Richard St. Barbe Baker | Landscapes Paysages

“During my time in Saskatchewan,
I felt closer than ever to this
extraordinary man.”

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Camilla Allen. The Man of the Trees. Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

In the Canadian Association of Landscape Architects periodical “Landscapes Paysages” invention, vol 19, no 4 is found the article written by the University of Sheffield student, Camilla Allen about Richard St. Barbe Baker.  As Allen states, “During my time in Saskatchewan, I felt closer than ever to this extraordinary man” and she expounds upon Baker’s devotion to his work, to trees around the world.

 

During Allen’s visit to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, she had the opportunity to visit the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker homestead site near Beaver Creek. Allen spent time at the Meewasin Valley Authority Centre perusing the interpretive centre display, and delved into the Richard St. Barbe Baker Fonds at the University of Saskatchewan Library Special Collections and Archives. Allen had the good fortune of meeting both Paul Hanley, best selling author of “Eleven” and former Environmental Columnist for the Saskatoon Star Phoenix and Robert White,  both of whom knew Richard St. Barbe Baker  personally and knew him as St Barbe, a good friend.

Wishing Allen the best of success with her thesis, the subject of which is Richard St. Barbe Baker, founder of the International Tree Foundation in the year 1924

A man, to succeed, must possess the necessary equanimity of temperament to conceive an idea, the capacity to form it into some tangible shape, the ingenuity to put it into practical operation, the ability to favorably impress others with its merits, and the power of will that is absolutely necessary to force it to success.Thomas A. Scott

Thank you to Verity Moore-Wright from the Meewasin Valley Authority in regards to notification about this article appearing in the periodical “Landscapes Paysages”

we wait for the sunrise of our awakening to the realisation of our kinship with the earth and all living things.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven. And learn tranquility.
” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

“Biography is the literature of realized personality, of life as it has been lived, of actual achievements or shortcomings, of success or failure; it is not imaginary and embellished, not what might be or might have been, not reduced to prescribed or artificial forms, but it is the unvarnished story of that which was delightful, disappointing, possible, or impossible, in a life spent in this world. ” ~James Boswell

Healing Nations 

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood 
And I, I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.”
– Robert Frost

November   17 – Take A Hike Day

“Hiking is a bit like life:  The journey only requires you to put one foot in front of the other…again and again and again.  And if you allow yourself the opportunity to be present throughout the entirety of the trek, you will witness beauty every step of the way, not just at the summit” unknown

How will you celebrate Take a Hike day?

“Entering the world of the spirit, I saw a vision which I could not adequately describe if I lived for a thousand years. The central part was a broad highway lined with beautiful trees radiating all the colors of the rainbow. Each tree bore all the fruits known to me and many others I had never seen before. The nine-pointed star was situated at the end of the road and drew me towards it and in the distance there were parks and gardens with rare trees from many countries and friends of all colors and creeds. Dominating the garden of delight was The Tree of Life with leaves for the healing of the Nations.” Richard St. Barbe Baker 

Longevity from trees 

Living near green spaces linked to longer lives, study finds. Being around vegetation decreased risk of mortality from common causes of death by 8-12%. CBC News. October 11, 2017

Living Close To Trees May Help You Live Longer: Study.  A new study finds that people who lived close to trees or vegetation had an eight to 12 per cent reduced risk of dying compared to those that didn’t.  Huffington post 10/11/2017

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…today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth.  Richard St. Barbe Baker

How rich is Saskatoon?


Saskatoon’s Forests.

Our 150 Forest Stories, Our Future, Celebrating Saskatoon’s Forests!

During Canada’s 150 anniversary, is it possible to compile 150 Forest Stories of Saskatoon?

What kind of forest stories does Saskatoon have to share with the world?  Could it be that the life of a tree is a life of service?  Is it as Richard Louv says; ” “We have such a brief opportunity to pass on to our children our love for this Earth, and to tell our stories. These are the moments when the world is made whole. In my children’s memories, the adventures we’ve had together in nature will always exist.”

Canadian Forestry Association announces 2017 National Forest Week , September 24th to 30th, 2017, Theme: Canada’s Forests: Our stories, Our Future  Celebrating Canada’s Forests!

The Canadian Institute of Forestry has a 2017 National Forest Week Event Calendar whereupon, the citizens can celebrate National Forest Week locally with the 150 Forest Story event in Saskatoon.

The Canadian Forestry Association invite you to celebrate National Forest week in your neck of the wood!

Richard St. Barbe Baker embraced our future in forests;…today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth.” Richard St. Barbe Baker “We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.”

