Measure Progress with your Camera

September 30, 2017

Save your Photos Day!

“Almost everywhere in the world man has been disregarding the Divine Law and the Laws of Nature, to his own undoing. In his pride, he has rampaged over the stage of the earth, forgetting that he is only one of the players put there to play his part in harmony and oneness with all living things.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Can this be true?  Are the animal species in decline?  What has been done to the environment  with the increase of forest fires?  In years gone by stories were told of animals pressed south escaping the heat of the forest fires.  This year on camping trips were the sounds of gun fire heard protecting the urban centres from the wild beast seeking safe haven from the forest fires raging around them?  Just as urban centres needed to evacuate, so to, the wild animal would need to evacuate the forest, to find what?  Is there a safe place for the forest animal to escape the forest fire?

If cities are ever expanding and agricultural land fills up the rural country side, where, then are the forests, the native flora and fauna?  Can there be any forest stories still to be told?  Will our grandchildren know the deer, the beaver and the squirrel?  What is being done to save our forests, to save the native flora and fauna?

“Progress does not have to be patented to be worthwhile. Progress can also be measured by our interactions with nature and its preservation. Can we teach children to look at a flower and see all the things it represents: beauty, the health of an ecosystem, and the potential for healing? ” Richard Louv

Do you enjoy a relaxing picnic in the woods?  Have you walked barefoot down the pathways?  Have you caught on photograph the tender wild strawberry leaf in the morning dew?  Do you sight through your camera the dazzling show of the sun backlit on the forest leaves?

It is vital to celebrate our forests, and the celebration of life and beauty.  Save your photo in  your forest story you may wish to add to the 150 forest story compilation today! Saskatoon’s Forests. Our 150 Forest Stories, Our Future, Celebrating Saskatoon’s Forests!

Let us rejoice in the wonder of nature and our environment,as Richard St. Barbe Baker says;

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

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Native Prairie

Saskatchewan’s 19th Native Prairie Appreciation Week June 18-24, 2017!

“Everyone can play a role in the conservation of prairie landscapes and a great first step is learning more about them,” Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan’s manager Carolyn Gaudet said. “We are encouraging all Saskatchewan residents to explore and experience what native prairie has to offer.paNOW

“When the adventurers, who first penetrated these wilds, met, in the centre of the forests, immense plains, covered with rich verdure or rank grasses, they naturally gave them the appellation of meadows. As the English succeeded the French, and found a peculiarity of nature, differing from all they had yet seen on the continent, already distinguished by a word that did not express any thing in their own language, they left these natural meadows in possession of their title of convention. In this manner has the word “Prairie” been adopted into the English tongue. ~J. Fenimore Cooper”

“There’s nothing like going out into a patch of native prairie and seeing the birds, the wildlife and the grasses that have been around for a thousand years,” Gaudet said. “The winds blowing through the grasses. The birds chirping.620 CKRM

I’ll pack with care our fragile dawn—

The dawn we laughed to greet;

I’ll send the comfort of the grass

That once caressed your feet.

No yearning love of mine I’ll send

To tear your heart in two—

Just earth-peace—home-peace—still and strong—

These things I’ll send to you.” A Box from Home By Helen Cowles LeCron

Grasses can, and do occupy wide tracts of land and are evenly distributed worldwide. As grasses do not like shade, they are not usually abundant within the forests, however grasses do indeed occur in open spaces, occupying every type of soil, in all kinds of situations and under all climatic conditions. For those living on the prairies, it is evident that grasses are usually successful in occupying large tracts of land to the exclusion of other plants, and yet, though the actual number of individuals of any species of grass, will far out-number those of any species of any other family of flora, they are very difficult to readily distinguish from one another. What an amazing life comes forward when looking at the grass flower through a magnifying lens upon closer investigation. For the prairie grasslands resident, it may indeed be clearly interesting to see where and how grasses vary.

