The Forest Maker

Tony Rinaudo, Forest Maker, is one of the presenters who personally knew Richard St. Barbe Baker, and is speaking at the Legacy of Saskatoon’s Secret Forest.

Tony Rinaudo, from Australia happened upon one of St. Barbe’s Sahara books which influenced him.  He is now referred to as the “Forest Maker” saving lives, and awarded the Order of Australia and the alternative Nobel Prize in Stockholm for farmer managed natural regeneration. He is an Australian agronomist discovering a way to grow forests without planting trees.

Tony Rinaudo, BSc AM. Agronomist, Senior Climate Advisor World Vision, Forest Maker, Famine Fighter. Rinaudo is an Australian agronomist who has pioneered and championed a simple method to grow trees in dry and degraded lands. He has empowered and inspired a farmer led movement across continents, regreening the lands, improving the livelihoods of millions and helping to combat biodiversity loss and climate change.

So Tony Rinaudo is speaking at the Legacy of Saskatoon’s Secret Forest on Saturday November 6, at 1:00 pm CST (UTC -6)

Poster
Informational PDF
Brochure / Pamphlet
Eventbrite November 6, 2021 1:00 pm CST https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/184304960097
Aspen Films Website https://aspenfilms.ca/foa/
Website https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com/the-legacy-of-saskatoons-secret-forest/

For more information about Tony Rinaudo;

YouTube and a different introduction on Vimeo

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Nature Snapshot in Time

Eventbrite Registration Sun Sept 19 2:00 Nature Connect BioBlitz – Forest Tour meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1086629,-106.793186

Connect with nature, find out what is really in the forest! What will you discover? Come out and explore George Genereux Park. This event provides a snapshot of nature, ecology and the environment out at George Genereux Park in Saskatoon. It shows how healthy the environment is. It is great for young, families, youth groups. botanists, and the general public to have fun in nature. It sharpens your “Where’s Waldo?” skills and helps to become aware of your surroundings. Caterpillars, butterflies, birds, mushrooms, flowers, squirrels, are all various life forms to take pictures of with the iNaturalist app downloaded on your smart phone. It is amazing just how many of the bio-blitzes undertaken have found another species at risk to be aware of in the afforestation areas.

George Genereux Park Eco-Quest Pamphlet

George Genereux Pamphlet Summer Checklist Pamphlet

George Genereux Sundays At Two with trail map pamphlet

Eventbrite Registration Sun Sept 19 2:00 Nature Connect BioBlitz – Forest Tour meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.792580752.108851 -106.789851 

National Forest Week The last full week of September. Maple Leaf Day the Wednesday of that week.
National Forest Week The last full week of September. Maple Leaf Day the Wednesday of that week.

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1979 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

Sat. Sept 18 7:00 Ryan Brook Saskatoon’s Wildlife—the real night life in Saskatoon! Saskatoon’s trail cams reveal who’s who. 

Sept 19 2:00 Nature Snapshot in Time

Sun Sep. 19 2:00 Forestry Farm Walking Tour

Canada-wide CLS environmental education program explores historical time lines Sun. Sep 19 7:00

Mon Sept 20 2:00 Flag raising Ceremony at City Hall – National Forest Week

Mon Sept 20 7:00 The Urban Forest and Climate Change

During National Forest Week enjoy the self-guided SOS Tree Tour of unique trees in our fair city!

Tues Sept 21 7:00  Dr. Colin Laroque Shelterbelts SB- Decision Support System and Agroforestry

Wed. Sept 22 Maple Leaf Day 7:00 National Healing Forests Truth and Reconciliation

Thurs Sept 23 7:00 Urban forests and greenspaces enhance Saskatoon’s quality of life.

Fri Sept Sep 24 at 7:00 pm When and Where did you see What?!?

Sat Sept 25 7:00 PaRx in Saskatchewan, PaRx, Canada’s First National Prescription Program has officially arrived in Saskatchewan!

Sunday Sunday Sep 26 at 2:00 Forest connections and guided walk

Sunday Sep 26, 2021 at 7:00 pm Our Forests.  Are They Alive?

