International Happiness Day

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

International Happiness Day March 2, 2017

 

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Each day is a little life. Celebrate this International Day of Happiness at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and wrap yourself in the ever-unfolding happiness which Richard St. Barbe Baker himself speaks of. Jiggle with laughter as the joy permeates your whole being.

Our climate is so happy, that even in the worst months of the year, “calm mornings of sunshine visit us at times, appearing like glimpses of departed spring amid the wilderness of wet and windy days that lead to winter. It is pleasant, when these interludes of silver light occur, to stride into the woods and see how wonderful are all the colors of decay. Overhead, the elms and poplars hang their wealth of golden leaves.In the hedges pale snow berries and scarlet hips are wreathed with golden rod and here, like knots of rosy buds, on delicate frail twigs. No face welcomed us but the fine fantastic sprays of free and happy evergreen trees, waving one above another in their ancient home. Underneath lie fallen leaves, and the tall grass prairie rises to our knees as we thread the forest paths. Nature, though it be end autumn, is ever in her spring, where the moss-grown and decaying trees are not old, but seem to enjoy a perpetual youth; and blissful, innocent Nature, like a serene infant, is too happy to make a noise, except by a few tinkling, lisping birds and trickling rills?”

“Happy are they that findeth wisdom,
And the man that getteth understanding:
For the merchandise of it is better than silver,
And the gain thereof than fine gold.
She is more precious than rubies:
And all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her.
Length of days is in her right hand,
And in her left hand riches and honor.
Her ways are ways of pleasantness,
And all her paths are peace.”~Proverbs of Solomon

“I am a part of all that I have seen.”—Alfred Lord Tennyson

Laughter, is truly, the best medicine.  Go out into nature, celebrate returning to your roots, and be happy, and healthy.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

“I believe that if children fall in love with wildlife they will grow up wanting to protect it.”
― Imogen Taylor

. We have a motto in the Men of the Trees. TWAHAMWE. It is an African word meaning ‘pull together’ and I pass this on to all those concerned with conservation in this country. I would like to call you to silence for a moment with the words of Mathew Arnold:
“Calm soul of all things, make it mine,
To feel amidst the City ‘s jar
That there abides a peace of thine
Men did not make and cannot mar
~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 


“Be gentle – gentle – gentle with the tree,….Put your hands like this to bless it…I want you to feel your love going out from your fingertips to the …[tree], and, you know, this will help it grow, make it happy…We love to be blessed don’t we? And the trees love to be blessed. ..” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker /strong>

“He that planteth a tree is a Servant of God
He provideth a Kindness, for many generations
and faces he hath not seen shall bless him.
Who so walketh in solitude, And inhabiteth the wood,
Choosing light, wave, rock and bird,
Before the money-loving herd,
Unto that forester· shall pass,
From these companions, power and grace.
Woodnotes,” Emerson

A single tree, a forest assembly

How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest

 

A couple of proposed symbols for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – One a stylized tree, the other the same tree symbolizing the diversity of the forest, embraced by the RSBBAA community and the blue of the wetlands and sky.

This symbol comes to represent the dreams of the users of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (RSBBAA).  The RSBBAA has proven to be a site which over and over again draws people together, and unites diverse groups and areas.

The RSBBAA, itself is composed of two sections, east and west.

The afforestation area is comprised of two major tree plantings both coniferous trees in the shape of Scotch Pine, and Colorado Blue Spruce, along with deciduous trees.  Those deciduous trees planted in 1972-1973 included drought resistant and hardy trees such as American Elm, Siberian Elm, Black Poplar, and Caragana.

Within the RSBBAA,  selection of tree species also embraced diversity.  Trees were chosen for varieties of soil type, slow or rapid growers, long lived or short lived trees, light demanding or shade bearing.

RSBBAA not only has an area of prairie which was afforested – a forest brought into being where there was none before- but it also has large 50 foot areas of fescue grasslands left as fire breaks within the afforested area, providing two ecosystems together in one area.  Together at the RSBBAA, native Trembling Aspen groves, and prairie shrubs have joined with the planted afforestation area creating spectacular scenic visions.

