Rime Ice landscapes

IMG_0035

Rime ice forms when super-cooled water liquid droplets freeze onto surfaces. Meteorologists distinguish between three basic types of ice forming on vertical and horizontal surfaces by deposition of super-cooled water droplets. Of course there are also intermediate formations, whereas, hoar frost (refers to white ice crystals deposited on the ground or loosely attached to exposed objects, such as wires or leaves. They form on cold, clear nights when conditions are such that heat radiates out to the open air faster than it can be replaced from nearby sources, such as wind or warm objects. Under suitable circumstances, objects cool to below the frost point of the surrounding air, well below the freezing point of water. Such freezing may be promoted by effects such as flood frost or frost pocket. These occur when ground-level radiation losses cool air until it flows downhill and accumulates in pockets of very cold air in valleys and hollows. Hoar frost may freeze in such low-lying cold air even when the air temperature a few feet above ground is well above freezing.” according to Wikipedia

Weather Online UK states that, “Rime is denser and harder than hoar frost, but lighter, softer, and less transparent than glaze.”  This may be the reason why the last week’s winter wonderland did not behave like hoar frost.  If the tree branches were tapped, the “hoar frost” did not fall to the ground, the “rime” held on for six days.  On average, hoar frost will appear in the mornings, and usually disappear by noon when the wind picks up or the sun warms up the temperature of the air.

” Rime ice, formed from supercooled fog (water droplets that remain below freezing until they have a surface on which to freeze), is an accumulation of granular ice tufts on the windward side of exposed objects. These ice needles, about 2 inches (5 centimeters) long, point into the direction from which the wind was blowing during the fog…Generally the ‘feathers’ and ‘tails’ point into the wind, but under calm conditions the ‘needles’ might grow into every direction. This is why they can be mistaken as hoar frost. However, unlike hoar frost rime is formed by freezing fog or cloud droplets. ,” according to OpenSky which is the home for NCAR/UCAR research.  It is true that at the afforestation areas this past week, the trees were showing rime ice formed on the south east sides, which tells the tail that the wind was blowing from the south east during the last few foggy days!!!

The trees situated within the cover of the forest were not as heavily coated as those trees on the southeast perimeter.

Well, whatever the phenomenon, the last week was indeed spectacular with the rime ice on the trees!

Hoar Frost and Rime Ice What is the difference?
Here’s how a gorgeous display of rime ice coated Shenandoah National Park

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area 😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

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Tree Dressing

Tree Dressing Day

first weekend of December.

December 1 & 2, 2018

 

National Tree Dressing Day honours the life-giving blessings of trees and is based upon an ancient custom. “Trees have long been celebrated for their spiritual significance. The simplicity of tying strips of cloth or yarn to a tree is universal and timeless. The old Celtic custom of tying cloth dipped in water from a holy well to a ‘clootie tree’ echoes the practice in Japan of decorating trees with strips of white paper, or tanzaku, bearing wishes and poems. The twenty-first century trend of ‘yarn bombing’ in Europe and North America transforms the local landscape with bright fabrics and yarns, like the Buddhist tradition of tying ribbons around the trunk of the Bodhi tree in homage to Buddha, or the annual Hindu festival of Raksha Bandhan when coloured strings are tied onto trees and plants to call upon the power of nature to protect loved ones.”  Source  It’s a way to say thank you to the trees in your community.

Trees have a way of bringing people together to celebrate a shared heritage. With over 80% of Canadians living in cities and towns, our urban forests are vital to our quality of life, and this recognition will go a long way toward ensuring that they continue to be planted and cared for in urban locations… For every person who stops and thinks about how they can help grow and maintain trees, Canada becomes a cleaner, better country.Cision Canada

In 1922, Richard St. Barbe Baker began the International Tree Foundation with Forest Guides, or Forest Scouts, called the Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees who… “promised before N’gai, the High God, that they would protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.”

