Lesser Yellowlegs Threatened due to Loss of Wetlands

Threatened in Saskatchewan as recorded by SCDC Lesser Yellowlegs Tringa flavipes
Threatened in Saskatchewan as recorded by SCDC Lesser Yellowlegs Tringa flavipes

So, everyone once in awhile, one wonders why there are such things as bioblitzes, or ecoquests to record biodiversity. Then there are such shorebirds as Lesser Yellowlegs Tringa flavipes which are considered threatened in Saskatchewan by the Saskatchewan Conservation Data Centre. Coming out to connect with nature, and record your sightings are invaluable to a species such as Lesser Yellowlegs. Their lives depend on you!

In this year of severe drought, there are so many wetlands drying up, it is a wonder that those birds which migrated north have any water at all.

To begin to look at the species profile and why they are considered threatened, well there are little to no wetlands policies around for conservation when development wishes to go through, and then drought has taken what little there is away. And the reason for the threatened designation is that there are substantial declines recorded in bird surveys. Loss of wetlands is one concern, but there is also climate change taking its toll along with other factors.

Society has started to rally with Bee crusades, and Monarch butterfly flyways and pollinator gardens, but who has started a shorebirds action? Who has said that the wetlands policy must become a bylaw, and that it should protect the habitats of species at risk? So, COSEWIC provided the threatened designation 21 years ago for the Lesser Yellow Legs, and sadly to say, it has not changed. Are you good at letter writing. Can you write a letter to your Member of Parliament, Member of the Legislative Assembly, or Councillor? What would happen to mankind if we did nothing for the decline in homo sapiens species from Coronavirus COVID-19 for 21 years? Society surely did rally to fix the rapidly declining deaths and illness from COVID through a number of vaccines. The Lesser Yellow Legs is not sick, so it doesn’t need a rapidly developed vaccine. The population of the Lesser Yellow Legs has gone down because they have no home to live in. Their homes are wetlands. And what do we do with wetlands? Fill them in as quickly as possible with compost, gravel or any excavation material so we can build on them – who cares how many basements are flooded, and who cares how many Lesser Yellowlegs die without a home.

Luckily in Saskatoon the long range planners are doing a Green Network Connectivity Strategy to keep the wetlands of the West Swale! The West Swale joins the North Saskatchewan River Valley to the South Saskatchewan River Valley, and what a marvellous wetlands corridor that is! That surely shows continuous improvements and environmental leadership!

When will action start for the shorebirds? It is surely good that this decade is the United Nations Decade on Ecological Restoration, and we can love some shorebirds and protect their habitat. What thinks you?

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Earth Day phenology

Earth Day April 22

What are you doing for Earth Day this spring?

What a great time to discover phenological changes. How does winter change to spring? What kinds of leaf budding and inflorescence blooming can you see? How are your entomological skills as the weather warms up? Perhaps your skills lay in the field of ophiology or herpetology.

Check out the iNaturalist.pdf pamphlet! In your iNaturalist tree observation include the full photo of the tree, the tree bark and the end of a branch or a twig to help with identification! If it is an evergreen make a note if the needle rolls easily between two finger and is round, or if when rolled the needle feels square. 

Besides capturing the imagery of plants, flowers and trees, find out if you can sight an animal, insect or bird!

Perhaps when out walking this spring, a discovery will be made regarding the Trembling Aspen bluffs. Pay attention, as each bluff is a clone, and the trembling aspen trees you see all belong to one root, and are all one large entity. That’s not all, some Trembling Aspen bluffs are female, and others are male. In the spring when the catkins can be seen is the best time to determine if the Trembling Aspen bluff is male of female! How many Trembling Aspen bluffs are out in the afforestation areas? How many of these clonal groupings are male, and how many are female>

We would be happy to get you acquainted with iNaturalist and how fun it is to use or if you having problems using iNaturalist, just Email friendsafforestation@gmail.com and we can certainly arrange a zoom meeting with you about using iNaturalist!

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Eco-Quest :

Baker Area Eco-Quest

George Genereux Urban Regional Park Eco-Quest:

Genereux Park Eco-Quest

Check out the iNaturalist.pdf pamphlet!

There are also new eBird hotspots for the afforestation areas also for your bird sightings, and your bird counts!