There is yet another embracing of two major ecosystems, the wooded area is dissected by the West Swale wetlands, and three large paririe potholes make homes for the Ruddy Ducks, Mallards, Geese, Muskrats, and a number of other wetlands birds and animals, thriving  alongside the woodlands animals – jackrabbits, white tail deer, porcupine, and mule deer, etc.

However there is also another embracing outside of the wildlife corridor habitat – the RSBBAA is situated on the border zone of the City of Saskatoon and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park #344.  At this south west border of the City of Saskatoon, the Montgomery Place Community Association have become stewards of the RSBBAA, and completed a clean up in the spring of 2015 to protect the environment.  At the border of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park #344 is the hamlet of Cedar Villa Estates.  The community members have also been for the past number of years, “Stewards for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area” and besides enjoying walks in the woodlands, they keep an eye on the forest, protecting it.  They also effected a clean up in another area of the RSBBAA in the spring of 2014.  Change in the RSBBAA begins with action.  It is with actions such as these, that a ripple effect is created which will leads to preventing trash build up in this urban regional park.

And so there is yet another joining of two besides the City of Saskatoon residents who have come to love and embrace the beauty and splendour of the RSBBAA, there are also the rural residents from the neighbouring Rural Municipality of Corman Park #344 who have also a deep wish that the RSBBAA can reach its full potential as a spectacular wooded area to enjoy.

Again- another coming together of two groups is presented in the RSBBAA logo, the many committees and personnel within Meewasin Valley Authority (MVA)and the several departments of the City of Saskatoon are working towards a vision for the RSBBAA.  These two entities have a proven track record for considering a wide variety of potentialities, recreational, economic and environmental  among a very few.  The city and the MVA look towards the current needs from a variety of inputs, embrace past directions for what works, and have long range sustainable projected growth plans for the future.

However, this does not end here, the RSBBAA represents both the past the the present embracing the future.  A vision for a green belt for Saskatoon in 1960.  This starts with Bert Wellman, Saskatoon Planning Department, who walked around Saskatoon’s perimeter choosing high spots of land for scenic beauty.  Together with City Planner Bill Graham they worked on parkways and planted trees for the 1960 Circle Drive Parkway at these sites.  Alfred Henry Browne “Man of the Trees” city Parks Superintendent – “The Man Who Made Saskatoon Beautiful” also had a vision for Saskatoon – planting over 30,000 trees in the city. Wyndham Winkler Ashley local horticulturist and founder of the parks board advocated trees, and dispersed tree seedlings.  They all envisioned a green city.   RSBBAA brings together these visionaries of 1960 with the planners and designers at City Hall of the current era.

But again, the RSBBAA continues on, bringing together community that have a love and passion for RSBBAA.  The Honourable Pat Lorje, councilor for ward 2 has been bringing direction to the many diverse interest groups of the RSBBAA.  Pat Lorje, with great wisdom and diplomacy has been able to steer the ship, and bring such a wide variety of people interests and user group skill sets together to chart a course upon which everyone can sail.  By taking into account and remembering the needs and passions from the growing Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area community, Pat Lorje, keeps the RSBBAA ship from sinking, and keeps everyone’s head above water.  For the diverse users and groups who are taking part in the RSBBAA discussions, having such pilot in the ship is a wise and invaluable asset to have to stay the course, and not get bogged down and mired in the mud.

So this symbol represents the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.  The symbol has within it a heart which is pointing upwards in direction, moving forward in a positive way.  The RSBBA has become itself, a symbol brings together the users and groups who have embraced the afforestation area and its decided beauty. Country and city, neighbourhood and employment sector, nature lovers and sports enthusiasts, wetlands and forest, native plants and afforested trees all come together to make the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area a vision for many of a dream come true.  While the city grows towards half a million people by 2023, it is reassuring to know that such a forest is nestled within the boundaries of Saskatoon – a place  which is enjoyed by a wide and diverse range of users and user groups.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree.  Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves.  How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker
White_tailed_deer_Nebraska

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $20.00 CAD -monthly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

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