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

“I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Children of the Green Earth

Universal Children’s Day
20 November, 2018

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

 

At the last tree planting ceremony attended by Richard St. Barbe Baker, he said the Children of the Green Earth Motto; ”
From our hearts
With our hands
For the earth
All the world together”

Richard St. Barbe Baker planted his last tree on the University of Saskatchewan grounds,  in a ceremony celebrating World Environment Day, June 5.  He died shortly thereafter,  June 9, 1982.

Richard St. Barbe Baker had a dream, a dream that the children of the world would carry on his vision, and plant trees.  In his last few years, Richard St. Barbe Baker concentrated his efforts on forming the International “Children of the Green Earth” organisation.

“I want to help disabled children to have tree friends to whom they can go for healing. They have got to choose their own trees and love them. Trees don’t disappoint; I know from experience, if a child makes friends with a tree, it can be so wonderful.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

ParchmentChildrenMotto

” The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

With spirit we are all children of the cosmos; Without it we are orphaned and adrift.
Deepak Chopra

Love of Wisdom

World Philosophy Day
15 November 2018

Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally “love of wisdom” is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.

 “We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

The Institute of Arts and Letters is an elite group which bestowed upon Richard St. Barbe Baker the The Fellowship of the Institute of Arts and Letters F.I.A.L. for excellence in the promotion of humanitarian and philanthropic endeavour. These prestigious awards are only conferred upon those who are prominent and pre-eminent in this field.

“Almost everywhere in the world man has been disregarding the Divine Law and the Laws of Nature, to his own undoing. In his pride, he has rampaged over the stage of the earth, forgetting that he is only one of the players put there to play his part in harmony and oneness with all living things.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker The Divine Law and the Laws of Nature

St Barbe, the author of over 30 books, has been featured in documentaries, tributes, newspapers and films around the world.

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker Land of Tane

As Jo Lynn Sheane says; “Richard St. Barbe Baker was evidence of the goodness one person can bring to the world.”[1]

“I picture village communities of the future living in valleys protected by sheltering trees on the high ground. They will have fruit and nut orchards and live free from disease and enjoy leisure, liberty and justice for all, living with a sense of their one-ness with the earth and with all living things.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“He [St Barbe] was a real example of what one person can do to make a difference. He was one of the first people to recognized the detrimental effect we have on our planet,” says Glenn Gustafson a senior interpeter with the Meewasin Valley Authority, and creator of the St. Barbe Baker Slide Show.[1]

World Philosophy Day is celebrated every third Thursday of November.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

[1] Sheane, Jo Lynn. ‘Man of the Trees’ St. Barbe Baker fondly recalled at heritage fair.  The Saskatoon Star Phoenix. February 20, 1995

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

What is a Vertical Forest?

Introducing Vertical Forests and Façade Greenscapes

So recently discussing the nestling of naturalized settings in an urban setting such as the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park of the city of Saskatoon a question came up regarding the long range planning of areas in the city. The question was; what exactly is a vertical forest?

Green roofs, façades, and walls, are amazing, aesthetically pleasing, and have a huge positive impact on the environment and your pocket book. A stunning and exquisite living roof or ecowall is nothing but a dynamic expression of health, well-being, life, and movement. Texture, pattern, and fragrance with eco-architecture unite and network businesses and customers, inspire families, and network neighbourhoods. The University of Saskatchewan is implementing a number of green roofs, starting with the College of Law, and residential property owners are initiating their own practices of green roofing.

musée du quai Branly Paris Courtesy Jean-Pierre Dalbéra
musée du quai Branly y Paris Courtesy Jean-Pierre Dalbéra

Living walls and roofs definitely contribute to environment quality and ensure that the home or building owner plays a key part in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). It is without doubt an unequivocal, and irrefutable the wonderful environmental footprint when an eco wall or roof makes an impact on energy efficiency.

Zachary Smith says, “Living walls are visually stunning, yes, but there is much more than meets the eye…[they] promote the positive effects that plants have on individuals’ mental and physical wellness, a key benefit in and of itself.”

These green spaces implemented on buildings such as shopping centres, civic architecture, and private homes provide real, definitive health and well-being benefits. Green buildings add value to the property as well as providing environmental benefits.

