    • Proceed another 201 meters after the wetlands, and turn right onto the gravel road. Note this road is signed “Department of Highways only.” For this reason, there is provided another two sets of directions for arriving at this greenspace.

    Follow the Saskatchewan Highway 7 service road parallel to Saskatchewan Highway 7 for 884 meters.

    • Take a “quick left” in 36 meters where the gravel road turns left (southwesterly)
    • 40 meters after turning onto the gravel road there is an “Y-intersection”
    • The SK Hwy 7 service road proceeds in a southwesterly direction parallel to Saskatchewan Highway 7. To achieve success at the commonly used informal parking area, do not turn right and proceed parallel to the wetlands, but keep south-westerly parallel to Saskatchewan Highway 7 for 761.5 meters.

    Arrive at the intersection of Range Road 3063 and Sk Hwy 7 Service Road. Proceed another 122.5 meters southwesterly along Sk Hwy 7 Service Road, and park.
    You have arrived.
    Do not drive in the forest greenspace. There happen to be dog walkers, classrooms of children, families, and cyclists enjoying the greenspace.There is also City of Saskatoon bylaw 7767, “No person shall drive a motor vehicle in any Park unless written or verbal permission to do so has been received from the City.”

  2. NE 21-36-6 W3 – George Genereux Afforestation Area -133 Range Road 3063 – GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807

    Directions.
    Drive on 22nd Street West in the City of Saskatoon in a westerly direction. Proceed west through the traffic light intersection at Kensington Boulevard to the Kensington neighbourhood suburban development area, and Betts Road to the Blairmore suburban development area Drive west 460 meters to the traffic light intersection of 22nd Street and Sk Highway 684 (Dalmeny highway).
    After the traffic lights continue west on Saskatchewan Highway 14 – 22nd Street West for 1.6 km.
    Turn left onto Range road 3063. Drive south for 2.2 km.

    • After turning left from 22nd street, proceeding 1.6 km will take you to the intersection of Township road 364 and Range road 3063. This happens to be the intersection of the north east corner of George Genereux Park. The informal parking area is at the south east corner.
    • Drive another 641 meters south on Range road 3063 to the Sk Hwy 7 service road (the south east corner of the forest.

    Turn right. Drive 131 meters on the Sk Hwy 7 service road.
    You have arrived.
    As above do not drive in the urban regional park greenspace.

  3. NE 21-36-6 W3 – George Genereux Afforestation Area -133 Range Road 3063 – GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807

    Directions.
    Drive on 22nd Street West in the City of Saskatoon in a westerly direction. Proceed west through the traffic light intersection at Kensington Boulevard to the Kensington neighbourhood suburban development area, and Betts Road to the Blairmore suburban development area Drive west 460 meters to the traffic light intersection of 22nd Street and Sk Highway 684 (Dalmeny highway).
    After the traffic lights continue west on Saskatchewan Highway 14 – 22nd Street West for 3.25 km.
    Turn left onto Range road 3064. Drive south for 1.6 km.
    Turn left (west) onto Township road 364 gravel road. Drive west for 1.6 km to arrive at the intersection of Township road 364 and Range road 3063. This happens to be the intersection of the north east corner of George Genereux Park. The informal parking area is at the south east corner.
    Drive another 641 meters south on Range road 3063 to the Sk Hwy 7 service road (the south east corner of the forest.
    Turn right. Drive 131 meters on the Sk Hwy 7 service road.
    You have arrived.
    As above do not drive in the urban regional park greenspace.

  4.  
Afforestation Area Formerly known as George Genereux Park
Afforestation Area Formerly known as George Genereux Park.
Map adapted from a 1996 RM of Corman Park 344 Map

The urban forest ~ “The Afforestation Area formerly known as George Genereux Park” ~ in Saskatoon is located west of Saskatchewan Highway 7.  When driving over the CN overpass  look down to the west and see the mature growth forest of this urban regional park.  This property was bought by the City of Saskatoon in 1960 and afforested in 1972.  1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before city council that these first  660 acres of afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity and this is approved.  It received its name “George Genereux Park” in 1978-1979.  The name George Genereux Park was taken for a pocket park in another area of Saskatoon, leaving this urban regional park without a name.  The Afforestation Area formerly named George Genereux Park is located diagonally across Saskatchewan Highway 7 from the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  The Afforestation Area formerly named George Genereux Park was annexed into the City of Saskatoon boundaries fully in 2015.  See the above map for the location of Saskatoon’s Urban Regional Park – “The Afforestation Area formerly named George Genereux Park”.

directions to George GenereuxUrbanRegionalPark

Before visiting the afforestation areas in May in June please read this article

“George Genereux” Urban Regional Park directions:

The coordinates for Google maps to arrive at  “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park are 52.1132738,-106.7901621,786 for Range Road 3063.  Civic address for this park is 133 Range Road 3063.  There is no formal parking lot, and motorized vehicles need park on the range roads or on the grid township roads.  Best access is travel west out 22nd Street West (Sk Hwy 14) past the Blairmore suburban development centre (Shopping malls)  and Kensington neighbourhood.  Turn left on Range Road 3063.  Proceed south until you arrive at the “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park on Township Road 364.  Receive permissions from the city to drive within the park. Travel by motorized vehicle  into the “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park is subject to fines according to City of Saskatoon Bylaw No. 7767; The Recreation Facilities and Parks Usage Bylaw.

Any person who disposes or dumps waste at  “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park is liable to a fine of $25,000 according to City of Saskatoon BYLAW NO. 8310

What land development and growth is proposed for the land around George Genereux Urban Regional Park?

History of “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

 

“The aim of the Men of the Trees is briefly  ‘ to develop a tree sense in every citizen, and to encourage all to plant, protect and love their native trees; for forestry is among the oldest and most honourable of the peaceful arts of men, and in its practice is unselfish and constructive service.’ “
In the words of Henry van Dyke, America’s greatest tree poet,
He that planteth a tree is a servant of God;
He provideth a kindness for many generations
And faces that he hath not seen shall bless him.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

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Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

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Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Clean, Green Community Scene!

It all adds up, indeed. Good deeds such as cleaning up the community parks are truly contagious

It looks like a fantastic day for the clean up scheduled at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area on Saturday, July 9, 2016, indeed! The honourable Councillor Pat Lorje, who has done so much for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area already, will come out to the community volunteer clean up day. As well as representatives from the Meewasin Valley Authority will also bring Meewasin greetings! The Saskatoon Singing Circle, an affiliate of the Sacred Web Singers will arrive to bring some great tree songs to the volunteers in appreciation of the wonderful works to restore the forest.
Power-Of-Parks-Infographic-w
The Saskatoon Community Public Health Nurse will take care of any safety concerns, and the Saskatoon City Police Community Liason Constable has also been involved with the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area clean up site inspection.

There has been an amazing response from the business and corporate community, and prizes will be randomly drawn at the end of the shifts a fantastic opportunity to offer to the volunteers appreciations for their time offered at the clean up! Remember to pick up your certificate as well before leaving, we truly wish to thank you kindly for coming out and participating.

Additionally, the weather looks like it will cooperate, so all in all, it looks like a very promising day to see immediate and tangible results from trash removal to restore the forest. It is so exciting to look forward to a public space where children, youth, and adults can gather to appreciate the forest in tidy and sanitary conditions. There is no doubt about it, protecting nature, wildlife and wild places is a great environmental community project. Cleaning the waterways and the riparian forest, protects animals, birds, fish, and plant life from the contamination that litter brings. The clean up also sends a powerful message to users of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, that someone cares about this piece of land and the West Swale wetlands, and that this is not the right area to dump their unwanted trash.

There will data cards for this summer Great Canadian Shoreline “Scavenger Hunt” to record just what has been dumped in this amazing forest. Large jugs of water and juices will be available to replenish the water bottles you bring along. Remember your cloth canvas gloves. Gardening gloves or work gloves work much better than plastic or rubber gloves. If plastic or rubber gloves are needed, they will be supplied. Wear you closed toe shoes and footwear and come dressed for the weather which looks like a grand day for the cleanup which is fantastic!

We truly look forward to meeting you at the South West Off Leash Recreation Area parking lot at 8:00 a.m. or 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, July 9, 2016 for the Clean, Green Community Scene. You will have the opportunity to meet like-minded people, and possibly start great friendships. Everyone who comes out will have a great sense of accomplishment, pride and stewardship of the environment. An important benefit of the clean up will be reduced pollution in the West Swale wetlands which directly impact the South Saskatchewan River.
The clean up will have the following impact

  • “Improves the appearance of an area that was
    previously neglected, abandoned, vandalized,
    or misused.
  • Allows community members to use and
    enjoy the improved area more than they did
    before the cleanup.
  • Strengthens the community ties of those
    involved in the cleanup.”Source

By taking part in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area clean up, you will help create a public open space ~ an urban regional park~ which is vibrant, healthy and safe! It all adds up, indeed. Good deeds such as cleaning up the community parks are truly contagious, and will have a huge impact on this amazing green space of Saskatoon as the city grows to 1/2 million by the year 2023.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

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What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

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