Vision for the Future

Saskatoon has a a Strategic plan which embraces the decade 2013-2023. Within the plan are seven strategic goals to accomplish the Saskatoon Community Vision. The vision identified these seven goals from community engagement, Saskatoon Speaks.

“There are no limits to the majestic future which lies before the mighty expanse of Canada with its virile, aspiring, cultured, and generous-hearted people.
– Sir Winston Churchill”

The Strategic goal of continuous improvement is proactive, innovative, and forward thinking.

The Strategic goal of asset and financial sustainability brings forward best practices, balances debt, investment, funding plans and capital improvements when managing City goals and guidelines.

The Strategic goal, quality of life, focuses on the theme of social well being, recreation, parks and community culture. Saskatoon’s neighbourhoods and communities thrive with access to natural beauty, parks, trails, options, and an active, vibrant future. Improving quality of life examines active opportunities and services for a winter city. Saskatoon’s community spirit embraces creative ways to include all citizens, and everyone is enriched with the feeling of belonging to this rich and dynamic city. Together, with open conversation, and innovative collaboration bridges are built, focusing on services important to the community and its citizens. With pro-active quality of life, the community forges ahead together enhancing future opportunities. This strategy, quality of life, reduces and prevents crime across the city while increasing community building and meeting community needs.

Environmental leadership marks another Strategic goal. The urban forest, green open space, connect with the South Saskatchewan River resulting in a healthy and strong ecosystem supporting a lush and vigorous bio-diversity of flora and fauna in the aspen parkland biome. The City of Saskatoon respect for the environment resonates and reverberates in harmony with nature – the woodlands, wetlands and grasslands.

The Strategic goal of sustainable growth, embraces both the city centre, and shaping the city growth. This plan examines the process of updating, and establishing infill corridors, and redefining existing and new neighbourhood development.

The Strategic goal of moving around examines the efficient, accessible and comprehensive flow of people and goods around Saskatoon.

Economic Diversity and Prosperity, focusing on the City’s economy is also one of the seven Strategic goals focusing on building diverse communities with positive and successful options and thriving outcomes for entrepreneurs, unique industries, and business areas.

How will the population of Saskatoon spike over the next years? The city of Saskatoon is founded on a solid base of prosperity with a rich quality of life, and an amazing environment. The citizens are thus doubly enriched that today is sustainable with wholesome opportunities, and that the city of Saskatoon has a dynamic vision and plan for the future.

“The present is full of opportunity. Never before in the history of the planet has mankind been given the privileges and opportunities that are at his disposal today. A great light has been raised and is penetrating the darkness of the world, but alas,
too many with dust blinded eyes have yet to catch the vision. Some of us have. That is our privilege and our responsibility. ” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Read more…. Strategic Plan 2013-2023

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Off Leash Dog Park Valley Road Saskatoon!
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
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Protecting your pet

By nature man is a
forest dweller.

National Pet Day April 11

“Why does watching a dog be a dog fill one with happiness?”
—Jonathan Safran Foer

From Our Hearts
With Our Hands
For The Earth
All The World Together
~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Among domestic animals, parasitic diseases are very common. Lice, mites, ticks, flies, and round and flat worms are examples of insects and worms living at the host’s expense which may cause parasitic disease. Most commonly parasites inhabit the digestive tract and skin, however they may invade any bodily organs. In the case of mosquitoes, flies and ticks, it is the transfer of microorganisms to healthy individuals via the punctures or the bites as they travel from one species to another.

When entering in to the natural environment of the woodlands with your pet, it is best to be informed.  Ticks like to stand in tall grass or sit upon plants in wooded areas waiting for a chance to cling to hosts. “On dogs, ticks often attach themselves in crevices and/or areas with little to no hair, typically in and around the ears, the areas where the insides of the legs meet the body, between the toes, and within skin folds.Ticks” For humans, a tick will mainly travel upward to the hairline. When a suitable site on the host is found, the tick digs it mouthparts into the skin and starts its blood meal. This meal may last just a few hours, or several days.