A green roof can be an “Ecoroof” requiring minimal maintenance, or it may be a “roof garden” or “podium roof” offering higher variety, and access to people. Can you imagine being a restaurant or lounge owner, and bringing in customers to experience your podium roof? This unique setting could provide recreation, or an amazing amenity featuring additional space for bars, restaurants or cafés. What a drawing card. Can you imagine being The Premier Venue folks choose for graduation and wedding parties, as your living wall becomes the backdrop for the wedding photographs, and reception.

Ronald Lu & Partners Green Wall, Hong Kong 2010
Ronald Lu & Partners Green Wall, Hong Kong 2010

Living walls help nurture the patient in health care or the employee in a business setting. Nature is known for its positive effects on creativity, performance and productivity in the work place. Similarly eco walls foster a healing environment reducing time spent in hospitals, and reducing the patients reliance on pain medications. Hospitals, and care homes both have greater well-being among their residents and patients, staff have a reduced workload and higher capacity to provide satisfying care.

A home owner can establish another garden upon the roof growing edibles or just have an amazing private get away for a relaxing “Staycation”.

Green walls, living walls or vertical gardens on the other hand, increase the buildings insulation creating their own micro-climate, and improving the air quality around the building. The amazing thing to consider is that living walls can be established inside or outside. Another one of a kind concepts for skyscraper developers is integrating “Vertical farming” into their design. This feature would provide residents with salad greens, herbs, and fruit, while landlords would realize reduced energy costs. It would be a “win-win” situation.

Kitchener Ontario Children's Museum courtesy M. Rehemtulla
Kitchener Ontario Children’s Museum courtesy M. Rehemtulla

A Vertical Greenery System (VGS) is mostly developed for aesthetic, environmental and economic benefit regardless for commercial groups or public individual. The foremost benefit of VGS based on last five years studies are thermal reduction, shading and cooling effects, energy efficiency and saving electricity cost Apart of that, VGS acts as acoustic insulation, air filtration, carbon sequestration, biodiversity preservation and increasing property values. (Source) This scientific study has delved into the impact of Vertical vegetation, and the carbon sequestration potential for climate change mitigation.

“Urbanization has led to many environmental issues such as climate change, global warming, urban heat island effect, air pollution, soil and water contamination, floods and acid rain. The contribution of cities and buildings to greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions and energy consumption accumulates over their lifecycle from conception (material collection, transportation, soil excavation, site clearing, etc) to construction (production, transport, distribution, etc), through usage (waste, electricity, energy consumption, maintenance, refurbishment) and finally demolition (disposal, waste). The construction industry has a vital role in creating a more sustainable built environment, and emerging from this realization are niches categorized as sustainable architecture, ecological architecture, climatic design , energy-efficient buildings, green architecture, green building, and sustainable property development” (Source)

A separate method of greening a residence or building is via green façades. Many people may think of a green façade as a partition proferring shade from the sun or as a privacy screen.  This may be the simplest, incorporating climbing vines or hanging gardens.

Hybrid living walls incorporate ideas and systems from both green walls and from green façades, a merger of the two, if you will.

Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana Mexico Courtesy ThelmadatterUniversidad.del.Claustro.de.Sor.Juana.Mexico.Thelmadatter
Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana Mexico Courtesy Thelmadatter

Are there cost savings and financial benefits?  $$$  Business owners can be assured of an increase in customer traffic, as their building is a point of interest and a landmark for people to come and see. Home owners also see a savings to their finances as a green roof will last between 30 – 50 years. (Source) A typical asphalt roof in comparison will last only 15 years in our arid climate with temperature swings between +40 to -40 Celsius. (Source) A green roof or a green wall, reduces the impact of temperature fluctuations on the building due to its unique micro-climate.