As with flora species, grasses may perhaps fall into categories and be classified as native; annual, biennial or perennial; or introduced invasive, and endangered. Though true Grasses fall into the order Graminaceae (Gramineae) the word grass may signify any old plant of small ribbon-like leaves. With a bit of attention, and observation, it may come about, that the study may elicit those native grasses from agricultural cultivated species or those considered invasive. At this time of year, when the grasses are awash in blossom, is one of the best, quickest, and sure way of capturing the species of grass under observation.

Within the grasslands, are native flowers, starting out in the spring low to the ground as crocus and spring avens with furry coats. As spring evolves to summer, the flowers are higher and higher in stature to peek out over the top of the emerging grassland cover.

Snowberry bushes, trembling aspen, buffaloberry ofttimes line the perimeter of the grasslands affording nesting areas off the ground for species of birds for the avid bird watcher.

The flora may bring along invertebrates, which, themselves are interesting and important. Be they butterflies, pollinator insects such as bees or flies, herbivore or predator insects spiders, grasshoppers, and beetles.

It is with such diversity of species and functions, that an ecosystem is resilient in times of drought, fire, or flood. As Chris Helzer – the prairie ecologist – says the “little things are going to save the world.”

To get involved, look for #NPAW17 on Twitter, and check out weblinks below.

I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all. Richard St. Barbe Baker

2017 NPAW Poster Contest Information Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (Sk PCAP)

Summer Field Tours Native Plant Society of Saskatchewan

Native Prairie Appreciation Week Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (Sk PCAP)

2017 May Prairie Conservation Action Plan Newsletter

Native Prairie Appreciation Week celebrates ‘sea of grass’ paNOW

Native Prairie Checklist Summer 2017 suitable to print out on paper Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (Sk PCAP)

what is Native Prairie? a teacher resource. Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (Sk PCAP)

Native Prairie Appreciation Week – Youth Poster Contest Discover Moose Jaw

Native Prairie Appreciation Week Discover Estevan.

Native Prairie Grassland highlighted this week in Saskatchewan 620 CKRM

2017 Native Prairie Appreciation Week Saskatchewan Forage Council June 22. 2017

Saskatchewan Proclaims 19th Annual Native Prairie Appreciation Week Government of Saskatchewan June 12, 2017

It is precisely what is invisible in the land… that makes what is merely empty space to one person, a place to another. Barry Lopez.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority as the MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)” .

 

“By simplifying our lives, we rediscover our child-like stalk of innocents that reconnects us with the central resin of our innate humanity that knows truth and goodness. To see the world through a lens of youthful rapture is to see life for what it can be and to see for ourselves what we wish to become. In this beam of newly discovered ecstasy for life, we realize the splendor of love, life, and the unbounded beauty of the natural world.”
― Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

How? Recreation in harmony with wildlife.

Is it possible and How?

“Every trail can’t be all things to all people but all trails can play beneficial roles. Trails play roles in the economy, play roles in the environment and perhaps most importantly, play roles in our health.*” Trails have the capacity to provide connectivity, economic benefits, education potential, environmental interpretation, health, heritage, and recreation. Trails can also focus on just interpretive trails. Trails may be made solely for recreation without awareness of the environment. Those people focusing on the lack of Vitamin “N” in the urban population, may construct trails for education and health, and not focus on a wide variety of recreation. Then there are those trails which with planning and foresight have the capacity to combine many features for an audience of skiiers, classrooms of snowshoers, groups of fat bicycle riders, and nature enthusiasts who come to the forest to band birds. Trails invite people and increase the human footprint. Is it at all possible for trails to provide health benefits of recreation and to conserve the footprint of birds and wildlife at the same time?

Trails can be constructed to encircle biospheres, and trails can loop around and create length for an exercise workout. Ecosystems in the afforestation area vary widely. Prairie gives way to permanent class IV wetlands, in turn cycles to Aspen Parkland bluffs, which at the next turn reveals implanted and afforested trees. Native grasslands mix with modified grasslands. Native trees combine with afforested mature tree plantings. Shallow temporary floodplains flow with intermittent streams between marsh areas.

Abandoned roadways in the afforestation area formerly allowed motorized vehicle travel east and west. Newly created trails create greenways through the forest biome itself.