” Pesticide product that kills ticks is known as an acaricide. Acaricides that can be used on dogs include dusts, impregnated collars, sprays, or topical treatments. Some acaricides kill the tick on contact. Others may be absorbed into the bloodstream of a dog and kill ticks that attach and feed.Preventing

“Watch your pet for symptoms of tick-borne diseases. Some symptoms include arthritis or lameness that lasts for three to four days, reluctance to move, swollen joints, fever, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, loss of appetite and neurological problems.Getting” These symptoms may not appear immediately, but may manifest 7-21 days or longer following a tick bite.

Fine-tipped, precision tweezers work the best to remove ticks as you can focus their tips on the mouth part of the tick, without squeezing the tick body.

“Grasp the tick as close to the skin of the host … pull upwards with steady, even pressure. Do not twist or jerk the tick as this may leave its mouth parts embedded, or cause it to regurgitate disease-causing fluids. If any mouth parts do break off, they may be removed with a sterilised needle or tweezer points…. Do not squeeze or crush the body of the tick, because its fluids (saliva and gut contents) may contain disease-causing organisms and leak into the host’s bloodstream or in to the skin.Tick

For your pet, fill up a child’s wading pool in your yard when the weather is warmer. Then go for a walk with your dog. When you arrive back home, the sun will have warmed the chilly water from the hose. It will be easier to pop your dog into the warmer water of the wading pool outdoors, and this quick bath may rid your pet of any ticks your eyes have missed. The slicking down of the fur in the water may also help to reveal the missed ticks, thus protecting your dog from illness.

Keep the surroundings where your pet lives as tick free as possible. Using diatomaceous earth is a frequently used method to rid the dog’s bedding and yard area of ticks.

Educate yourself and unravel the best practices to protect your pet on National Pet Day, April 11.

“Dogs don’t rationalize. They don’t hold anything against a person. They don’t see the outside of a human but the inside of a human.”
—Cesar Millan

“A forest is a perfect example of the law of return in action. Trees give back to the earth more then they take, while building up humus, and enriching the soil by the minerals that have been carried up to the leaves in the rising sap. By nature man is a
forest dweller. He was cradled in the tropics. His food was the fruit of the trees. He possessed the secret of adaptation to his environment, so that health, gentleness, beauty and strength were enjoyed to the full. In his forest setting man was conscious
of his relationship to God and of his unity with all living things. ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

BILBIOGRAPHY
Getting Ticks off Dogs Humane Society.

Preventing Ticks on Dogs Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Tick Removal Fine Tipped Tweezers. BADA Borreliosis and Associated Diseases Awareness UK

Ticks on Dogs.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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A Single Spruce, A Single Glory!

A Snow day literally and figuratively falls from the sky ~ unbidden ~ and seems like a thing of wonder”~Susan Orlean<

Colorado Blue Spruce Picea pungens in Winter
Colorado Blue Spruce Picea pungens in Winter copyright Julia Adamson

A Snow day literally and figuratively falls from the sky ~ unbidden ~ and seems like a thing of wonder“~Susan Orlean

 

A Single Spruce, A Singular Glory; Prithee now the story…

One from the archives…
Colorado Blue Spruce Picea pungens with foliage mottled and marbled with white blanket of snow. The soft cover a marked contrast to the foliage highlighting, nay caressing the pattern which in due time allow and reveal to our eyes beholden  the varied lines, nuances and lacy swirls. For thou art captivating in thy winter charms and this snowy robe has made this fine wonder yours. Hiding leaves so green amid this fair world of ours. It is thus that a wonder such as this doth work inside of me with a canvas rich and beautiful. And is it true that when the winter hibernal months come at last, that it is then that snowflakes become your butterflies? Have you ever entered into that wilderness, have you ever found the spruce decked out in white? Let not God’s rattle rob your sight but on this wintery morn; step out and see the varied shapes amid the wood, a pleasure so fine, that time and space fold away that perchance one may say that the space seems but divine. For ’tis graced with Sun’s warmth and light the heavy laden bough among the green doth shine within the kindly beams. On boughs now gathering winter wool, the snowflakes, so light they worked, and now scarcely should a living soul doth breathe lest the wondrous sculpture shouldst break. Oh have you ever seen a lovely sight as this, bred by the sun on that wondrous winter’s day. Can you walk in the urban wilderness park, and see such sweet music cry? Oh can you hear the snow settle down with laughter in the trees? Such does the wind lay down its the silent spell, so stop and marvel for awhile, drink in Nature’s song~ swallowing the spruce green boundaries. And look around at millions of souls, the spruce turned green to white, and look this day upon their face, and truly do walk apace in joy among the giant spruce in these hibernal months I do so love.