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Where’s Waldo Nature Connect

“Where’s Waldo” Nature Connect at the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas

What do Sherlock Holmes, Nature, “Where’s Waldo”, conservation and Word Search puzzles have in common? Have fun detecting, and finding nature out of doors in the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas. We need your skills! The more eyes that come out the merrier, and the more variety in species can be found! Young, old and anywhere between, groups and individuals, it all makes a difference to compiling a baseline data inventory at the Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and at George Genereux Park in the City of Saskatoon!

There has not been an ecological assessment conducted at the afforestation areas yet. So many people think that there are only afforested tree species [exotic], and brome grass and nothing else, yet how does that explain a baker’s dozen species at risk? How does that explain the moist mixed grassland prairie species in the trembling aspen bluffs which have remained since before 1972, they are over 50 years old? How many people can actually see the laboratory in ecological succession happening in the afforestation areas? What about the wetlands? How come the forest is raising the water-table for the wetlands, and it has not dried up yet? This was a feature which Richard St. Barbe Baker advocated for a lot. What is it that trees do? Their roots go down, down, down, and bring water up to the leave, where there is transpiration, and there are micro-climates of rain for the trees and forests. Can you imagine if there were more and more trees and forests? Then there would not be micro-climates, there would be larger scale nature based solutions to climate change.

Two sundays in a row two different species at risk have been identified. Their lives depend on you to help document the biodiversity in the afforestation areas! So what will happen next Sunday?

Come out on your own or venture out at a group meet up time as follows:

Aug 8 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Aug 15 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
Aug 22 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1038557,-106.7890613 West Side
Aug 29 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Sep 5 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS
GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
Sep 12 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1038557,-106.7890613 West Side
Sep 19 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Sep 26 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
At the meetups, we can help you get familiar with the iNaturalist app.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

What in the world is a bio-blitz?

A Bio-Blitz is time spent looking for life (bio) in the form of mushrooms, plants, animals, and insects. Another word for Bio-Blitz is Eco-Quest. Here the word Eco-Quest refers to an investigation or a quest to explore what is living in the habitat or environment, or what makes up the eco-system of the area.

Bio-Blitzes or Eco-Quests are ways to connect with nature, become more observant of the surroundings, and discover the world of the afforestation areas.

There is a deep interconnectedness of all life on earth, from the tiniest organisms, to the largest ecosystems, and absolutely between each person.

Bryant McGill

Enviromental sustainability is key in naturing a healthy ecosystem that is mutually beneficial to a healthier quality of life today and in the future.

Wayne Chirisa

Download iNaturalist on your smart phone, sign in with you own user name and password and if you meet up in the afforestation areas Sundays at Two, we will show you how to use iNaturalist in nature to create a database of living organisms who share the park space.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

iNaturalist helped me tell a Robin from a doughnut

Sundays at Two! iNaturalist besides using smart id technology, also has an amazing team working behind the scenes helping to identify your photos. This is why 14,000 people helped me to document plants and animals.

Every Sunday at Two we are meeting at the afforestation areas to document plants and animals, and we hope you will join us. Come with your smart phone, and download the iNaturalist app onto your smart phone before you come out.

iNaturalist Pamphlet

While we are out there, we will give you a tutorial, and then we will find just how many plants, animals, insects and mushrooms we can photograph with the iNaturalist app! It is great fun, and this citizen scientist data collection is ever so helpful to figure out an ecological assessment of the afforestation areas.

All you have to do is register on Eventbrite, and we will send out the GPS coordinates of where we will meet up. Every Sunday at two, we will explore another section in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or in George Genereux Urban Regional Park.

What are bioblitzes?

National Geographic What is a Bioblitz?

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Afforestation Carbon Sinks

Introducing a climate change periodical, Energy Mix speaking about afforestation as carbon sink.

By sequestering carbon in timber, soil, and biomass, newly-planted forests can reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide by 18.06 gigatons

Drawdown as republished in EnergyMix

And it is possible for afforestation to be carried out in ways that are healthy and restorative to local ecologies….the work of Japanese botanist Akira Miyawaki, …cultivates zones dense with native species that grow quickly and foster biodiversity. His plots respond to “human needs for … food, and medicine,” …offering flood and drought protection where little existed before.

Drawdown as republished in Energy Mix

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.com
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas
Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps
1./ Learn.
2./ Experience
3./ Do Something: ***
“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.
“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Meewasin Conservation Award

 

Paul Hanley, author of Man of the Trees Richard St. Barbe Baker, the First Global Conservationist Foreword by HRH The Prince of Wales Introduction by Jane Goodall; was the recipient of the Meewasin Conservation Award.

 

“Paul has been an advocate for conservation of the natural world since his teens.  A longtime advocate for ecological agriculture, he was a founding member of Earthcare, and the editor and co-author of the book Earthcare, Ecological Agriculture in Saskatchewan.  This regional bestseller, was an important tool for the emerging organic farming in the 1980s.  His work in this area was acknowledged with the receipt of the Organic Connections’ Pioneer Organic Communications Award…

To recognize his achievement, Paul received a tree planted in the valley through the Meewasin Plant-A-Tree Program…..”

St. Barbe Baker.

In 2013, the Baha’i Community of Saskatoon partnered with Meewasin to install signage at Saskatoon’s Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and on the U of S campus at the site of St. Barbe Baker’s last tree planting…..”

 

Read More City of Saskatoon. Public Agenda Executive Committee Monday September 21 2015 Council Chamber, City Hall 6.2.2 Meewasin Valley Authority 2014 – 2015 Annual Report page 27 [File No. CK. 430-20]

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)  Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

.


“Be gentle – gentle – gentle with the tree,….Put your hands like this to bless it…I want you to feel your love going out from your fingertips to the …[tree], and, you know, this will help it grow, make it happy…We love to be blessed don’t we? And the trees love to be blessed. ..” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Native Rose Plant Ethnobiology

Native Rose Plant Ethnobiology

Part 6

What is taxonomy? Part 1 | Rosids Part 2 | genus Rosa Part 3
| Rose Species Part 4 | Rose reproduction Part 5 | Bibliography  | New Wild Roses of Saskatchewan and How to Tell them Apart

Ethnobiology embarks on the scientific study of how human cultures interacted with the environment, and the ever-changing relationship with biota and organisms.  Ethnobiologists investigate how human societies have used nature, and how do they view nature in the distant past, to the immediate present.  They investigate the common lore or the folk knowledge of how humans  interact with organisms.  Traditional knowledge is rapidly being lost, and the field of ethnobiology is a process of knowledge acquisition and organisation for the management of useful plant and animal populations in the natural system and environment.

Besides wild animals, humans have been known to value the nutritional value of these plants.  In addition to people and animals, worms and insects have an affinity for the nutrition value of the rose hips, so it is best to check for worms before eating a rose hip.  According to Joseph Shorthouse in his report, Galls Induced by Cynipid Wasps of the Genus Diplolepis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) on the Roses of Canada’s Grasslands, native rose plants “are host to insects in a variety of guilds, including leaf chewers, leaf miners, fluid feeders, stem borers, pollinators, and gall inducers.”

Rose hips with seeds and skins removed make jams, marmalades, catsup, jellies and syrups.  Rose hips are tastiest for those used to a North American diet after the first frost which brings out the sweetness.  This same rose hip pulp may be dried and ground into powder form as an addition to baking recipes or puddings.  Young green rose hips can be peeled and cooked. Rose petals are known for their perfume.

Please be stewards of  both the afforestation areas – Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park forest communities, do not harvest too many parts of the rose plant.  Learn and check into the scientific names of plants, and make a good native rose plant identification from Part 1 Part 2 | Part 3| Part 4 | Part 5 .  Nature is very diverse, and evolves and plant species may hybridize with each other.  When in doubt, please leave the plant out before harvesting so that other visitors and animal foragers may enjoy the native roses.   It is wise take only pictures and to leave no trace when visiting the Saskatoon afforestation areas to mitigate ecological damage.  The afforestation areas are experiencing an exponential increase in the human footprint, and a little foresight will ensure that the plants are not extirpated from the greenspace.  Consider where you are digging and harvesting: do you have permission? Who do you get permission from?  Who owns the land, and who manages the land of the afforestation areas?