“‘Planning Trails with Wildlife in Mind’ helps trail planners and builders balance the benefits of creating trails with being stewards of nature and wildlife habitat.” How does one make a bicycle path appropriate for a semi-wilderness wildlife habitat? What are some guidelines for being aware of wildlife, aquatic areas, and environmental impacts and consequences? Can trails be designed in the winter months without an awareness of the spring, summer and fall biosphere? How can trails enrich greenways, and the wildlife, while still providing a recreational experience? Are there impacts of trails on the nesting site of deer families, and fawns? What is the view from the bird’s nest with an increase of trail users in a forest?

Is it possible that a greenway concept or trail design, that the flora and fauna of wetlands and woodlands can thrive alongside people in nature? What types of design considerations and awareness of the biodiversity are required? Trail and corridor planning has the capacity to provide ecologically sustainable trails for a city urban footprint. Trails can protect environmental resources, if the natural eco-system is evaluated, and considered.

However, that being said, trails can focus only on recreational aspects, and those benefits. Trails can be indeed fantastic ways to enjoy winter recreation. Once built, the same trails over the spring, summer and fall months, have opened up the wildlife habitat to people. There is no doubt about it, the winter recreation trails don’t disappear along with the snow melt.

Do these trails bring people into the environment with minimal environmental impact? What happens on a winter trail in the summer?  Do the trails provide the tourist with the capacity for educational, scenic or interpretive opportunity year round? Can all vegetation be linked with a greenway corridor, or are there species which do not thrive around a trail? Similarly what species of animals will make homes, reproduce, and live in the same habitat as trails? Can this be accomplished, or does it become an either or? Is it a choice to choose between trails and a variety of fauna, or can they exist together? Do trails include the biosphere of flora and fauna species and therefore enhance the environment?

How do challenging bicycling and hiking trails compare to a shorter interpretive or nature trail? Is the area only large enough for recreational trails, and the park should only be open in the winter, and close up for the other seasons? Can recreational winter trails, afford environmentally friendly trails during other seasons?

Trails dig deep into a woodland, when a trail transects through a forest what are the impacts on the woodland animals, and birds? Do botanists work alongside trail planners to know which areas are sensitive and which would thrive with trails?

Trails are amazing things, a well-designed trail has minimal devastation to the vegetation, are easy to hike, bicycle, ski and snowshoe.  However it may possibly be that protecting the vegetation, is not the sole responsibility when trail planning when providing a minimum impact onto an eco-system. Again, trails are truly amazing things, providing people with an opportunity to bicycle in nature, hike, showshoe, ski, or band birds. Alongside the vegetation, good trail planning will consider the seasons and the urban footprint all year round. If a winter ski trail is created in one area of a biome, will this impact where a deer gives birth to a fawn in the spring? When a winter trail loops through a forest, will that have a ripple effect on species of birds nesting over the summer?

Eco-tourism is wonderful. A healthy and active outdoor lifestyle is absolutely marvelous. Having the capacity to celebrate a semi-wilderness habitat in the city is remarkable. What is the way to make these concepts mutally inclusive? How can winter trail networks live in harmony with semi-wilderness wildlife habitats? This question begs the need to know what wildlife habitats exist, which species live where. Where do the nature enthusiasts band their birds? Where do the deers nest their fawns? If these questions are answered, the biosphere, is truly enhanced with trails, and the next generation of skiiers, snowshoers, hikers, and bicyclers will also be handed a glimpse of a deer, and the grandchildren of the bird-banders, will also be able to band birds alongside the same trails.  Wouldn’t that be fantastic if many generations of recreational enthusiasts, could have a grand time celebrating winter, and that their great grandchildren may also see a deer in a city forest?  Is it possible and how can it be accomplished? The question now is how?

BIBLIOGRAPHY
* Benefits of Trails Hike Ontario.

Trails, Bike and Hike: Inpsiring a Healthy Environment Upper Thams River Conservation Authority. Parks Recreation and Natural Areas.

