Elm Trees and Pruning

Do you have some Elm trees you wish to prune on city and area properties, prune them now! Remember pruning or chopping down trees in a City of Saskatoon park is covered under the City of Saskatoon urban tree policy – so you must contact the City of Saskatoon.

The elm pruning ban begins April 1st, and is in effect until August 31st- that is the time period when it is illegal to prune Elm trees on your property

The Elm bark beetle is the most active during these warmer months April 1-August 31. The Elm Bark Beetles lead to the spread of Dutch Elm disease and are attracted to the injuries in the Elm trees such as those caused by pruning.

Both American Elm and Siberian Elm are susceptible to Dutch Elm Disease, which actually is a fungal virus carried around on the backs of the Elm Bark Beetle.

To date, there has been found no way to cure the pandemic of Dutch Elm disease. To prevent it from spreading, and taking out this beautiful leafy American Elm tree canopy across Saskatchewan, trees should be removed immediately and disposed of by choosing from burning, burial or take the branches to the landfill for disposal there.

Never, ever break the law and store or transport Elm for firewood or for any other reason. Whatever you do, do not throw or discard Elm into any forested area, such as Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area or George Genereux Park. These greenspaces have a plethora of elm, which add to the beauty of the green space area. The wood from firewood or pruned branches can harbor the Elm bark beetle, which is how the Dutch Elm disease can spread so quickly from tree to tree, city to city, province to province. and ravage and decimate our enjoyment of forests and trees.

Pay attention after Easter, for as the trees are supposed to be greening up, pay attention to the Elm appearance around you. Those trees that have been infected by Dutch Elm disease, will show leaves turning yellow, then curl and brown in the spring. This sign of “flagging” will start at the top of the Elm tree in the crown, and continue until the until the autumn colours appear. 

The City of Saskatoon webpages say; “Residents who start to notice any of these symptoms, are encouraged to complete the online form below or call Urban Biological Services at 306-975-2890.

Therefore, at your home or farm, please trim your Elm trees before April 1st. Afterwards do NOT store Elm wood on your property, or on anyone else’s property, and not in the afforestation areas. Take your pruned branches, and trimmings straight to the landfill.

Tree Care SOS Trees Coalition Formerly SOS Elms

City of Saskatoon Dutch Elm Disease

Province of Saskatchewan Dutch Elm Disease

Elm trees are a valuable part of our ecosystem. “Seeds are an important source of food for birds and mammals, with large “mast” seeds being especially valued by wildlife” source Besides the birds eating elm seeds and the leaves provide nutrition and food for the caterpillars of many moths. There are species of butterflies and moths which have declined dramatically since the spread of Dutch elm disease. It is a ripple effect, we must all do our part to protect species at risk, when DED is spread so much faster with the aid of vehicle transporting pruned branches and firewood and not disposing of same appropriately.

The International Day of Forests proclaimed by the United Nations is March 21. How will you celebrate this auspicious occasion?

 “We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Donations can be made through Paypal, Canada Helps, Contact Donate A Car Canada, SARCAN Drop & Go 106100594 for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Compost DED Education

The City of Saskatoon is acting on the instances of Dutch Elm Disease found in the city! An informational pamphlet about Dutch Elm Disease DED will be given to those who arrive at the compost depot with elm over the summer 2021 months! The pamphlet will illustrate the dangers to the city urban forest if elm is disposed of incorrectly, and why the guidelines are in place to prevent a pandemic from sweeping through the elms in the city. Where we, as humans, can wear facemasks as protection for the COVID-19 pandemic, the Elm trees are not quite so lucky. The Elm trees rely on humans!

The Elm bark beetle passes through the winter inside the Elm as larva and as an adult. There is no way to protect the Elms against the fungus, though birds and other insects may destroy Elm bark beetles at their various life cycles from egg to larva to beetle. Very low winter temperatures kill many Elm bark beetles. The galleries holding the beetle eggs may be so small with the diseased wood (the food of the larva) that not all eggs may develop into full grown beetles. The best way to control the spread of DED is to remove all trees or parts of trees which may become homes to the Elm Bark Beetle, its eggs and larva. Dutch elm disease (DED) is caused by Ophiostoma ulmi – a member of the sac fungi (Ascomycota) – affecting elm trees, and is spread by elm bark beetles.