“If a man loses one-third of his skin he dies; if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it too dies. If the Earth is a ‘sentient being’, would it not be reasonable to expect that if it loses one-third of its trees and vegetable covering, it will also die?” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Buds and flowers or the soaked and boiled root cambium can be used in the making of rose water, a base for eye wash treatments.  Leaves, flowers and buds can be infused in the making of teas. When using the bark of the rose bush for a tea decoction, muscles would find relief and diarrhea would be relieved.  Flowers and flower buds may relieve diarrhea or stomach upset.

First Nations people sometimes smoked the inner bark like of the rose bush like tobacco.  There are reports that native persons ate the rosehip rinds, and left the seeds to grow again. Eating the layer of hairs around the seeds may cause irritation to the mouth and to the digestive tract.  The rose hips may create diarrhea, if too many are ingested. A compress from the boiled rose roots would relieve swelling.  The solution made from boiled rose roots could be gargled to relieve swelling of tonsillitis and sore throats, or mouth sores.

Besides the ethnobotanical uses of wild roses, rose wood can be fashioned into arrows and pipe stems.  Rose hips would be used historically as beads before mass-manufactured beads were acquired through trade as early as the nineteenth century.  The Cree called the Rosehip okiniy pl. okiniyak ᐅᑭᓂᕀ

Do you think you would like to be an ethnobiolgist? Why or why not?

Debate the efficacy of native rose plants related to ethnobiology and health science, including developing materials to support the arguments for and against a posi៝񑀀on.  Would ethnobiological approaches contribute to mental, physical, or spiritual perspectives on health?

Do native rose plants provide any important macronutrients to maintain human, insect or animal health?

Do humans still rely on native rose plants for treating illness, disease, or to improve health and wellness?  Are native rose plants a common garden plant for most city residents?  How have communities and people changed historically to contemporary times?  Could you purchase herbs, vitamins, essential oils from native rose plants in the local grocery store?  in the health food store?

Have native rose plants contributed to traditional or indigenous rituals or ceremonies or in  health care?  Do native rose plants contribute in these same ways to any other culture world wide?

If a  health care professional must weigh the following ethical decisions would a health care professional work hand in hand with an ethnobiologist?

  • What can be done for the patient? (intervention technologies)
  • Does the patient understand the options? (informed consent)
  • What does the patient want? (autonomy)
  • hat are the benefits? (beneficence)
  • Will it harm the patient? (non‐maleficence)
  • Are the patient’s requests fair and able to be satisfied? (justice)
  • Are the costs involved fair to society? (economic consequences)

When relying upon the various components of the native rose plant for health care, contrast – researching the differences, and compare -delving into the similarities through study those  decisions made related to ethnobiology and health care from the various viewpoints of individuals who hold different beliefs.

How do plants – the native rose bushes, and animals – humans harvesting petals, root parts, and leafs interact to meet their basic needs?

What are some uses of the various parts of a rose bush plant based upon the form and materials that the plant is made of?

Compare the texture, and properties of the various part of the native rose plant.  How do the leaves, petals, rose hips and stems compare with hardness, smell, flexibility, etc  How do the characteristics of the rose plant create a useful feature for the plant in its survival?  How do these same characteristics suggest that the various parts of the rose plant might be useful for a specific function, material source or usefulness for different objects.

How do people show respect for living things such as the native rose bush plants?

Describe and evaluate the methods in which the parts of the native rose plants may be used appropriately and efficiently to the benefit of themselves, others, and the environment.

How do humans and animals take note of their senses as they interact with a native rose bush.  If humans were to eat the rose hip or smell the rose flower, what are some safety considerations?

What season would be great to find a rose hip?  What time of the year would people locate a rose flower?  Why do roses make these adaptations?

What are the consequences of combining a professional health care approach with the ethnobiologist report?  Create and debate with arguments for and against a posi៝tion or hypothesis.

Do you know of another way that humans interacted with native rose bushes?

Identify both macronutrients and micronutrients found in the various plant parts of the native rose bush.  Show how these sources and the amounts found in the native rose plant are necessary for health, and how they may affect the wellness of a human or animal.

Create a through scientific investigation into ethnobiology regarding native rose plants.  Start with a question, then create a hypothesis, and then design a procedure to test the hypothesis with those details needed to collect and analyze the data.