National Trails Training Partnership Wildlife and environment impacts and benefits of Trails and Greenways.

Benefits of Trails | Rails to Trails

Enhancing the Environment with Trails and Greenways. Rails to Trails Conservancy.

Trails in Saskatchewan Provincial Parks

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Saskatoon City Police Support

One of the deep secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others.Lewis Carroll

In a nutshell, Stewards and Stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area seeking to get the appropriate services to direct and educate the public to be respectful of the diverse flora and fauna of woodlands, grasslands and wetlands – the afforestation area preserved in perpetuity.

It is very easy to enjoy a semi-wilderness wildlife habitat nestled in a mixed deciduous and evergreen forest such as usually only seen north of the provincial treeline. Here in our native and modified Aspen Parkland eco-system, and West Swale wetlands it is better if all users had an awareness and respect for the environment around them.

Quote by John L. Lonergan “Education not punishment is the solution. Education has a huge role to play to change things… Anybody that goes out and wrongs or damages another human being deserves to be punished. …You cannot allow people to go out and damage other people and injure other people or to rob from other people or to destroy other people’s property. That is not the point… The point is that once we look at the population and at the evidence; are there ways to reduce the number of people committing crime and if we can say yes to that we’ll automatically reduce the numbers of victims and it is far better to prevent people becoming victims of criminality rather than responding to it which we do. ” John L. Lonergan TedX Dublin. Sept 2014

Several points follow; put forward by Jeff Hehn, Ambassador of the Fatlanders Fatbike Brigade and the various stewards / stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

1) It is greatly appreciated the assistance being afforded by Air Support One and a request is humbly submitted for continued support until barriers are in place.

2) Better signage, awareness and education will allow police to act when called upon and hopefully less need for action. A defined knowledge of city land / park / open space / environmental bylaws or regulations which are extant if afforestation areas are owned by a/ land branch b/ parks department.

3) Response protocol is defined and understood – police know where to respond and how to get in (particularly if locked) To put into place education that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is totally owned by the city and totally annexed in 2005 along with afforestation area formerly named George Genereux Urban Regional Park

4) An education or neighbourhood watch program implemented addressing safety for users of the afforestation area who personally step up as citizens in regards to protective services needs.

5) Agreement from the Police Commission and letter of support that better signage and vehicles restrictions to the area are necessary and will reduce resources needed to enforce the bylaws and thereby save the city money. Agreement from police board that restricting access will reduce the need to have go out there – costs less to fix problem at the root than to try and deal with symptoms.

The users of the afforestation areas realize this is not solved by the police alone. Education is the key, education at the citizen level to increase awareness of the afforestation area preserved in perpetuity, education for all users to respect the flora and fauna of the eco-system, education in the form of signage and education in the form of vehicle restrictions to mitigate illegal trespass.

With education, everyone’s role at the afforestation area becomes easier. A safe, vibrant and active community life abounds, the environment benefits, time and money can be much better spent.

“I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life. I will play no part in this devastation of this land. I am destined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and of the generations of tomorrow.Let TAWAMHWE-pull together-be our motto ” Richard St. Barbe Baker”

The Board of Police Commissioners has forwarded comments to the Standing Policy Committee on Planning, Development and Community Services Department following consideration of your presentation dated April 20, 2017, to the Board regarding the above matter. The resolution from the Board, along with a copy of your presentation, will be considered by the Standing Policy Committee on Planning, Development and Community Services Department:

DATE: Monday, May 1, 2017

TIME: 9:00 a.m.

The present is full of opportunity. Never before in the history of the planet has mankind been given the privileges and opportunities that are at his disposal today. A great light has been raised and is penetrating the darkness of the world, but alas, too many with dust blinded eyes have yet to catch the vision. Some of us have . That is our privilege and our responsibility.
The fate of an individual or a nation will always be determined by the degree of his or its harmony with the forces and laws of Nature and the universe. Man is not alone in the universe but is surrounded by sources of power, harmony and knowledge.  The fullness of life depends upon man’s harmony with the totality of the natural cosmic laws. Our individual evolution is a job that has to be carried on day by day by each individual himself. It is a lifelong task.”Richard St. Barbe Baker

South West Sector Afforestation Addresses:
1/ Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (City of Saskatoon Urban Regional Park) Parts Section 22 and SW 23 township 36 range 6 west of the third meridian. (East of the CN overpass on SK Highway 7) SE 22 & SW 23-36-6 W3 under MVA conservation management.