The Saskatoon StarPhoenix reported City finds more than 13 tonnes of improperly stored elm wood…Since it confirmed a case of Dutch elm disease in mid-September, the city issued 71 infraction notices, 46 of which contained elm firewood. In light of the Dutch Elm Disease found in the City of Saskatoon and the follow up by the City of Saskatoon staff to discover if any Elm firewood had been stored within city limits, the city is taking action at the drop off compost depots. All persons using the drop off compost depots to recycle their leaf cuttings, pruned branches and logs will still be directed that Elm must be disposed of at the city landfill. Additionally the informational pamphlet will help the Elm that is to be discarded, actually and really is thrown into the city landfill.

A note! Please pay attention to your community association neighbourhood newsletters. They announce when the community association will have a Loraas bin in your neighbourhood in the spring and/or the fall season.

“From April 1 to August 31 every year, it is illegal to prune elm trees in Saskatchewan.” The City of Saskatoon post information each year about when to prune Elm Trees (when the Elm Beetle is the least active). To identify if an Elm may be disease and infected with the fungus, please consult City of Saskatoon Tree Diseases and Pests.

As a citizen scientist there are steps you can take!

  • Do not store Elm firewood, or any Elm cuttings at all
  • Only prune Elm trees between August 31 to March 31
  • Help to identify infected trees The Government of Saskatchewan says that “DED testing is done free of charge for Saskatchewan residents”
  • Learn more about Dutch Elm Disease as it is a fungus which affects the trees. The fungus is carried from Elm tree to Elm tree by three species of Elm Bark Beetles. The fungus is carried from place to place by people transporting cut Elm or storing cut Elm.
  • Share the facebook STOP elm disease in the afforestation areas fund raiser!

Help support this fundraiser to STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic from entering the afforestation areas!

Always dispose of any elm wood at the City Landfill

The fundraiser will go towards vehicle mitigation barriers and park identification signage to STOP illegal motorized trespass and illegal dumping!

Please SHARE this fundraiser, taking care of trees is vitally important in this era of climate change! Protect our elms! LOOK at the George Genereux Clean UP Results!!! Please share the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. [a non profit charity] fundraiser. You can get a charitable receipt By donating to the STOP Dutch Elm Disease fundraiser, you may receive as much as 53% of the amount you donated back at tax-time.

Dutch Elm Disease can be fatal to the elm trees in the afforestation areas. SOS Trees Coalition also deals with Dutch Elm Disease, as they started out under the name of SOS Elms Coalition.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Elm Trees are Beautiful

The Province of Saskatchewan has guidelines for Dutch Elm Disease as does the Government of Canada. Natural Resources Canada has a Dutch Elm Disease fact sheet. Agriculture and Agrifood Canada also has agricultural practices and agroforestry advice. The City of Saskatoon takes Dutch Elm Disease seriously, and for this reason, will not accept Elm at the compost areas in the city. “Also in accordance with the City’s DED Response Plan, inspectors will follow up and search for stored firewood in yards located in Montgomery, Fairhaven, Meadowgreen and the South Industrial area in an effort to pinpoint a source.”

Please be aware that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux have some magnificent and beautiful elm trees. Please follow guidelines for pruning, and please dispose of any elm leaves and branches in bags for the landfill. Thanks very much

Facebook Fundraiser. STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic  from entering the afforestation areas! Help protect this City of Saskatoon Urban Regional Park!

Help support this fundraiser to STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic from entering the afforestation areas! The fundraiser will go towards vehicle mitigation barriers and park identification signage to STOP illegal motorized trespass and illegal dumping! Please SHARE this fundraiser, taking care of trees is vitally important in this era of climate change! Protect our elms! LOOK at the George Genereux Clean UP Results!!! Please share the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. [a non profit charity] fundraiser. You can get a charitable receipt By donating to the STOP Dutch Elm Disease fundraiser, you may receive as much as 53% of the amount you donated back at tax-time.

https://www.facebook.com/donate/246565156761430/

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Watch for flagging and staining

Protect Your Elm Trees:

Don’t Prune From April 1 to August 31

The Elm Bark Beetles, Hylurgopinus rufipes (Eichhoff), shows an attack as red sawdust appears on the bark of the elm tree indicating the presence of small round holes where the beetles enter.  Another sign of Dutch Elm disease occurs in July, “Flagging” manifests as yellow, curling leaves and wilting foliage, and defoliation in the crown of the tree.  These little insects may carry the Dutch elm disease from a diseased tree to a healthy one.  “Staining “ will show evidence of red streaks through the sapwood in infected twigs.  These little beetles can overwinter in the outer bark of the living elm, or survives as larvae inside the bark of a dead elm. “Dutch elm disease is a fungal disease that blocks trees’ water systems, killing them within one to two years.” Star Phoenix  

Elm bark beetles are attracted to weak, and sickly trees.  “Dying branches on an elm increase the chances that a beetle, possibly carrying the DED fungus, will make its way to  your tree.”  Fact Sheet # 3 Give your elm trees a healthy foundation with watering and retaining leaves for fertilizer at the base of the tree.