We wish you luck with what you spy with your little eye.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.com
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas
Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven. And learn tranquility.”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Creative expression, whether that means writing, dancing, bird-watching, or cooking, can give a person almost everything that he or she has been searching for: enlivenment, peace, meaning, and the incalculable wealth of time spent quietly in beauty.”
-Anne Lamott

Sparrows and Frogs

What in the world do sparrows and frogs have to do with one another? Sparrows and Frogs?

So, did you study and study the pictures of sparrows and frogs up above to see what in the world sparrows and frogs have to do with one another?

Well, we will let you in on a little secret!

Saturday March 20 is World Sparrow Day

and … Saturday March 20 is also World Frog Day!

Both on the same day, go figure!?!?!

For our Tale It Outside WinterStaycation Challenges, can you tell us something else that sparrows and frogs have in common? Email us to let us in on the little secret! This is another one of those baffling and mystifying challenges!!! Can you rise to this challenge? Is there something, indeed, which sparrows and frogs have in common…Hmmmmm? Let us know!!! Remember to capture your sighting with a photograph on iNaturalist. Download the iNaturalist.pdf pamphlet

Sparrows: difficult to identify

When might you see a sparrow?

Those “Little Brown Jobs”

Little Brown Birds

World Sparrow Day March 20

Where are the frogs?

The Trilling of a Frog

Consider our wetlands, our rivers, our drinking water

Report your sightings of frogs on Frogwatch! Did you know that the Northern Leopard Frog and the Great Plains Toad are both species at risk in Saskatchewan?

We’re each single threads woven together in a tapestry God has created. Only he sees the full picture, but not even a sparrow falls without his knowing.”

Francine Rivers

YouTubePlaylist

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.com
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe BakerCharityTwitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas
Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

The UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

Use the UN Decade’s Visual Identity Make it your own

Spread the word about the UN Decade 

Let’s Bring Back Forests

Let’s Green Our Cities

“Sparrows were an interesting bird. They had dialects unique to each region they inhabited. If Waterton had a sound, it was the lonely sparrow, keening for its mate. The trill was peaceful, but melancholy.”

Danika Stone

Frogs love to stay in the swamps; let’s save them by saving their habitats –Source

Winter Bird Feeders

Feeding birds in the winter time can provide a source of enjoyment for many people. The observation of a variety of birds is amazing to experience as they find and come to the feeder station.

The Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. Winter Staycation Brochure  (download)  provides a listing of those winter birds who may frequent the bird feeders in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Whether you are a novice or experienced bird watcher, it is a delight to see the flight of the black-capped chickadee arriving at the bird feeder. The chickadee does not swoop straight in an undulating or bouncing flight pattern. If one was to describe it on a piece of paper, it may look like a sine wave with curves up and down. The call or song of the black-capped chickadee is quite distinctive as a chickadee-dee-dee-dee. Though it will vary in their spring territory call which is a long high note followed by two lower short notes.

Besides the black-capped chickadee, the northern flicker is common in the afforestation area as is the bohemian waxwing. There is for sure the possibility the chance of seeing plethora of species depending on your time for observation, the weather, and when you arrive during the day.

Place a bird feeder in a site sheltered and protected from strong winter blizzard winds. The bird feeder should have a large canopy to keep snow and ice away from the bird seed placed out. Think of bird predators and squirrels who may also enjoy lunch at the bird feeder. If the bird feeder is placed near natural cover which will assist perching birds assess the bird feeder station area for safety.

Clean the bird feeder regularly. Bird balls and suet feeders also provide nutritious snacks for wild birds. Black oil sunflower seeds provides fat to birds which is a necessary nutrient. Birds require extra fat to keep them going through the long cold days. This bird feed may attract a good variety of birds. Nyger seeds, sunflower seeds and peanuts are also winter bird feeder choices. Try filling different locations of bird feeders with different seed to see what species of birds are attracted to the change of food.

As you embark on a winter bird feeding strategem, remember that some species of worms are meat eaters, seeking out insects, grasshoppers worms over the other months. A winter surprise of mealworms may provide the wild birds with a treat. Fruit is enjoyed by many birds. Placing out apples, bananas citrus fruits may be enjoyed by your several bird visitors. Consider spreading some peanut butter on an apple and add bits of peanuts and raisins. Remember to not place such a treat where dogs would reach it, as dogs cannot have raisins or they will have seizures.