2/ Un-named City of Saskatoon Afforestation Area. Part south of CN Chappell yards SE section 23-36-6-W3 preserved as afforestation area in perpetuity, under MVA conservation management- west of SW OLRA and east of COC.

3/ In 1960, part of NE 21-36-6 W3 (West of the CN overpass on SK Highway 7) was purchased by the City, planted in 1972, preserved as an afforestation area. Named in 1978-1979 George Genereux Park (Urban Regional Park), this namesake was removed at this afforestation area for use at a different city pocket park.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker
Pinterest richardstbarbeb

“From water and earth we came, and the future of mankind on this planet will be determined by respectful or disrespectful treatment of these basic elements.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Clean and Green!!

Let’s top last year’s record of 30,000 volunteer participants who came out to make Saskatoon beautiful!

Today is Earth day! Do you part, now this minute to save our planet! Sign up for the Saskatoon Meewasin Valley Authority River Bank clean up which is going on between  Saturday April 22, 2017 through to Friday May 19, 2017.  Then go out with your garbage bags to help clean up!  Bring to life Saskatchewan’s Motto  “From many peoples strength”.  is Multis E Gentibus Vires,

The South West Off Leash Recreation Area
is seeking your help April 29, 2017 10:00 a.m. to noon!!!Richard St. Barbe Baker, himself, adopted the motto the African word Twahamwe, meaning “pull together”.  Let’s all “pull together” and make an impact where you are outside today, Earth Day, and every day.  See you later, today!  😉

If you are out enjoying the park today, grab a few garbage bags from home before you leave your house, throw on a pair of gardening gloves, and as you walk outside, help with the clean up!  You will be glad you did.  Register your group or individual clean up online.  You can add in a location you feel passionate about, or request a location that needs attention.  Anytime you walk between today and  May 19, 2017 come help out, it is truly an amazing difference.

“Thank you to Loraas for placing garbage and recycling bins at 6 locations in the valley (Meewasin Park North, The Weir, Meewasin Valley Centre, Rotary Park Parking Lot, Diefenbaker Park, and south of the Northeast Swale). And thank you to the City of Saskatoon who will again provide pick up of collected garbage by community groups.

Corporate sponsors or groups wanting to be assigned to clean a specific are of the valley should contact Andrew Whiting at Meewasin. Those wanting to be assigned an area to clean should also contact Andrew Whiting awhiting@meewasin.com or 306-665-6887. ” … For more information – 2017 Meewasin Annual Clean Up Campaign

Help to maintain the homes of animals in Saskatoon today!

  Remediate your drinking water, now!

Let’s live in harmony with nature, and the river valley system.

Great Canadian Shoreline Clean up –

The South Saskatchewan River is no doubt a fantastic ecological asset, with incredible bio-diversity, and an integral link with our local economy. River Clean UP

Millions of tons of trash unfortunately find their way to our nation’s rivers, marshes and streams every year. This is not only visual pollution it contaminates your drinking water, and poses risks to the amazing flora and fauna.

Take before and after pictures! Track the volunteer progress along the river, and post them to facebook
Clean up pictures and Saskatoon clean ups

Earth Day Canada SUPPORT THE MOVEMENT TO BRING BACK ADVENTURE PLAYGROUNDS!

Earth Day cleaning up our planet!

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’” wrote Richard St Barbe Baker in his book, The New Earth Charter.