In sleep of helpless infancy
Trees were the arms that cradled me;
On Tree my daily food is spread;
Tree is my chair, and Tree is my bed.
~Theresa Hooley

When snow falls, nature listens ! Antoinette van Kleef.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

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If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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One of the earliest [memories] is that of the pine forest which came up close to the house. I often sat in the sun there and in the tree tops I seemed to hear the sound of waves breaking on the sea-shore. Those pines spoke to me of distant lands and gave me my first desire to travel and see the trees of other countries. At times I would imagine that these tall pines were talking to each other as they shook or nodded their heads at the whim of the winds.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Hibernal Labyrinth

As I wandered on as in a dream, all sense of time and space lost. ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Were you there?

The snowstorm provided atmosphere in a glance; a subtle nuance which the snow covers as if the forest possessed an iniquitous or gentle soul. Within the forest enraptured within the illusion of time, and the dance of snowflakes are never at rest; even within the narrow compass of the forest they develop a scene; growing in captivating, spell-binding wonder and beauty, the landscape continuously transformed; the trees and snow swirl together in “sync,” and ideality unites thus the blanketed forest vision with that of the humans.

For is it not on such a day that we do, indeed create our world? Wonderfully wrought, rich yet dim was the day, as if God himself had dipped his artistic brush in mist and not in reality. Time and space died that day. The mysticism of the day revealed itself in a spell-bound trance, all of nature was settled, serene, and the pattern wove a splendour of moods and tonalities.

The blizzard brought a new way of seeing, the rhythm of the wind as a cinematograph carrying the eye to a point of distraction. As the trees danced about in their newly donned snowy robes, we tread about the snow drifts as the wind blew on and on. Under the snow blanket hidden deep, the squirrels, and mice uttered not a peep. The pine boughs laden under the bevy of snow, held fast the chickadee and waxwing, for in the blizzard no song of bird across the woodlands was ever heard. So it is thus to tell the story when the pale glow of the northern Canadian sun faded behind the gathering snow.

Step by step walk now through the snow, enveloped in this seemingly endless wilderness. The day revealed snow stretching out before the travelers unbroken by track, or footprint of any living creature. The outset of the day ’twas quite impossible to look or see for a pace around, the snow fell thick and fast. The big snow caressed the earth, and upon the woodland trees fell whispering through the wind, catching on the top of the swaying spruce-tops. And such was the day, the day of the big snow that transfigured the spirit, and aligned a new rhythm within the landscape creating new perspectives.

Little snowflakes, insignificant at first, ranging themselves into complex and grand atmospheres which can transfix melodramatic eyes. The multiplicity of details now hidden create new notes of nature revealing breathtaking scenes of dramatic power, creating vivid visions of silent peace. The day has now passed, and with it, too, the sun has taken the vision.

The harmony and symphony of the blizzard, the sense of serenity has played out in the vanishing seconds down the corridor of time. And yet there is a delightful consolation captured ~ the alluring mystery hovering around the woodlands that day when the north wind danced with the woodlands Grace.

“According to ancient mythology, trees were the first living things on earth. This is borne out by scientific reasoning which shows that it is through them that the air we breathe can give life to humanity. Through countless ages trees have been drawing carbonic acid gas from the atmosphere, absorbing and incorporating the carbon, assimilating it; then when they die, bequeathing to soil their carboniferous remains. The consequence has been that eventually the atmospheric oxygen was left sufficiently pure for the requirements of birds and mammals which have replaced the flying reptiles and monstrous amphibians that were able to endure the heavy air of primeval swamps and jungles.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“As I wandered on as in a dream, all sense of time and space lost.  As I continued this mysterious journey, looking up every now and then I could see shafts of light where the sunshine lit up the morning mists and made subtle shadows on the huge bracken fronds which provided a continuous canopy of bright green over me.  Their pungent scent was a delight to me.  Although I could see only a few yards ahead, I had no sense of being shut in.  The sensation was exhilarating.  I began to walk faster, buoyed up with an almost ethereal feeling of well-being, as if I had been detached from earth. I became intoxicated with the beauty around me, immersed in the joyousness and exultation of feeling part of it all.~Richard St. Barbe Baker.”