In 2021 February experienced a terrific arctic cold front setting records with -53 Celsius records. At times like these, it is vitally important to keep any bird feeders topped up which birds may have become dependent upon.

Some birds are more comfortable feeding from the ground. Think of what other animals may be nearby which may pose a hazard to the birds feeding from the ground. Once in a while step on the snow at the base of the bird feeder, to provide ease of access to the ground feeding birds.

Partipate in the Christmas Bird Count and the Backyard Bird Count February 12-15, 2021 Register your count on the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Areas E-bird hotspot, Baker Area Eco-Quest on iNaturalist or on the Cornell Lab Audubon web pages.

As part of the winter-staycation challenges, register for the prize draw by sending in your photograph of a bird feeding station visitor.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.com
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas
Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“It is not so much for its beauty that the forest makes a claim upon men’s hearts, as for that subtle something, that quality of air that emanation from old trees, that so wonderfully changes and renews a weary spirit.”

— Robert Louis Stevenson

And into the forest I go, to lose my mind and find my soul.     

John Muir

CBC Christmas Bird Count

The Christmas Bird Counts are scheduled by Saskatoon Nature Society for Saskatoon, in conjunction with Audubon’s 119th Christmas Bird Count which takes place between the dates of Friday, December 14, 2018 through Saturday, January 5, 2019.

 

In the city, Stan Shadick of the Saskatoon Nature Society will lead the Christmas Bird Count on December 26, 2018

Christmas Bird Count for Kids will take place Thursday, December 27, 2018 by Greg Fenty out at Beaver Creek

If you are busy on those days, take part in the Christmas Bird Count out at Pike Lake
Saturday, January 5, 2019 led by Murray Morgan

Pop out to the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and George Genereux Urban Regional Park before Saturday, January 5, 2019, and take note of any sightings for a Christmas Bird Count locally, and record your sightings on e-bird!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

Song of the Air

Clouds

The song of a bird is not a reminiscence,
… but an anticipation, and expresses happiness or joy.
The day being bright and mild, with great masses of white cloud in the sky.
Can you see the melting away of the cloud into the clean air at the fringe of its edges and here, and now,
Have you caught the tune of the warbler?
A singular medley of notes, hurried chirps,
trills, calls, warbles.
And there to seek with eyes that glisten for the bird in song;
No doubt at all about the superior quality of the song.
Stop, shhh, quiet, listen the song oft repeated and prolonged.
It is a ringing, animated strain, silvern and golden.
And the blackbird with its lilt and only a few bars of its song, Enough to satisfy of the surprising quality of the strain.
High up on the tall tree the red breasted thrush was pouring out his song, and filling the woods with melody.
The sun now high and warm, with hardly a cloud in the sky; and yonder a mist,
Such full-throated harmony and long-drawn cadences.
Melody, tenderness, and plaintiveness.
And in the rising veil of radiant cloud,as Keats once said;
“And with thee fade away into the forest dim.”

 

Saskatchewan Birding Atlas

What is the best way to protect the native songbirds of Saskatchewan, plant a native tree!  As main aim of Richard St. Barbe Baker is ‘ to develop a tree sense in every citizen, and to encourage all to plant, protect and love their native trees; for forestry is among the oldest and most honourable of the peaceful arts of men, and in its practice is unselfish and constructive service.’ ”

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain. ” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

 

Unmoored by the Wind?

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Yellow-headed Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus)
Yellow-headed Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus)

“Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.” —Albert Einstein

 

The Yellow-headed Blackbird is amazingly sure of foot, even when perched upon swaying cattails. Though they appear delicately perched upon the the heads of the cattail, which disintegrate into a cottony fluff from which the seeds disperse by wind, the yellow-headed Blackbird, stays his post, and is not unmoored.

“Let us heal the naked scars in the earth and restore her green mantle. Let us set our Earth family in order”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

“We feel that our greatest victory remains to be won when man will realize his oneness with the trees, the creatures and with all living things, not ours to destroy, but to be handed on for the enjoyment of future generations.” – Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

True friends and effective co-worker

There are little nuthatches prone to run up and down the tree trunks, and yet we may contrast the masters of this mode of life – the woodpeckers. The woodpeckers with their toes paired, two forward and two backward, their stiff tail props, their slender wiry necks and their stout beaks, are set apart as the bark dwellers par excellence. We may first be alerted to the presence of the woodpecker with the resonant tattoo upon the tree trunks, but yet they have each their own distinct bird call.