“The most effective management strategy for the elm bark beetle is to deprive it of its breeding habitat. This involves keeping elm trees healthy and removing dead and dying branches. It is necessary to dispose of any branches or wood from a fallen elm tree and either remove the stump or render it uninhabitable. Under no circumstances should elm wood be left lying around or stored for firewood or other purposes.” City of Saskatoon

“If someone brought in infected wood that had the beetle in the wood, that beetle would fly over top of a healthy tree and start to go into that healthy tree spreading the disease.” Michelle Chartier, Superintendent of Urban Forestry and Pest Management. CBC News

Tree banding is a preventative measure (so that the species which travels down the trunk of the tree to overwinter under the bark at the base of a live elm cannot make its downward journey.  For this method to be effective, the band must be placed on the Elm tree by late September, and should stay on the tree until spring), similar to the practice applied for cankerworms.

American elm Ulmus americana is the primary host tree for the native elm bark beetle Hylurgopinus rufipes. Siberian elm Ulmus laciniata is the native host tree species for the Smaller European elm bark beetle Scolytus multistriatus in the United States.
“After the beetle feeds in a tree infected with Dutch Elm Disease, the fungus spores attach to the back of the beetle, causing it to infect the next healthy trees.

An elm tree in Regina had to be removed last year due to DED and the city has had to remove 94 trees since the disease was first detected in 1981.”

“Saskatoon recorded its first case of DED in July 2015.“Global News

In the afforestation area, and across Saskatchewan, an Elm tree pruning ban is in effect between April 1 to August 31.  The elm beetles are the most active during these months, and pruning the Elm tree during this time frame will increase the chance of infection.  The newly created cut attracts the elm beetles.

Do not store, transport or use Elm Wood as in firewood or for other purposes.  Report any Elm trees with signs of elm beetle distress to 306-975-2890.  Only dispose of elm wood at the City of Saskatoon Landfill and never ever at a compost site.

“SOS Elms Coalition is concerned about the health of Saskatchewan’s community tree populations, in particular the threat of Dutch Elm Disease.”

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

SOS Elms Coalition Speaks Out

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

SOS Elms Coalition Speaks out

SOS Elms Coalition came to fruition with a passion to save Elm trees across the province of Saskatchewan  during the rampage of Dutch Elm Disease DED in North America. Keeping abreast of the progression of the disease and forestry practices, SOS Elms was on top of the situation when the provincial Dutch Elm Disease program was cut from the budget in 2010. In lieu of the program, individual towns, municipalities and cities are taking responsibility upon themselves of educating the public in their area about DED and best conservation practices.

Communities established a regional urban forestry community group or NGO, and in Saskatoon, it is the SOS Elms Coalition providing that support for the city of Saskatoon. These local foresters have had a keen eye out for Dutch Elm Disease, and work together with the City of Saskatoon Urban Forestry Program, and so are able to implement the Dutch Elm Disease DED response plan, so that any infected trees in Saskatoon with DED would not promote a city wide infestation.

“Urban forests in Canada have been dominated by three themes: superficial support by the provincial and federal governments, individuals’ commitment to developing urban forests of excellence, and awareness and action fueled by natural disaster….Cities like Saskatoon, Regina and Moose Jaw saw urban forests created largely with elm due to the limited number of species choice. In the 2000’s greater efforts were expended to diversify these forests. Regina’s Wascana Centre has had a lead role in maintaining tree cover in the prairie city as has SOS Elms in Saskatoon.”~Rosen

“The arrival of Dutch elm disease in the early 1960’s virtually wiped out the American elm (Ulmus americana L.) the street tree of choice in Canada’s cities. From this an urban forestry movement was born including the creation of a number of organizations – from community groups such as SOS Elms”~Rosen-Kenney

SOS Elms Coalition, reached out to the public for unique and spectacular trees of Saskatoon, and published a full colour booklet of these sites. These large tree centenarians grace Saskatoon’s Urban Forest. As an example of some of the trees presented are a Ginkgo Biloba, Limber Pine, Prairie Silk Honey Locust, Black Walnut and Northern Pin Oak grow against all odds in the City of Saskatoon, rare and unique species, indeed.