What structural or physiological adaptations and methods does the rose hip employ to defend itself against predators?

Analyze and debate how the personal beliefs, culture and understanding effects the appreciation of place based learning  with the environment is influenced bypersonal experiences and cultural understandings.

Discuss the roles of native rose plants as providers of medicinal, spiritual, nutritional needs of Western, First Nations, Métis and other cultures.

How many native rose bushes would you need to grow to sustain healthy eating practice for various ages, sizes and types of people for their lifestyle requirements?

What is appeal from the three native rose species to animals that live in the afforestation areas? Prickly Rose (Rosa Acicularlis Lindl.) the Prairie Rose (Rosa arkansana)  and Wood’s Rose, or Wild Rose (Rosa woodsii)

What is appeal from the three native rose species to humans historically?  Do the rose species offer the same advantages? Prickly Rose (Rosa Acicularlis Lindl.) the Prairie Rose (Rosa arkansana)  and Wood’s Rose, or Wild Rose (Rosa woodsii)

Are there any other rose species which you may see in the afforestation areas?  Why or why not?

Which rose species have you seen in the afforestation areas?

What happens from over-harvesting?

What is a hori hori?

Who owns the land, and who manages the land of the afforestation areas?

Can you establish native rose plants in your own yard, or in your community garden?

Bibliography for Native Rose Plants Part 1 Part 2 | Part 3
| Part 4 | Part 5  | Part 6

  1. Rosa arkansana Porter in T. C. Porter and J. M. Coulter, Syn. Fl. Colorado. 38. 1874., Flora of North America. FNA Vol. 9., 1998–2014, retrieved June 20, 2019
  2. Rosa woodsii Lindley, Ros. Monogr. 21. 1820., Flora of North America. FNA Vol. 9., 1998–2014, retrieved June 20, 2019
  3. Rosa acicularis Lindley, Ros. Monogr. 44, plate 8. 1820., Flora of North America. FNA Vol. 9., 1998–2014, retrieved June 20, 2019

Banerjee, S. Mishtu; Creasey, Kim; Gertzen, Diane Douglas (January 2001), Native Woody Plant Seed Collection Guide for British Columbia (PDF), Ministry of Forests Tree Improvement Branch, retrieved June 20, 2019

Bebeau, G.D. (2013), Common Name Prairie Rose (Prairie Wild Rose, Arkansas Rose), The Friends of the Wild Flower Garden, Inc. Trees Shrubs of the Eloise Butler Wildflower garden in the United States., retrieved June 20, 2019

Bessey CE (1908) The taxonomic aspect of the species question. Am Nat 42:218–224

Brayshaw, T. Christopher. (1996), Trees and Shrubs of British Columbia, UBC Press, ISBN 0774805641, 9780774805643 June 20, 2019

Brennont; et al. (October 24, 2018‎), Sessility (botany), Wikipedia, retrieved June 19, 2019

Britton, Nathaniel Lord; Brown, Addison (1970), Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States and Canada, Volume 2 of An Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States and Canada: From Newfoundland to the Parallel of the Southern Boundary of Virginia, and from the Atlantic Ocean Westward to the 102d Meridian, Dover Books on plants. Dover Books. Courier Corporation, ISBN 0486226433, 9780486226439, retrieved June 20, 2019

Brya; et al. (April 14, 2019‎), List of systems of plant taxonomy, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Chaney, Cathryn (2019), What Is the Calyx of the Flower?, Home Guides SF Gate, retrieved June 20, 2019

Clark, Lewis J. (1974), Lewis Clark’s field guide to Wild flowers of forest and woodland in the Pacific Northwest, Gray’s Publishing Limited, ISBN 0-88826-048-2. Page 51.