Can you add one Sasaktoon forest story to the 150 Saskatoon forest stories collection?

Email your story

You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover “~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For more information:

“Passion is lifted from the earth itself by the muddy hands of the young; it travels along grass-stained sleeves to the heart. If we are going to save environmentalism and the environment, we must also save an endangered indicator species: the child in nature.”
― Richard Louv

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

 

The life of a tree is a life of service

Urban Forestry Offices of Canadian Civic Governments~ Saskatoon ~”
Trees play a significant role in our quality of life and provide a positive effect by beautifying our city for residents and tourists to enjoy. All trees that grow in Saskatoon are part of the urban forest including trees on both private and public property.” Canadian Forests

 

The citizens who live in Saskatoon have a keen and vibrant interest in Saskatoon’s urban forest! The City of Saskatoon has a legacy of honouring forests.  This year for the 2017 National Forest Week,  September 24th to 30ththe theme is Canada’s Forests: Our Stories, Our Future Celebrating Canada’s Forests!  What are some of the City of Saskatoon’s forest stories?

  1. The SOS Elms Coalition has published two City of Saskatoon tree tour booklets, one in 2004 and an update in 2015
  2. The Sutherland Forest Nursery Station supplied about 150 million trees across Saskatchewan to homesteaders in the early twentieth century.  This nursery has become the Saskatoon Forestry Farm Park in 1968 and is today honoured as a National Historic site.
  3. Saskatoon also is host to an “Enchanted Forest”   The Enchanted Forest glowing is a time when the visitors to the Enchanted Forest become tender and enamoured with love and kindred spirit.  It is a celebration of the holiday season embracing the very idea of loving others, embracing childhood memories and becoming as a child enraptured in delight again.
  4. The Patterson’s Garden Arboretum is honoured by the Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), is part of Canada’s Garden Route and is treasured in Saskatoon’s Register of Historic Places and is a priority of the  City of Saskatoon Municipal Heritage Advisory Committee (MHAC) 
  5. The Fred Mitchell Memorial Gardens  is another gem of Saskatoon, a forest, placed by City of Saskatoon residents on Saskatoon’s Register of Historic Places.  
  6. Saskatoon’s Memorial Avenue was begun by the Saskatoon branch of the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire that who stated that:“A tree is a living memorial often more enduring than marble or bronze; a tree is a thing of beauty and of inspiration — a living token of the wonder and glory of nature– a symbol of service– for the life of a tree is a life of service, even the end of life is not the end of a tree’s service; to the contrary, the end of a life opens new fields of service which add immeasurably to our civilization, our culture, and our happiness; therefore, is not a tree a fitting symbol for those valiant men who gave their lives for the service of their country and who died that humanity might continue to live in civilization, in culture, and in happiness?”
  7. The Meewasin Memorial Forest within the Gabriel Dumont Park is a living tribute to bring comfort to the family, and honour of a dearly departed loved one.  Richard St. Barbe Baker, himself had spoken to his close friends of wishes to be fulfilled on his passing.  One wish was that a large tree would grace his burial site.  When Baker ~ the founder of the International Tree Foundation (Men of the Trees Organization)  died on 9 June 1982 during his visit to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, he planted his last tree on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan where he was one of the first students.   Baker is, indeed, buried near at a site with two large spruce trees in Woodlawn Cemetery, Saskatoon.  *Let children walk with Nature, let them see the beautiful blendings and communions of death and life, their joyous inseparable unity, as taught in woods and meadows, plains and mountains and streams of our blessed star, and they will learn that death is stingless indeed, and as beautiful as life. ~John Muir
  8. The Meewasin Valley Authority, as well, has initiated the “Plant a Tree” Program.  “Planting and growing increasing quantities of trees is the scientific solution to Earth’s environmental dilemma.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker  Not only did Baker plant a tree in a public ceremony before his passing by some estimates, organizations Richard St. Barbe Baker founded or assisted have been responsible for planting at least 26 trillion trees, internationally.   One of the organistions is the International Tree Foundation which began in Kenya with the first Watu wa Miti, or Men of the Trees. These forest scouts promised that they would indeed protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

This preceding listing of eight stories honouring the forests and trees of Saskatoon is by no means complete, thee is a resplendent River Valley along the South Saskatchewan River, and the city of Saskatoon is bedecked with an urban forest of boulevards, parks, named heritage parks, municipal reserves and green spaces.