The Saskatchewan Woodpecker

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is home to woodpeckers, they can be sighted and heard pecking on the trees. Among foresters, a unique specialty taken up by Richard St. Barbe Baker is silviculturists or “tree doctor.” Joining the ranks of silviculturists, is Dr. Woodpecker, tree surgeon, extraodinaire who destroys destructive forest insects. Long ago Nature selected the woodpecker to be the chief caretaker—the physician and surgeon—of the tree world.

The study of forest insects has not progressed far enough to enable one to make more than a rough approximation of the number of the important species that attack our common trees. The birches supply food to about three hundred of these predacious bugs, while poplars feed and shelter almost as many. The pines and spruces are compelled permanently to pension or provide for about three hundred families of sucking, chewing parasites.

The recent ravages of Dutch elm disease (DED) fungi (Ophiostoma) is caused by a member of the sac fungi (Ascomycota) affecting elm trees, and is spread by the American elm bark beetle Hylurgopinus rufipes, who transmit the fungi. Together with other evils, suggest at once the bigness of these problems and the importance of their study and solution. The insect army is as innumerable as the leaves in the forest. This army occupies points of vantage in every part of the tree zone, has an insatiable appetite, is eternally vigilant for invasion, and is eager to multiply. It maintains incessant warfare against the forest, and every tree that matures must run a gauntlet of enemies in series, each species of which is armed with weapons long specialized for the tree’s destruction. Some trees escape unscarred, though countless numbers are killed and multitudes maimed, which for a time live almost useless lives, ever ready to spread insects and disease among the healthy trees.

Every part of the tree suffers; even its roots are cut to pieces and consumed. Caterpillars, grubs, and beetles specialize on defoliation and feed upon the leaves, the lungs of the trees. The partial defoliation of the tree is devitalizing, and the loss of all its leaves commonly kills it. Not only is the tree itself attacked but also its efforts toward reproduction. The dainty bloom is food for a number of insect beasts, while the seed is fed upon and made an egg-depository by other enemies. Weevils, blight, gall, ants, aphids, and lice prey upon it. The seed drops upon the earth into another army that is hungry and waiting to devour it. The moment it sprouts it is gnawed, stung, bitten, and bored by ever-active fiends.

Many forest trees are scarred in the base by ground fires. These trees are entered by insects through the scars and become sources of rot and insect infection. Although these trees may for a time live on, it is with a rotten heart or as a mere hollow shell. A forest fire that sweeps raging through the tree-tops has a very different effect: the twigs and bark are burned off and the pitches are boiled through the exterior of the trunk and the wood fortified against all sources of decay.

In forest protection and improvement the insect factor is one that will not easily down. Controlling the depredations of beetles, borers, weevils, and fungi calls for work of magnitude, but work that insures success. This work consists of the constant removal of both the infected trees and the dwarfed or injured ones that are susceptible to infection without hesitation. Most forest insects multiply with amazing rapidity; some mother bark-beetles may have half a million descendants in less than two years. Thus efforts for the control of insect outbreaks should begin at once,—in the early stages of their activity. A single infested tree may in a year or two spread destruction through thousands of acres of forest.

Most insects have enemies to bite them. Efforts to control forest-enemies will embrace the giving of aid and comfort to those insects that prey upon them. Bugs will be hunted with bugs. Already the gypsy moth in the East is being fought in this way. Many species of birds feed freely upon weevils, borers, and beetles. Of these birds, the woodpeckers are the most important. They must be protected and encouraged. Forest influences and forest scenes add much to existence and bestow blessings upon life that cannot be measured by gold.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is home to woodpeckers, they can be sighted and heard pecking on the trees. Among the various species which may be found are the Northern Flicker Colaptes auratus, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Sphyrapicus varius, Hairy Woodpecker Picoides villosus, Downy Woodpecker Picoides pubescens, Black-backed Three-toed Woodpecker or Arctic three-toed woodpecker Picoides arcticus, American three-toed woodpecker Picoides dorsalis, and Pileated Woodpecker~uncommon~ Dryocopus pileatus. Of these, only the Northern Flicker, Hairy and Downy Woodpecker are common, the remaining are uncommon, and are a sight to behold!