Common Name Prickly Rose (Bristly Rose), The Friends of the Wild Flower Garden, Inc., 2013, retrieved June 19, 2019

Common Name Wood’s Rose (Mountain Rose, Western Rose), The Friends of the Wild Flower Garden, Inc., 2013, retrieved June 19, 2019

Conrad, C. Eugene (July 1987), Common Shrubs of Chaparral and Associated Ecosystems of Southern California (PDF), United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. Berkeley, California. General Technical Report PSW-99., retrieved June 20, 2019

Cormack, R.G.H. (1974), Wild Flowers of Alberta, Commercial Printers Ltd. Edmonton, p. 159, ISBN 0-88826-048-2

Coxhead, Peter; et al. (June 17, 2019‎), Stamen, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Culver, Denise; Smith, Pam (June 26, 2018), Botany Primer (PDF), Colorado Natural Heritage Program. Warner college of Natural Resources. Colorado State University., retrieved June 20, 2019

Details of… Scientific Name Rosa woodsii, School of Horticulture Plant Database, 2015, retrieved June 19, 2019

Dgettings; et al. (June 16, 2019), Glossary of botanical terms, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Fora of Wisconsin. Rosa acicularis, Wisconsin State Herbarium, UW-Madison, retrieved June 19, 2019

Harika, Gupta, 6 Major Types of Inflorescence (With Diagrams), BiologyDiscussion, retrieved June 19, 2019

Hauser, Alan S (2006), Rosa arkansana, Fire Effects Information System (Feis) Syntheses about fire ecology and fire regimes in the United States USDA, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laborator, retrieved June 20, 2019

Jain, Khusboo, 10 Main Types of Stipule Present in a Plant (With Diagram), BiologyDiscussion, retrieved June 19, 2019

Jiddani; et al. (May 23, 2019‎), Pinnation, Wikipedia, retrieved June 19, 2019

Keane, Kathlee; Howarth, Dave (2003), Field Guide of Medicinal Plants for the Prairie Provinces The Standing People, Rootwoman and Dave, p. 74, ISBN 0-9699505-3-5

Ladyka, Colin, Rosa acicularis, Colin’s Virtual Herbarium, retrieved June 20, 2019

Lee, Glen (1998–2014), Rosa acicularis (Prickly Rose) – photos and description, Saskatchewan Wildflowers, retrieved June 20, 2019

Lee, Glen (1998–2014), Rosa arkansana (Prairie Rose) – photos and description, Saskatchewan Wildflowers, retrieved June 20, 2019

Lee, Glen (1998–2014), Rosa woodsii (Wood’s Rose) – photos and description, Saskatchewan Wildflowers, retrieved June 20, 2019

Monophyletic, Biology Dictionary, 2019, retrieved June 20, 2019

Rosa acicularis Lindl, Northern Ontario Plant Database, June 19, 2019, retrieved June 20, 2019

Online Cree Dictionary, Canadian Heritage. Miyo Wahkohtowin Education Authority, 1980, retrieved June 20, 2019

Range Plants of Utah. Woods Rose, Extension Utah State University., 2017, retrieved June 19, 2019

Rosa arkansana – Porter, Plants For A Future, 1996–2012, retrieved June 20, 2019

Rosa arkansana (Prairie Rose), Minnesota Wildflowers A field guide to the flora of Minnesota, 2006–2019, retrieved June 20, 2019

Runesson, Ulf T., Rosa acicularis Prickly Wild Rose, Faculty of Natural Resources Management, Lakehead University, retrieved June 20, 2019

Salick, Jan (1998–2014), What is Ethnobiology?, Society of Ethnobiology. partially excerpted from 2002 NSF Biocomplexity Workshop Report: “Intellectual Imperatives in Ethnobiology”, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO, retrieved June 20, 2019

Soltis, Doug; Soltis, Pam; Edwards, Christine (2005), Core Eudicots, Tree of Life Web Projects, retrieved June 20, 2019

Species: Rosa acicularis, Fire Effects Information System (FEIS). USDA. US Forest Service Department of Agriculture, 2019 June 10, retrieved June 19, 2019

Stevenson, Dennis William (2019), Angiosperm Plant, Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., retrieved June 20, 2019

Taylor, Thomas N.; et al. (2019), Rosids, first published Paleobotany (Second Edition), 2009. Republished. Science Direct. Elsevier B.V., retrieved June 20, 2019

Tbhotch; et al. (April 18, 2019‎), Plant Reproduction, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Tdslk; et al. (May 28, 2019‎), Achene, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Trondarne; et al. (May 30, 2018‎), Vessel element, Wikipedia, retrieved June 20, 2019