The pert, comely and invaluable bird designated in science as Picus Villosus Linnaeus, though known in general parlance simply as the hairy woodpecker, or “sap-sucker,” has been variously portrayed by those attempting his biography.

In the present instance, our purpose is merely to adduce some bona fide observations gleaned during the past few seasons in the afforestation areas. The close resemblance existing between the hairy and the downy woodpecker (Picus pubesceus Linnaeus) in plumage, contour and habit is often noted. The exercise of proper care, even by the beginner, will obviate such confounding of the cousins. The former averages 23 to 25 cm -(9-10 inches) in length, the latter only 15 to 16.5 cm-(6-6 1/2 inches), so that one may quite readily detect the “hairy” by his superior size. There are other well-defined distinctions, but that alluded to answers general purposes with little chance for error.

A beneficent Providence has richly endowed the family of woodpeckers with qualities of rare excellence and worth. Especially this is true of the hairy. His is a work of destruction and death – the dislodgment and consuming of myriads of borers, &c. – not harm to the tree, but beneficial, as attested in innumerable instances. We have a true friends and effective co-worker.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park are home to woodpeckers, they can be sighted and heard pecking on the trees. Among the various species which may be found are the Northern Flicker Colaptes auratus, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Sphyrapicus varius, Hairy Woodpecker Picoides villosus, Downy Woodpecker Picoides pubescens, Black-backed Three-toed Woodpecker or Arctic three-toed woodpecker Picoides arcticus, American three-toed woodpecker Picoides dorsalis, and Pileated Woodpecker~uncommon~ Dryocopus pileatus. Of these, only the Northern Flicker, Hairy and Downy Woodpecker are common, the remaining are uncommon, and are a sight to behold!

Prairie Forest Virtual App Programming by

Gratitude goes out to

Mel Franciz Andes
Jonah Barrett
Brady Warford
Erik Froc
Jonah Barrett
Jordan Rekunyk
Justin Waselyshen
Mel Franciz Andes
Jeremiah Corda
Riley Chometa
Sarah Radke

Computer Systems Technology students
Saskatchewan Polytechnic under Instructor Wade Lahoda

Interpretation; Charles Keeler; A.G. Van Aken; Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

To submit interpretive stories to the editor Contact friendsafforestation@gmail.com

Support

The Song of the Blue Jay

Whether you will or no, you cannot escape acquaintance with the jays – the big crested blue-fronted jays that call and shout and make merry in the pines, that descend upon you around and about as your walk with insolent nonchalance and help themselves to your snacks without so much as by your leave, that flirt and quarrel with one another by turns, and fight with every other bird passer-by. They are gay and careless vagabonds, yet withal captivating with their very audacity. The fore front of the body is of a dark sooty brown color, the rear parts are dark blue, lit up by a brighter shade of blue on the black-barred wings and tail, and with streaks of blue on the blackish-brown head.

Possibly many who read the title “the song of the Blue jay” will think that they glimpse in it a lurking sarcasm, as they recall the notes which usually announce the presence of the “screaming jay,” for comparatively few bird students or writers upon bird songs seem to be aware of the Blue Jay’s best musical performances.

Blue Jays are numerous, and a number have spoken of the Blue Jay song to which I refer, describing it as sweet, tender, and quite lovely; delivered, they asserted, with a retiring modesty not perceptible in the Blue Jay’s deportment on other circumstances.

One day, while walking, we heard a song unlike any of the common birds with which we were familiar; it was not loud nor ringing, nor at all like whistling, but the notes were formed into a sweet and somewhat complex bird melody. All paused to listen, and it required from us only a lifting of the eyes to discover the singer, a Blue Jay perching on the lowest branch of a pine tree.

Whereas many yield descriptions of the Blue Jay and their calls, and they cite, that the Blue Jay attempts nothing that we can call a song, but rather a loud, screaming, harsh jay, jay; often whistling calls and imitations of the notes of other birds, particularly of common hawks.