“Garden walls contribute to healthy communities, and can serve to introduce green space where ground level landscaping is hard to come by. Plants in communities are linked to a number of benefits, including reduced crime rates and increased civic participation.” (Source)

UniversityofOttawaSocialSciencesBuildingJon Kolbert
University of Ottawa Social Sciences Building courtesy Jon Kolbert

“As the vertical assemblages of plants found on living walls are not commonly found in nature, this gives the opportunity to create a complete new ecosystem able to thrive and develop in cities. Recreating and supplementing threatened habitats within a city setting offers new avenues for conservation. Working on green walls in urban settings is an emerging area of ecology; exploring the functionalities and the possibilities of green walls, and especially living walls, should not be constrained by conventional conservation paradigms. “Source

Rainwater is absorbed by all green spaces, managing the stormwater run off. To help manage the bio-roof, the addition of a cistern would aid the vegetation. (Source)

Both the heating and cooling bills are reduced for the store or home owner. Air conditioning bills reduce in the summer, and the wear and tear on the heating system is also reduced during the winter months. The savings in both climate extremes are amazing when comparing green roofs and green walls to conventional building systems.

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

In addition to the texture, vegetation can be selected and planted in patterns, pictures and murals to “Transform your building wall into a living canvas with a broad palette of plants.” Source

Noise reduction is an amazing feature for residents, developers and architects proposing construction near railway tracks, in a down town area, or near a busy highway or arterial road. Green walls, with their layers of plant material serve to reduce sound carrying into the living space remarkably. Source

A green wall or a living roof will do its part in mitigating climate change. Hard surfaces such as asphalt shingles, brick walls, harness the sun’s heat in the summer months, radiating this heat. Vegetation provides relief from heat islands created by homes and buildings.

Green walls serve to mitigate bird deaths from “Bird strike” on buildings incorporating a large amount of glass windows, a common contemporary architectural feature. Vegetation contributes to our biodiversity, offering homes for bird nests, and assisting in their migration. Naturalists could combine this technology, and those concerned about our dwindling song bird species, and pollinators could select appropriate food sources, and species. In conclusion, green walls or eco roofs both increase biodiversity in urban areas. In neighbourhoods with limited green spaces, perhaps these sources of vegetations are the only space for food, shelter or nesting for the migrating or indigenous animal species.

Bosco Verticale towers in Milan, Italy
Bosco Verticale towers in Milan, Italy

“Animal groups respond differently to the characteristics of green walls and the surrounding features. Importantly, the design and the maintenance interventions of green walls influence their use by animals and, as such, it is possible to modify these environments to make them more attractive to certain animal communities. Whether growing on independent self-supporting structures, or directly on or in buildings, plants can use largely under-exploited vertical space allowing an additional type of ecosystem to be incorporated into the urban environment.”Source

The higher the green environment around a building or home, the cleaner the air. Vegetation reduces pollution, and clean fresh oxygen is available in return.

So comment if you have considered developing an amazing restaurant with a green wall, or if your city features a children’s museum with a living vertical forest.  Perhaps you are a home owner contemplating an eco-roof, or maybe you are an architect wishing to bring into play an apartment or condominium as a vertical forest.  Have you actually done the construction, and comment about how it went.  What do you think?  Do you think it would be delightful to be sitting in a living wall restaurant sipping a cappuccino overlooking the wetlands of Saskatchewan? The possibilities are endless for developers, contractors, and owners.  Conversely, wouldn’t it be so delightful if the greenscape of the naturalized area was extended in a larger point of view, encompassing both the natural green space, and extending upward into a green wall rather than a greyscape?  What a photograph!  Are vertical forests, eco-roofs, and green façades a wonderful way to enhance naturalized reserves in cities such as the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  the George Genereux Urban Regional Park and the each and several multitudes of natural parks and green spaces across the city of Saskatoon.

The Ultimate Treehouse Part 2 of the Vertical Forest

 

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Bibliography

A Hedera green façade – Energy performance and saving under different maritime-temperate, winter weather conditions
A Guide to Green Roofs, Walls and Façades
Build Sask Green
Evaluating the Effects of Façade Greening on Human Bioclimate in a Complex Urban Environment
Experimental study of the urban microclimate mitigation potential of green roofs and green walls in street canyons. ” It was found that the green wall may reduce overheating by one-third in street canyons through maintaining moderate temperatures on the green façade by evapotranspiration. Thus, when vegetated envelopes are used, the air temperature increases less during the day and decreases less at night. Green roofs have the same but less noticeable effects. Similarly, we found that the use of vegetated façades can reduce by 4°C the mean radiant temperature, which directly affects the thermal comfort in the street canyon.”
Green roofs Land Stewardship Centre
Green Roofs: Good for the Economy and the Environment Ecofriendly Sask
Growing Green Guide
Life Cycle Costs of Green Roofs
Living Walls
The Animal Biodiversity of Green Walls in the Urban Environment
Whole life costing: Green roofs