Vance, F.R.; Jowsey, J.R.; McLean, J.S. (1980), Wild Flowers Across the Prairies. Field Use Edition, Western Producer Prairie Books. Saskatoon., p. 67-68, ISBN 0-919306-74-8, 0-919306-73-X

Wild Rose Comparison, The Friends of the Wild Flower Garden, retrieved June 19, 2019

Wild Rose (Rosa acicularis), British Columbia Outdoor Wilderness Guide. BC Adventure, 1995 – 2018, retrieved June 20, 2019

Wild Roses, Canadian Wildlife Federation, 2019, retrieved June 20, 2019

Wood’s Rose Rosa woodsii Lindl. (PDF), Plant Guide. United States Department of Agriculture USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service., 1995 – 2018, retrieved June 20, 2019

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain. ” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 “We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Rethinking Boundaries

 

“Rethinking Boundaries.

The issues of who owns what, and off site issues such as noise, have a huge impact on the way a site can work as a landscape.  The way in which a site has been defined should be kept in mind when any project starts…Our work, more often than note, is about how people use spaces, how they live in  places, what they do, how they walk, dance, play, and rest.  Designing for people has the added benefit of empowering a proprietary population, people who will not only care about but care for the landscape.”  Ruddick, Margie.  Wild by Design.  Island Press.  Washington. 2016

Neault Road & the Afforestation Areas: The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans. (source and map page 26-27)  What is a rural commercial/industrial area?

“The Rural Commercial/Industrial category accommodates general commercial and industrial uses, including lightly-serviced industrial, storage, and commercial areas that require a large land base. This area shall be differentiated into Rural Commercial and Rural Industrial areas through future planning” Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan May 2017

 George Genereux Urban Regional Park is quarter section is 160 acres or one forth of a square mile which is a very very small amount of land in comparison to the massive number of sections under review and planning currently.(source and map page 26-27)

The land surrounding George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area) as previously mentioned is rural commercial/industrial area and takes up approximately 11 quarter sections of land (See map)- so how will the land planning affect the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area)? (source and map page 26-27)

How will the city of Saskatoon and greater metropolitan area tackle the particular benefits of the George Genereux urban regional park?  How will the George Genereux Urban Regional Park be preserved in perpetuity, as per the 1972 proclamation by the City of Saskatoon during this next phase of expansion?  As the population of the greater metropolitan area designs ever increasing land masses for commercial, industrial, and residential, where sill the quarter section of land afforested end up?

Did you know that trees, forests, and afforestation areas do help protect you from carcinogens!!!!  So in the middle of a rural commercial/industrial area, the George Genereux Urban Regional Park would mitigate harmful emissions which arise from rural industrial activities.  As rural and urban residents the information from long range planning provides a safer and healthier space for everyone to live and reside.  Building our urban forest is an amazing testament to both the city and the P4G planners.

“Our green space is more than just beautiful – it provides an abundance of ecological services. Purifying the air we breathe and the water in which we swim and drink are but a few examples. The cumulative benefits of these life-sustaining services provided by the urban canopy have been valued at more than $80-million annually. Ecological services such as these help to remediate some of the negative health effects brought on by industrial activities and the resulting pollution.  ”
Prevention as the cure: How trees help protect you from carcinogens

Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authority (SREDA).  The P4G meets in the effort to expand the city of Saskatoon, and surrounding environs to  between 273,000 and 301,000 by 2020; 302,000 and 349,000 by 2025; 333,000 and 405,000 by 2030; and between 368,000 and 470,000 by 2035.  (source) As a matter of fact Saskatoon eyes 1M population in 50 years.

“The prescription for this new global market economy is to rob federal governments of all legitimate roles in setting standards, whether for the health of the people or the environment. Deregulation and decentralization become dominant policy since all regulations are viewed as violations of the freedom of the market. Laws protecting wildlife, natural resources like forests, or for that matter, the quality of air, water and soil, or the integrity of biodiversity, are viewed as unacceptable obstacles in the part of the market’s role in mediating all matters. Still another aspect of the new global order is privatization. The private sector is to be trusted to apply the laws of the marketplace to all matters social and environmental. The test for response to toxins in our environment is to measure the harm of continued use against the alleged greater economic harm of a ban, even if the substance is a carcinogen, the benefits being easier to quantify than the harm, when it involves human pain and suffering. ” Knelman, F.H. , Ph.D.  The Sociology of Health The Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine Vol. 11, 3rd Quarter 1996 

 

 

“The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

With spirit we are all children of the cosmos; Without it we are orphaned and adrift.
Deepak Chopra

 

“what we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another” Mahatma Gandhi.