Great Canadian Shoreline Clean Up Poster RE Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area clean up. SAskatoon, SK, CA
Great Canadian Shoreline Clean Up Poster RE Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area clean up. SAskatoon, SK, CA
Great Canadian Shoreline Clean Up Poster RE Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area clean up. SAskatoon, SK, CA
Great Canadian Shoreline Clean Up Poster RE Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area clean up. SAskatoon, SK, CA

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Off Leash Dog Park Valley Road Saskatoon!
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Saskatoon Nature Society

Wildlife Montage. Red Winged Blackbird, White Tailed Deer Fawn, Garter Snake, JackRabbit, Mallard Ducklings, Black Crowned Night Heron
Wildlife Montage. Red Winged Blackbird, White Tailed Deer Fawn, Garter Snake, JackRabbit, Mallard Ducklings, Black Crowned Night Heron

The Saskatoon Nature Society, and the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area are very proud that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is included in the new edition of their book, “Nature and Viewing Sites In and Around Saskatoon”. The public awareness of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, Saskatoon’s Best Kept Secret, is invaluable, and is currently the new direction forward being adopted by the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

“The Saskatoon Nature Society, a charitable organization founded in 1955, brings together those interested in the natural world. Our objective is to promote the appreciation of nature and encourage a deeper knowledge of it through observation and sharing of experience.

Our society supports nature conservation projects and is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats.The SNS is affiliated with Nature Saskatchewan and Nature Canada”SNS

A new direction has come forward for the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area; to tell the story of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area at the citizen level. Getting the story out there looks to embrace the single key concept which came forward time and time again during the meeting from all users and all stakeholders; the need to respect the Afforestation Area. 


In this regards, the Saskatoon Nature Society was way ahead in letting Saskatoon know about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area at the citizen level.  For this, the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area are deeply thankful and grateful.  It is good to know that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, an afforestation area preserved in perpetuity in 1972, is no longer an outlier nor secret, but is well and truly considered a nature and viewing site of some regard in Saskatoon.  If you have never had the chance to view the new edition of their book, “Nature and Viewing Sites In and Around Saskatoon” please do check it out, indeed.

 As the Persian Seer of the Bahai said:
‘This is the hour for the coming together, the Sons of Men.
That the Earth will become indeed a Garden of Paradise.”

I believe that this generation will either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilized world or it will be the first to have a vision, a daring and a greatness to say:

“I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life. I will play no part in this devastation of this land. I am destined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and of the generations of tomorrow.

Let TAWAMHWE-pull together-be our motto and …I pray that I may be just to the Earth below my feet, to my neighbour by my side and to the light which comes from above and within, and this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy for my having lived in it. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilized world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
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Man of Trees winter trail network

How can we encourage more people to get outside, get active and get together over the winter months in Saskatoon?~Eric Westberg COS

In 2015, members of the Fatlanders FatTire Brigade (FFTB) discover the Richard St. Barbe Baker afforestation area and start to use existing trails for winter recreational snow biking. Through January to March 2016 the (FFTB) groom trails using showshoes to gauge the effectiveness of this method of making trails. The FFTB is quite enthusiastic, and wish to pursue a formal trail network in this flat land area. Several bicycle enthusiasts prefer these trails over and above the technical trails in existence along the riverbank.

FFTB submits proposal to the City of Saskatoon (COS) Open Spaces Consultants for discussion of a “Man of Trees“ winter trail network. It is noticed by the FFTB that the City of Saskatoon initiates a Winter City Strategies Initiative for the City of Saskatoon. The City of Saskatoon is currently in growing Winter City YXE and they are in the planning and development stage “to make winter in our city great!” Jeff Hehn, ambassador for the FFTB, brings to the city the FFTB proposal to embrace a winter strategy that could increase outdoor winter recreation.

The FFTB proposal suggests that the groomed winter trail network would encourage fat biking, cross-country skiing, skijourning, snow shoeing, horse back riding, winter hiking, and sliding snowshoeing recreational activities.

The “Man of the Trees” trail network, is stated to have the potential to improve winter tourism amenities for the City of Saskatoon in this proposal. An emerging recreational activity known as fat biking is on the rise. Fat bikes are specialized for winter biking and riding upon snow. Snowshoeing, cross country skiing, slide snowshoeing, skijoring, hiking, and horseback riding all benefit from the grooming of a winter trail network.