Among foresters, a unique specialty is silviculturists or “tree doctor.” Joining the ranks of silviculturists, is Dr. Woodpecker, tree surgeon, extraodinaire who destroys destructive forest insects. Long ago Nature selected the woodpecker to be the chief caretaker—the physician and surgeon—of the tree world. This is a stupendous task. Forests are extensive and are formed of hundreds of species of trees. The woodpeckers have the supervision of uncounted acres that are forested with more than six hundred kinds of trees.

In this incessant struggle with insects the woodpecker has helpful assistance from many other bird families. Though the woodpecker gives general attention to hundreds of kinds of insects, he specializes on those which injure the tree internally,—which require a surgical operation to obtain. He is a distinguished specialist; the instruments for tree-surgery are entrusted to his keeping, and with these he each year performs innumerable successful surgical operations upon our friends the trees.

Borers, beetles, and weevils are among the worst enemies of trees. They multiply with astounding rapidity, and do not hesitate at all  annually killing millions of scattered trees. Annually, too, there are numerous outbreaks of beetles, whose depredations extend over hundreds and occasionally over thousands of acres. Caterpillars, moths, and saw-flies are exceedingly injurious tree-pests, but they damage the outer parts of the tree. Both they and their eggs are easily accessible to many kinds of birds, including the woodpeckers; but borers, beetles, and weevils live and deposit their eggs in the very vitals of the tree. In the tree’s vitals, protected by a heavy barrier of wood or bark, they are secure from the beaks and claws of all birds except Dr. Woodpecker, the chief surgeon of the forest. About the only opportunity that other birds have to feed upon borers and beetles is during the brief time they occupy in emerging from the tree that they have killed, in their flight to some live tree, and during their brief exposure while boring into it.

Left in undisturbed possession of a tree, many mother beetles may have half a million descendants in a single season. Fortunately for the forest, Dr. Woodpecker, during his ceaseless round of inspection and service, generally discovers infested trees. If one woodpecker is not equal to the situation, many are concentrated at this insect-breeding place; and here they remain until the last dweller in darkness is reached and devoured. Thus most beetle outbreaks are prevented.

Woodpecker holes commonly are shallow, except in dead trees. Most of the burrowing or boring insects which infest living trees work in the outermost sapwood, just beneath the bark, or in the inner bark. Hence the doctor does not need to cut deeply. In most cases his peckings in the wood are so shallow that no scar or record is found. Hence a tree might be operated on by him a dozen times in a season, and still not show a scar when split or sawed into pieces. Most of his peckings simply penetrate the bark, and on living trees this epidermis scales off; thus in a short time all traces of his feast-getting are obliterated.

Woodpeckers commonly nest in a dead limb or trunk, a number of feet from the ground. Here, in the heart of things, they excavate a moderately roomy nest. It is common for many woodpeckers to peck out a deep hole in a dead tree for individual shelter during the winter. Generally neither nest nor winter lodging is used longer than a season. The abandoned holes are welcomed as shelters and nesting-places by many birds that prefer wooden-walled houses but cannot themselves construct them. Chickadees and bluebirds often nest in them. Owls frequently philosophize within these retreats. On bitter cold nights these holes shelter and save birds of many species. Nuthatches as well may be seen issuing from a woodpecker’s hole in a dead limb.

Woodpeckers are as widely distributed as forests,—just how many to the square mile no one knows. Some localities are blessed with a goodly number, made up of representatives from three or four of our twenty-four woodpecker species. Forest, shade, and orchard trees receive their impartial attention. The annual saving from their service is enormous. Although this cannot be estimated, it can hardly be overstated.

On World Wildlife Day ~ March 3 stop, look and listen ~ remember these tales about the urban city’s forest friends. The animals are delightful characters to know. Avoid disturbing the roosting and nesting sites to respect the welfare of these birds. Tread lightly in the forest, and be respectful, the issues facing the woodlands and the semi-wilderness wildlife habitat are complex. Please support Nature Conservancy Saskatchewan, Partners in Flight, Saskatoon Nature Society, Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Saskatchewan, Living Sky Wildlife Rehabilitation, National Audobon Society.