Gaia

“If a man loses one-third of his skin he dies; if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it too dies. If the Earth is a ‘sentient being’, would it not be reasonable to expect that if it loses one-third of its trees and vegetable covering, it will also die?”
Richard St. Barbe Baker

“To view nature as a vast ‘sentient being’ is to see it alive and imbued with a spirit or a soul just as did our ancestors for hundreds of thousands of years. Today we tend to dismiss this view as archaic, crude or rudimentary, but why as Theodore Rozsack wonders, “should it be thought crude or rudimentary to find divinity brightly present in the world where others find only dead matter or an inferior order of being?” writes Edward Goldsmith (8 November 1928 – 21 August 2009)

Edward Goldsmith, was an Anglo-French environmentalist, writer, philosopher.  As a deep ecologist and systems theorist, Goldsmith was an early proponent of the Gaia hypothesis which proposes that living organisms interact with their inorganic surroundings on Earth to form a synergistic and self-regulating, complex system that helps to maintain and perpetuate the conditions for life on the planet.

“The new paradigm may be called a holistic worldview,” Fritjof Capra (born February 1, 1939), physicist and best selling author of The Tao of Physics and Turning Point.  Capra continues, “seeing the world as an integrated whole rather than a dissociated collection of parts. It may also be called an ecological view, if the term ‘ecological’ is used in a much broader and deeper sense than usual. Deep ecological awareness recognizes the fundamental interdependence of all phenomena and the fact that, as individuals and societies, we are all embedded in (and ultimately dependent on) the cyclical processes of nature.”

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s Creation, this beautiful Earth. The ancients believe that the Earth was a sentient being and felt the behavior of mankind upon it. As we have no proof to the contrary, it might be as well for responsible people to accept this point of view and behave accordingly.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Do you agree, is the world a vast ‘sentient being’?

 

“I began to see that the survival of primitive people and of the environment were inseparable.  Primitive people were disappearing. So was wildlife. I realised that the root problem was economic development. So I decided to start a paper [Blueprint for Survival] to explore these issues.”  Edward Goldsmith

Further Reading
11 Billion people will share this planet by century’s end. This will change everything.  

Book Review. The Web Of Life by phyicist Fritjof Capra.  Scott London.

Capra, Fritjof. The Web Of Life (excerpt)  Thinking Allowed DVD with Jeffrey Mishlove. You Tube Video.

Cummin, Vivien.  How many people can our planet really support? BBC News. Earth. March 14, 2016

Gaia Hypothesis. Environment and Ecology.

Hanley, Paul. “Eleven” Live Presentation Paul Hanley begins at 4:14 Wilmette Institute You Tube video.

Horton, John and Glen Newey editors.  The Political Theory of John Gray.   Routledge ISBN 1134212631, 9781134212637

Lovelock, James.  Population Reduction “Max 1 billion”
Parkins, Keith. The Way: An Ecological World View – Edward Goldsmith (Themsis Books, 1996) February 2000

Rosling, Hans. Why the world population won’t exceed 11 billion. TGS. org.You Tube video

St. Barbe Baker, Richard. Why I am Vegetarian. 1957 The Happy Cow.

Vyawhare, Malavika. Can the Planet Support 11 Billion People? By the end of this century, that many people may be inhabiting this planet, according to the latest U.N. projections. E&E News.  August 12, 2015

“If in some small way I’ve helped to slow the runaway juggernaut that we’ve created, or make people aware of it, that has to be a good thing,” Edward Goldsmith

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
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Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

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“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

 

“From the forest and wilderness come the tonics and bark which brace mankind…A town is saved, not more by the righteous men in it than by the woods and swamps that surround it…”
-Henry David Thoreau

 

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'”
Richard St. Barbe Baker