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

 

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

A natural balance

October 4 is World Animal Day

“We believe in the development of a fuller understanding of the true relationship between all forms of life, in an endeavour to achieve a natural balance between minerals, animals and mankind” Segment from the New Earth Charter, Men of the Trees

“Earth is richer for Richard St. Barbe Baker. He knew from his youth that the Earth was a sentient living being and that we humans are an integral part of nature. He is truly a steward of the planet, accepting the task that God gave Adam of tending the creatures He had made. His passion for trees has led him to give his dynamic energy to awakening mankind to the folly of exploiting the tree cover of the earth for gain, without replacing the loss. St. Barbe Baker has probably done more than any man alive to awaken a love of trees.”~Sir George Trevelyan, Bt. M.A.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and …today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth. Richard St. Barbe Baker
Richard St. Barbe Baker

Everything you do counts

 

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

Richard St. Barbe Baker…was another who never lost that childlike faith that each of us can have a tremendous impact on the world. A near-mythical character who came to be called “The Man of the Trees,” St. Barbe started planting trees when he was three years old and didn’t stop until he had planted, or inspired others to plant, 25 billion trees all over the planet. Who could ever imagine that one man could accomplish so much in one lifetime, and inspire so many others to carry on the work?”~P.T. New Age Volume 8 number 4 November 1982

Paul Hanley, a knew personally St. Barbe.  Hanley is a freelance writer, and environmentalist who has written a biography on this internationally known forester, Richard St. Barbe Baker.  Contact Paul Hanley for more information about this book, Man of the Trees. Richard St. Barbe Baker, the First Global Conservationist Foreword by HRH The Prince of Wales Introduction by Jane Goodall.

Richard St. Barbe Baker ~ Inductee into the Environmental Hall of Fame in 1983 (The Mother Earth News. January/February 1984).  Richard St. Barbe Baker, awarded honorary LL.D. at the University of Saskatchewan in 1971.  Order of the British Empire bestowed upon St. Barbe in 1978.

“Just imagine for a moment what it would be like if you really knew that everything you do counts – which, ironically, on a cosmic level, is probably true. If you knew that to be a fact, in a very concrete, immediate way, would you live your life differently? Just today, for example, how might you have related to your children and loved ones if you knew that everything you say and do does affect them deeply and indelibly? How might you change at work? Would you even continue to do the work you do? And what about your community? How often have you hung back from raising issues with your neighbors, your community government, your school, whatever, because everyone knows “You can’t fight City Hall”? And then what about the national and international level? Are you at all active on that scale? How could you possibly have an impact?…But what we can see, incontrovertibly, is that those who choose to believe that what they do does make a difference have a special quality to their lives.~P.T. New Age Volume 8 number 4 November 1982

Paul Hanley also wrote the best selling book Eleven speaking of the time when the planet reaches Eleven billion people ~ echoing the following sentiments of Richard St. Barbe Baker.  What are the choices facing this  generation for the future survival of our planet?  [As of  October 2018 , the world population was 7.7 billion.]

“Under existing systems food looms large and there is a constant threat of famine over wide areas, but if we treat reforestation as seriously as we do national defense, and turn from an animal economy to a sylvan one, we shall be able to look forward confidently to the time when food will worry us as little as the air we breath. Indeed, when we have every man under his own vine and fig tree in a perfect earth, beautified by complete landscape husbandry, then with St. Francis of Assissi, we shall be able to say: ‘Praise be, my Lord, for our Sister, Mother Earth, which does sustain and keep us and bringeth forth diverse fruits and flowers of many colors and grass.~ Richard St. Barbe Baker The Mother Earth News. January/February 1984”

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

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Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

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Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

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