On speaking to young foresters. “‘Forest’ is an old word. It was derived from a word which meant the forest reserved for the royal games. The work of the forest department was to preserve and look after them. The context has totally changed. The importance of the forest is now for the whole society. The first product of the forest is its life-giving oxygen, followed by water and food. The fifth place is that of balancing the climates and arresting erosion. Raw material of industrial importance and wood are provided by the forest which, though they rank sixth in the list, are unfortunately being accorded the highest priority at present. Therefore the management of the forest should receive priorities according to the actual importance of the commodity. You have been given the dignified name of the Conservators of Forests. You are not timber merchants. ” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker, silviculturist

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

“I believe that if children fall in love with wildlife they will grow up wanting to protect it.”
― Imogen Taylor

. We have a motto in the Men of the Trees. TWAHAMWE. It is an African word meaning ‘pull together’ and I pass this on to all those concerned with conservation in this country. I would like to call you to silence for a moment with the words of Mathew Arnold:
“Calm soul of all things, make it mine,
To feel amidst the City ‘s jar
That there abides a peace of thine
Men did not make and cannot mar
~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Caring for a tree is caring of your soul.

The Athshean word for world is also the word for forest.

Woodlands Protection Installed.

Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center
Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the South west off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center

The trees in the afforestation area are being cared for! A simply fantastic development has occurred ~ the City of Saskatoon urban forest located between the Civic Operations Center (Bus Barns Construction site) and the South West off leash recreation area has motorized vehicle restrictions installed in the form of Jersey Barriers and locked gates.

What an amazing way to preserve and conserve the natural wildlife habitat corridor. What a wonderful way to inspire ethics and encourage others to tread lightly in the underbrush encourage the growth and development of the Colorado Blue Spruce saplings. This development encourages visitors to the afforestation area to be respectful of the treasure of this urban forest nestled in the City of Saskatoon. It is with pride that visitors can come to the City of Saskatoon afforestation area to behold the wonders of birds and the natural world.

Entering a protected afforestation area, the healthy biodiversity, hundreds of different and separate grasses and wildflower amid the shrubs and trees comprise the ecosystem. An ecosystem like no other in this Aspen Parkland of Saskatchewan. Within the city of Saskatoon, a wondrous delight to behold a mixed forest of Trembling Aspen Populus tremuloides, American Elm Ulmus americana, Colorado Blue Spruce Picea pungens, Scotch Pine Pinus sylvestris L, Willow Salix, Black Balsam Poplar Populus balsamifera, Snowberry Symphoricarpos albus, Honeysuckle Lonicera, Canada Buffaloberry Shepherdia canadensis growing in harmony and thriving. In Saskatchewan, native evergreens require a much higher elevation, so in the majority of open spaces and eco-zones in the Aspen Parkland, there are not the evergreens. The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) absolutely needs the woodlands to nest and roost set beside the wetlands for foraging. The evergreen pine needles are used to line the nests, which can start out 20 inches (50.8 cm) in diameter in the woodlands.

Depending upon the environmental condition, the flora and fauna varies in their display. It suffices to say the afforestation area west of the Civic Operations Center, east of the South West off leash recreation area with such vehicle barriers, and path use to mitigate the human eco-footprint will encourage this afforestation area to be a healthy and thriving eco-system.

Bylaw No. 7767 The Recreation Facilities and Parks Usage Bylaw, 1998 Codified to Bylaw 9377 May 24, 2016. This bylaw covers snowmobiles, city maintenance vehicles, and vehicles within city parks.

Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center
Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center

“Their life is mysterious, it is like a forest; from far off it seems a unity, it can be comprehended, described, but closer it begins to separate, to break into light and shadow, the density blinds one. Within there is no form, only prodigious detail that reaches everywhere: exotic sounds, spills of sunlight, foliage, fallen trees, small beasts that flee at the sound of a twig-snap, insects, silence, flowers.

And all of this, dependent, closely woven, all of it is deceiving. There are really two kinds of life. There is, as Viri says, the one people believe you are living, and there is the other. It is this other which causes the trouble, this other we long to see.”
― James Salter, Light Years

Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center
Vehicle Restriction Barriers at the Afforestation Area between the SW off leash recreation area and the Civic Operations Center

“A forest ecology is a delicate one. If the forest perishes, its fauna may go with it. The Athshean word for world is also the word for forest.”
― Ursula K. Le Guin, The Word for World is Forest

“Caring a tree is caring of your soul.”

“Planting a tree is the easiest way to align yourself with the cosmic rhythm.”

― Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being