As part of this winter tail network, it is imperative that motorized vehicles do not have egress to the park, as vehicles undo the work done by those actively engaged in grooming the paths. The FFTB have been in this way: actively engaged as stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area while at the same time advocating for the winter trail network.

Further to the newly installed barriers, the FFTB continue to raise money for the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Trust Fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)” to fully support the erection of gates and barriers at any areas where vehicles may enter the afforestation area. With motorized vehicles, thus restricted, there is no doubt that it is very much easier to create trails to fat bicycle in the afforestation area, and keep them well groomed.

If you are ever out in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and wonder about the newly created trails they have been the passion of Jeff Hehn and the Fatbike Fatlanders Brigade.  Consider this, is the man of the trails network an an outlier in regards to the environment issues being an observation point that is distant from other environmental observations  Or is the man of the trails network a means to observe and appreciate the flora and fauna with a healthy respect for their habitat and provides a means of proceeding with respect through the afforestation area with the least amount of impact on the semi-wilderness wildlife habitat.

Meetings have resulted in a sharing of  information and an increase of awareness between the viewpoints of  these diverse stakeholders, who share the mutual goals and desires in regards to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area to mitigate illegal trespass and the appreciation and respect of the afforestation area.

It is fantastic that the City of Saskatoon recognizes and supports two initiatives for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area; the “strategic goal of quality of life” and the “strategic goal of environmental leadership.”

The City of Saskatoon is growing, expected to reach 250,000 by 2025 and 380,000 by 2035.  It is truly an honour to know that the City of Saskatoon takes the biodiversity of this ecological area seriously.  The various stakeholders have been in contact with the City along the way regarding both the environment as well as the FatLanders Fattire Brigade pitched the Winter Trail Network – a Winter City YXE proposal.  As the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is across Cedar Villa road from Chappell Marsh Conservation Area, it is fitting and fantastic that the herds of deer, waterfowl, small mammals and amphibians are considered alongside the wetlands, native and modified woodlands and grasslands when creating human plans and recreation activities in the home and habitat of the native wildlife.

Respect of the afforestation area coupled with a due consideration of the semi-wilderness wildlife habitat, means this generation and many future generations can also enjoy and take part in various recreational capacities the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  Without trails, humans just cannot interact with nature, however with too many trails and other forms of human intervention, nature just simply cannot interact with humans.  The wise deliberation on the ecological footprint is a wonderful recommendation at the outset of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area human development process at a time when the human footprint in the afforestation area increases exponentially.  With forethought now as to wise and considerate placement of trails and human activities in a semi-wilderness wildlife habitat, it just may be that humans and nature can peacefully co-exist now and in the future.  Wouldn’t it be a fantastic experience as it is today, that in 2035 as well, when the city reaches a population of 380,000 grandchildren and great grandchildren can see waterfowl, deer, amphibians and other wildlife within the city limits at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area without the only urban recourse of going to a zoo?  Don’t jump to the wrong conclusion here, zoos are fantastic, however, don’t you agree it is a treasure to have a preserved afforestation area affording a natural environment for human activities alongside the urban zoo.  Respect of the afforestation area coupled with a due consideration of the semi-wilderness wildlife habitat, means this generation and many future generations can also enjoy and take part in various recreational opportunities within a semi-wilderness wildlife habitat at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

…today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Sidenote:
As Richard St. Barbe Baker had once the nick name “Man of the Trees” this trail network, is thus named by the FFTB. The multi-use trail network is of course open and available to those who are not men.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Giles, David. City of Saskatoon offering free winter activities Global News.


Feeling dreary about winter? City of Saskatoon trying to change that
New strategy designed to improve winter life, economy, accessibility, culture
CBC news January 2017

Things to do in Winter in Saskatoon. Tourism Saskatoon

WinterCityYXE: Saskatoon’s Winter City Strategy City of Saskatoon

Winte City Strategy Breakfast March 15, 2017

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker
Pinterest richardstbarbeb