SOS Elms Coalition sets up conference displays, initiates programs for schools, and assists in community projects bringing to the Saskatoon community an awareness of urban forests, environmental issues and the precautions to mitigate the spread of Dutch Elm Disease.

Members of the SOS Elms Coalition were at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Clean UP in the summer of 2016. Robert White, of SOS Elms Coalition, was the official photographer at the clean up.

As was the case in 1972, Manchurian Elm, and American Elm were afforested, along with hardy drought resistant tree species such as Colorado Blue Spruce, Balsam-poplar, Scotch Pine, Caragana.  If Green Ash, Manitoba Maple or Willow were planted, there was not a large survival rate of these in the afforestation area.  Native prairie Trembling Aspen Groves are mixed within the afforested woodlands. SOS Elms members recognizing the various locations of Elms in this urban regional park will truly ensure best conservation practices.

SOS Elms placed the City Urban Forest ~ the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ~ in the December 2016 SOS Elms Coalition newsletter

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

The power of citizen action
by Robert White
“For 37 years, the 660 acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (RSBBAA)
in southwest Saskatoon (see map) was mostly neglected even though proclaimed by City Council in 1979 as an “urban regional park” and a “forest in perpetuity”. The park began in 1960 with a visionary idea of City planners” …

…to read more about the RSBBAA in the SOS Elms newsletter click here (pdf)

To learn more about the SOS Elms Coalition or to join this Saskatoon Urban Forestry Organisation, see their Webpage; SOS Elms Coalition Welcome.

The present is full of opportunity. Never before in the history of the planet has mankind been given the privileges and opportunities that are at his disposal today. A great light has been raised and is penetrating the darkness of the world, but alas,
too many with dust blinded eyes have yet to catch the vision. Some of us have. That is our privilege and our responsibility.~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

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Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – year
Membership with donation : $20.00 CAD – monthly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

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You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

 

Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.~Albert Einstein

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’” ~ Richard St Barbe Baker

“When tree cover is destroyed it is a threat to both man and the creatures. The protection of world wildlife was in the vanguard of the conservation movement and it was very soon recognised that it was not possible to protect the wild animals and the threatened species without protecting their tree-cover habitat because they, like ourselves, need an adequate supply of oxygen, the very breath of life. The main source of oxygen is the evergreen tropical forests. ” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

@LoraxYXE Twitter.

13th Annual Environmental Activism Awards. Saskatchewan Eco Network. Spring 2015. Paddy Tutty, Director SOS Elms.

Canadian Urban Network Prairies Region Update

Eco-Friendly Sask. Honouring Saskatoon’s Trees. SOS Elms Coalition Urban Forestry Mascot in Saskatoon. Lorax YXE who speaks “for the trees for the trees have no tongues.” EcoFriendly Slide Presentation.

Heather Cline – URBAN FOREST
Reception: Saturday, June 18, 2:00pm
June 18 – July 14 The Gallery / Art Placement

Just a reminder, we have some pretty cool trees growing at innovation place. The Scene. April 2015

Towns will have to monitor elm trees:Sask CBC News March 31, 2010

Marjan, Richard. Co-president of SOS Elms Richard Kerbes with a giant cottonwood in the 200 block of Eighth Street East in Saskatoon on August 6, 2014. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. December 4, 2014.

Modjeski, Morgan. Saskatoon Lorax gives local trees and forestry a voice on twitter. Metro Publishing News.

Re-Imagining Saskatoon towards Sustainability 2015 Slideshow. EcoFriendly Saskatchewan. Dec. 28, 2015.

Rosen, Michael, Trees Canada. A Brief Historical Perspective of Urban Forests in Canada. As published in Histoires Forestieres du Quebec, HIver 2015, Vol 7, No 1 Pages 27-32.

Rosen, M.R. and W.A. Kenney. Urban Forestry Trends in Canada. 0752-B1

SOS Elms News 2016 Deecember No. 30

Williams, Sara. A Celebration of Saskatoon’s Trees. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. March 11, 2016

Williams, Sara. Trees, Trees, Trees Garden Bhat. BAttlefords News-Optimist. March 5, 2016.

 

For more information

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – year
Membership with donation : $20.00 CAD – monthly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD
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