However, it is also noted that the Blue Jay is conspicuous as a musician. He exhibits a variety in his notes and occasionally a beauty and a harmony in his song for which few give him credit.

Do the Blue Jay’s crude efforts at mimicry indicate a craving for more power in the realm of sound and melody, and is Nature evolving an original song for him through desire, or are we becoming aware that a bird singer has been modestly hiding his talent throughout the centuries behind a camouflage of swagger airs and teasing screams?

George Genereux Pamphlet Checklist breeding season and trails

Prairie Forest Virtual App Programming by

Gratitude goes out to

Mel Franciz Andes
Jonah Barrett
Brady Warford
Erik Froc
Jonah Barrett
Jordan Rekunyk
Justin Waselyshen
Mel Franciz Andes
Jeremiah Corda
Riley Chometa
Sarah Radke

Computer Systems Technology students
Saskatchewan Polytechnic under Instructor Wade Lahoda

Interpretation; Charles Keeler; Isabel Goodhue; Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

To submit interpretive stories to the editor Contact friendsafforestation@gmail.com

Support

Bird Life of the Afforestation Areas

It is amazing to learn how many Saskatoon residents are ignorant of the fact that their city possesses two large afforested urban regional parks. The naturalized habitat of the exotic planted species have created a unique mixed wood boreal-like forest on the prairies where one fails to know this, one thousand are ignorant of that unexplored semi-wilderness habitat of the 326 acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the 147.8 acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park.

Amid the splendour of the forests of spruce and pine, where the West Swale wetlands meanders peacefully, let us, in all friendliness, seek out a few of these happy choristers, that we may know one another when next we meet.

Early and late rings out the monotonous cadence of the robin’s flute, sounding like a snatch of one of Schumann’s arabesques. Who does not know the robin, with his prim air of opulency, his brisk hop, his hearty call? If you have never been introduced, by all means look him up. In size he comes between a sparrow and a dove, and his earth-red breast will reveal his identity. His back is slate-coloured, the head and tail darkening to blackish; his throat is white, streaked with black, and the belly is plain white. We may even have the good luck to find his wife in the mud-plastered straw nest, setting upon her blue eggs, or busy satisfying her clamouring brood. Her colors are duller than those of the male robin, but similar. When the young first put forth their feathers, they are speckled somewhat after the fashion of their near cousins, the thrushes.

But we cannot expect you to make acquaintance with all the birds of the afforestation area wilds at one sitting. Patience and loving kindness are the watchwords for those who would be initiated in nature lore. When next you go the the afforestation areas, you will find the majestic splendor of elms, and poplars humanized, and brought closer to your heart by meeting there a host of glad-voiced friends, familiar habitants of this wonder-vale, children of the air, and the forests, who will sing to you each his own love song – tender, wild and shy. And above them all you will listen to the hymn of the robin chanting his soulful and wistful melodies as the purple shadows of the trees darken across the forests of enchantment. Then as the pale stars brighten, and the dark violet sky deepens in the dusk of night, as the last flutter of joyous wings is stilled, you may think of ten thousand mothers fondly brooding over their swinging cradles in the pines as the night wing croons them a lullaby, each with her little mate close beside her, trustfully sleeping in all that wilderness and taking no thought of the fears of the morrow.

How many birds do you know which (a) spend only the summer (b) spend only the winter (c) stay all the year, in the afforestation areas? For these various types of birds, state upon which food the bird most depends.

George Genereux Pamphlet Checklist breeding season and trails

Richard St. Barbe Baker Pamphlet Checklist breeding season and trails

Richard St. Barbe Baker Pamphlet Checklist waterfowl

Wetlands bird checklist Pamphlet

Self-guided tour pamphlet winter bird checklist and trails

Prairie Forest Virtual App Programming by

Gratitude goes out to

Mel Franciz Andes
Jonah Barrett
Brady Warford
Erik Froc
Jonah Barrett
Jordan Rekunyk
Justin Waselyshen
Mel Franciz Andes
Jeremiah Corda
Riley Chometa
Sarah Radke

Computer Systems Technology students
Saskatchewan Polytechnic under Instructor Wade Lahoda

Interpretation; Hubert Dyer; Charles Keeler; Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

To submit interpretive stories to the editor Contact friendsafforestation@gmail.com

Support