Amongst the honour of forests and green spaces is the story of two more forests the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the adjoining afforestation area “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park in the City of Saskatoon

1960  the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, the “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park and a third afforestation area lands were bought

1972 sees drought resistant trees, Scotch Pine, Caragana, Elm, Balsam Poplar, Colorado Blue Spruce planted in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the”George Genereux” Urban Regional Park and the third afforestation area. In total 355 acres of afforestation areas were planted that year.  In 1973, 355 additional acres are planted.  Originally 2,300 acres were envisioned.

1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before council that these first  660 acres of afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity.Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the adjoining afforestation area “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park are part of these first 660 acres along with a third afforestation area on the other side of the river south of Gabriel Dumont Park, and in 1972 west of the golf course.

1978 Oct 19 Name “Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area” brought forward to city council; Dec 28, 1978 proposed that the area become a park; Jan 2, 1979, this is recommended by council.  The name George Genereux is also brought forward.

1985 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is dedicated June 15

…today it is the duty of every thinking being to live, and to serve not only his own day and generation, but also generations unborn by helping to restore and maintain the green glory of the forests of the earth.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Do you know of another Saskatoon forest which is special to you, and bears a particular story.   Please take time to share your story as well as the stories listed above.  Wouldn’t it be fantastic to have 150 Forest Stories of Saskatoon in honour of Canada’s 150 birthday?
 2017 National Forest Week,  September 24th to 30ththe theme is Canada’s Forests: Our Stories, Our Future Celebrating Canada’s Forests!

Come to the woods, for here is rest. There is no repose like that of the green deep woods. Sleep in forgetfulness of all ill.     

John Muir

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Forest Eco-systems

 

Have you ever heard of an Edible Forest Gardens?

Would you know how to create a Forest Garden?

Picture yourself in a forest where almost everything around  you is food.  …An edible forest garden is a perennial polyculture  of multi-purpose plants. Dave Jacke,  Eric Toensmeier 

Focused on National Forest Week September 24 – September 30,. 2017.  The Canadian Forestry Association  states that the theme this year is Canada’s Forests: Our Stories, Our Future Celebrating Canada’s Forests!

What kind of stories do Saskatoon Forests tell?  Do you think any of Saskatoon’s Forests are Edible Forest Gardens?

What do you know of Trembling Aspen, Colorado Blue Spruce, American Elm, Buffaloberry, Snowberry, Scots Pine, or Balsam Poplar?  Would any of these stately trees and bushes ever have an edible quality to them?  Historically, or in contemporary time what would be the answer examining a forest of such trees as an edible forest garden?

Edible forest gardens, indeed do readily comprise the Saskatoon berry, high bush and low bush cranberry, the pincherry, the raspberry, wild strawberry, the rosehip, and the chokecherry.  But trees?  The Balsam Poplar, could it ever be a part of an edible forest garden?  Would anyone survive on a tree in the middle of any old forest in the dead cold of winter?

What a story might be told.. a Saskatoon Forest Story for this year’s National Forest Week embracing Canada’s Forests: Our Stories, Our Future Celebrating Canada’s Forests!  Check out the local grassroots initiative!

The world is so unpredictable. Things happen suddenly, unexpectedly. We want to feel we are in control of our own existence. In some ways we are, in some ways we’re not. We are ruled by the forces of chance and coincidence.

Paul Auster

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

City council meeting.

Monday August 28. 2017

A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.
Franklin D. Roosevelt

There is a city council follow up meeting  to the Standing Policy Committee on Planning, Development and Community Services meeting of Monday August 4.  The City of Saskatoon meeting will be Monday August 28, 2017.  The agenda will be to continue discussion regarding the Inquiry from former Councillor Lorje (April 25, 2016) – Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area [File No. CK. 4000-1 and PL. 4131-39-1 (BF 016-16)]

We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.

Max de Pree

The Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area will be considered by City Council at its Regular Business meeting to commence at 1:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017. The public may attend this meeting of City Council and, if you wish to bring forward any points relevant to the discussion write a letter providing additional information, and/or requesting to speak at the Council meeting.

Drop off a letter addressed to His Worship the Mayor and Members of City Council.  c/o City Clerk’s Office, City Hall. City of Saskatoon | 222 3rd Avenue North | Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5 by 10:00 a.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017; or submit your intent to speak for up to five minutes by the online form.

For more information on the meeting, the agenda or how to Write a Letter check the City of Saskatoon’s website prior to Monday, August 28, 2017

By eating meat we share the responsibility of climate change, the destruction of our forests, and the poisoning of our air and water. The simple act of becoming a vegetarian will make a difference in the health of our planet.

Thich Nhat Hanh

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker