Winter Birds

Feed the Birds Day.
February 3

This day is celebrated when the winter is coldest, and the winter snow has set in to encourage feeding of birds outside. In these colder winter months, the birds are in need of energy, and food is scarce as cold weather progresses.

There are a few methods to feed birds, which is not too overwhelming.  One is feeding them from your hands, another is to plant suitable trees and shrubbery and finally set out a do it yourself feeder designed in a multitude of fashions, or store bought. How to choose the right kind of bird feeder is an important consideration for the types of birds in your habitat.

How do you know what are the types of birds in your particular neck of the woods? Checking out Habisask (Hunting, Angling and Biodiversity Information of Saskatchewan) is an online species mapping application showing historical data. Another resource is Saskatchewan E-bird, the E-bird hotspots map or check out common migratory patterns, and dates for typical observation times for species in your area.

If you set out a feeder in the winter months, it is imperative to check it regularly. The birds’ very survival rely on this source of food once they get used to it being there.

A very simple, and spontaneous bird feeder is to strew along the top of horizontal tree branches fruit, suet, wheat, corn, sunflowers, sand, grit or store bought bird food for wild birds.

Richard St. Barbe Baker founded the “Men of the Trees” international foundation which is now known as the International Tree Foundation has three tenets for followers;

  • protect the native forest
  • plant ten native trees each year
  • take care of trees everywhere

For those choosing to follow in the footsteps of Richard St. Barbe Baker, and plant trees, select for “Feed the Birds Day” those plants which will best supply the seeds and nutrients the local birds need. The Land Manager’s Guide to Grassland Birds of Saskatchewan provides a template of birds and what types of food they require.

Another very important task to investigate is to search out anything in the wetlands or urban regional park which harm the bird’s environment. The landscape and the native flora can be harmed by chemicals spilled, oils, or any other wastes which don’t belong in a wetland and riparian forest ecosystem. By removing harmful contaminant, those birds feeding naturally in their native spaces are protected by your conservation efforts.

So, step up, and do your part during Feed the Birds Day this Februrary 3!  Attached are some links so this task is not overwhelming, but is enjoyable, and quite rewarding. Feed the birds not only today, but everyday, and get to know your feathered friends.

He that planteth a tree is a Servant of God
He provideth a Kindness, for many generations
and faces he hath not seen shall bless him.
Who so walketh in solitude, And inhabiteth the wood,

Choosing light, wave, rock and bird.

Before the money-loving herd.
Unto that forester- shall pass,
From these companions, power and grace.

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Alger, Bonnie. Feed the Birds Day. Treehugger.

Banks, Shelley. Regina Backyard Birds: Finches, Sparrows, Siskins. Prairie Nature. April 2015.

Bird Feeding. Hinterland Who’s Who. HWW. Environment and Climate Change Canada & Canadian Wildlife Federation

Bird Watching in Saskatchewan Whatbird

Bradbury, Kate. Garden Birds and Feed the Birds Day. Wildlife Blog Gardener’s World.

Briere, Karen. Feeding Program helps birds endure tough winter. March 1994. Western Producer.

Bumstead, Pat. Its Feed the Birds Day Birds Calgary.

Byron, Greg. What should you put out to feed birds during the winter? Bird Canada. Jan 16, 2013

DIY Bird Feed. Living Naturally with Kids. Rainy Day Mum.

Feed the Birds Day Holiday Insights

Feed the Birds Day Video on The Guardian.

Feed the Birds Day. Gardeners Network.

Feeding Birds in Winter. Prairie Birder. November 9, 2012.

Flowers, Frankie. How to Attract Birds to your Garden in Winter. HOme and Garden. Canadian Living. 2017 TVA Group

How to Help Birds in Winter. How to Attract a Greater Variety of Foods. Wild Birds Unlimited. Saskatoon, SK.

How to choose the right kind of bird feeder. Cornell Lab of Ornithology. April 2009

Inviting Birds to your Garden. Landscapes Saskatchewan.

Land Manager’s Guide to Grassland Birds of Saskatchewan. [with Key Identification Features, Species Range Maps, Identification Charts, and Bird Diet] Saskatchewan Watershed Authority. formerly Saskatchewan Wetland Conservation Corporation. ISBN 1-896-793-29-0. Regina. Saskatchewan.

Nature Counts. A Partner of Avian Knowledge Network. Bird Studies Canada.

Porter, Diane. Bird Feeding in the Winter Birdwatching.com

The RSPB Feed the Birds Day The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

RSPB Feed the Birds Day. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

Saskatchewan Breeding Bird Atlas. Saskatchewan Conservation Data Centre.

Saskatchewan Breeding Bird Atlas. Bird Studies Canada, Saskatoon, SK

Saunders, Nick. Feeding the Wildlife at Pike Lake Saskatchewan Birds and Nature. November 2008

Your Winter Backyard Bird Guide Nature Conservancy of Canada.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“According to ancient mythology, trees were the first living things on earth. This is borne out by scientific reasoning which shows that it is through them that the air we breathe can give life to humanity. Through countless ages trees have been drawing carbonic acid gas from the atmosphere, absorbing and incorporating the carbon, assimilating it; then when they die, bequeathing to soil their carboniferous remains. The consequence has been that eventually the atmospheric oxygen was left sufficiently pure for the requirements of birds and mammals which have replaced the flying reptiles and monstrous amphibians that were able to endure the heavy air of primeval swamps and jungles.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

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Wanted: Squirrels

Squirrel Appreciation Day

Your Squirrel Sightings Are Needed

American Red Squirrel Baby
American Red Squirrel Baby Courtesy Dan Leveille

Would you believe it, Monday January 21st, 2019 is Squirrel Appreciation Day! On the SciStarter web site there is a squirrel campaign! All you have to do is have an interest in nature, be able to identify a squirrel (Sciuridae), and report your sighting. The squirrel family includes ground squirrels, flying squirrels (Pteromyini or Petauristini), marmots (genus Marmota), prairie dogs (genus Cynomys), groundhogs (Marmota monax) and chipmunks (family Sciuridae.)   At the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area because of the diversity, woodland and grassland ecosystems, these furry little friends abound hoarding the Scots Pine Pine Cones, and snacking down on Colorado Blue Spruce cones. It is a squirrel haven! Help biologists by becoming a citizen scientist, and increase the data and information on the urban squirrel.

Additionally, biologists are seeking information on white squirrels. If you have seen a rare white squirrel, scientists are particularly keen to learn more about their habitat and ecology. Find out more about White Squirrel Mapping project.

Researchers are also studying the colour morphing of grey squirrels to black and why this is happening. This species is mainly found along the east coast of North America, however they have been found world wide. Keep you eyes open, and see if this squirrel’s range has extended into the prairies, and if these little squirrels scamper up and down the trees at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Squirrel Mapper will provide more information.

Out of the 262 species of squirrels found in Canada, there are several species of rodents (rodentia; gnawing mammals) in Saskatchewan, and of these, there are the Richardson’s ground squirrel (Urocitellus richardsonii), which may be seen in as colonies on the prairie grasslands. The Franklin’s ground squirrels also known as bush gophers are solitary mammals who enjoy the habitat of the parklands. The Franklin’s ground squirrel (Poliocitellus franklinii) once extremely abundant in the prairies, is seeing a decline in population due to a loss of environment. Additionally in Saskatchewan we spot the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), also nick named the striped gopher. The Northern Pocket Gopher, (Thomomys talpoides) loves the prairie grasslands feasting on clover, dandelion, and goldenrod and will avoid rocky and wet clay-like soil for their underground burrows.

The Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger) has also made appearance in our province over the last 40 years. These are the largest species of tree squirrels which live in North America. The Fox Squirrel is an omnivore, which means it eats the typical nuts, seeds and berries, but will also forage on insects, caterpillars, and young birds These fox squirrels love the elm, balsam poplar, and green ash which are afforested at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and these little rodents will spend the summer gathering food, burying it in the soil in caches for the winter moths. Be careful not to confuse the more common American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) with the fox squirrel. The American Red squirrel is smaller and has the characteristic reddish fur with a white venter (underbelly). The Red Squirrel loves to feast on seeds and nuts, loving mature forests with especially the spruce, Scotch pine, which is abundantly afforested in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, however Red squirrels also have a taste for berries, flowers, insects, smaller mammals, young birds and eggs.

The Northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) has a range which will make sighting in Saskatoon possible, and they happen to love mixed conifereous forests, however you will have to be keen, as they are nocturnal (active at night).

The Groundhog (Marmota monax), or woodchuck’s range, is throughout north eastern United States, carrying over through Canada, which makes sighting one of these very possible. Also called the Canada Marmot or Thickwood badger, loves to feast on Alfalfa, and lives alongside forest clearings. They are able to climb trees for safety.

So next time you are out walking and enjoying the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, take along your camera, and try to spot one of the many species of squirrels in Saskatchewan, and report your sightings!

American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus)
American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) Courtesy D. Gordon E. Robertson

Truly, squirrels, indeed, would agree with Richard St. Barbe Baker, “You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover.”

Please comment on your squirrel sightings on this web page, or send in your photographs! Do you have a squirrel story to tell?

Send in your squirrel photos to the SWOLRA or the Richard St. Barbe Baker facebook pages! Facebook: StBarbeBaker Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Facebook: South West OLRA

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Banks, Shelley. Fox Squirrel in Regina, Saskatchewan. Prarie Nature~ Saskatchewan Birds, Nature, Scenery. February 15, 2013.

Natural Neighbours Selected Mammals of Saskatchewan ISBN 9780889771239. 2001. University of Regina Press.

Ferron, Jean. Squirrel. Canadian Encyclopedia. Feb 7, 2006.

Schowalter, Tim. Rodents Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Centre. University of Regina. 2006.

University of Regina. Canadian Plains Research Center Title Selected Mammals of Saskatchewan. Volume 1 of Discover Saskatchewan series: Natural neighbours Volume 1 of Natural neighbours. Editor Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management. author of text accompanying photos Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management. Edition illustrated
Publisher University of Regina Press, 2001. ISBN 0889771235, 9780889771239.

Wikipedia: Richardson Ground Squirrel | Eastern Gray Squirrel | Flying Squirrel | Chipmunk | Prairie Dog | Ground Squirrel | Tree Squirrel | Fox Squirrel | Franklin’s Ground Squirrel | Northern Flying Squirrel | Thirteen-lined ground squirrel

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Governance and Finance, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Richard St. Barbe Baker, “You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover.”

Wild Vision Designing

What is your new year’s resolution?

“We sited all the buildings on site, by hand.  Believe it or not, some designers will draw a footprint on a plan, and the contractor will lay the structure out on the site and just build it.  A better way to do it is to stand on the site with the drawings, look for places where you can avoid major trees and watercourses, put flags in the ground where you want buildings to go, get the flags surveyed, and make any adjustments to avoid significant trees or patches.” Margie Ruddick page 157

In a city owned afforestation area, can you recognize these animal footprints?

 

“When faced with a project where that sense of place- the sense of a landscape as part of a larger water world, for instance – has been lost, it sometimes helps to start with just the idea of place and see what we can do to restore that.  This kind of visioning process may lead to the actual restoration of a riparian landscape.” Margie Ruddick page 113

 

“Okay, I thought, we are all “designing green,” but unless we completely change the way we live, the landscape as we know it is not going to survive.  Much as my profession might spend its time trying to make beautiful places for people to connect with nature and each other, we are still totally steeped in the culture of consumerism, held back by our own bad habits.” Margie Ruddick page 34

“I have started to make the connection between being wild and delving deeper into what it means to be environmentally oriented.  I am starting to believe that there is something about how unruly our process is, how rich and full of life our landscapes can be, that points us toward environmental health.  It has less to do with thinking about best practices in our heads than with experiencing wildness on a physical level…It is the messy undergrowth beneath the trees that allows life to thrive; life happens in the places you do not keep well manicured and chemically treated. ” Margie Ruddick page 34

 

“What are the measurable effects of designing wild landscapes, beyond just appealing to people like me?  There are three key perceived benefits to making wild landscapes.  One is obviously the habitat they provide for species other than humans.  Another is a benefit to humans and wildlife: the way in which wild landscapes promote stewardship.” Margie Ruddick page 35

 

“We have to remember that the end product of all our work is pleasure in our surroundings, relief from stress, and connection to something bigger than ourselves…Once your have shifted into the mindset that does not isolate what is wild from what is design, the beauty of each species seems as intentional as the most formal of gardens.  Bringing these two scales together – the scale of the designed landscape and the scale of a single species – is our challenge for the next decades.” Margie Ruddick page 230

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park are amazing forested areas.  Learn more as the City of Saskatoon, and surrounding area  developed by the Partnership for Growth P4G partners move forward growing to 1/2 million people. P4G is made up of a collaboration between the Cities of Saskatoon, Martensville and Warman, the Town of Osler and the RM of Corman Park #344.  ”

Saskatoon Growth Plan to Half a Million.”

City of Saskatoon future growth maps

P4G maps.

Bibliography:

Ruddick, Margie.  Wild by Design.  Strategies for creating life-enhancing landscapes.  Island Press. 2016

Planting and growing increasing quantities of trees is the scientific solution to Earth’s environmental dilemma.  Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

  The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain. Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Inner Conscience

World’s most endangered ecosystem
United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020

“Ask any Canadian kid to name the world’s most endangered ecosystem, and chances are you’ll hear one of the following answers: 1) rainforests; 2) coral reefs; 3) leave me alone.by Dan Kraus” However, the answer, from The International Union for the Conservation of Nature, declared temperate grasslands as the world’s most endangered ecosystem. Bob Peart Saskatchewan in the middle of Canada’s plains, is the home of the temperate grasslands.

What is biodiversity anyways?  “Bio” is a prefix meaning life as in plants and animals or flora and fauna. Diversity means a variety. Biodiversity, therefore is a mix of flora and fauna which includes species diversity, ecosystem diversity, and genetic diversity, and their interrelationship with each other as they don’t live in a vacuum.

Right now is the Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020. What are you doing to preserve Saskatchewan’ temperate grasslands, the world’s most endangered ecoystem? How are you caring for Canada’s Biodiversity? What can you do?

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is unique with riparian afforested mixed woodlands, native aspen bluffs, the Chappell marsh wetlands eco-system, and tall grass prairie ~ an amazing semi-wilderness wildlife habitat rich in biodiversity within the City of Saskatoon. And check out the neighbouring afforestation area formerly named George Genereux Park, and its bio-diversity.

1./  “Biodiversity education begins with learning. Discover the names of the trees, birds, native plants and insects that share” the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area.1

2./ “Once you know a little more, get out and experience the wonders of life’s diversity. Visit a local park. Take an afternoon hike through the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. 2

3./ “Do Something: Finally, get involved! Make changes to your lifestyle which reduce your impact on the planet, or become a ‘citizen scientist’ and join others in contributing to our collective understanding of the world around us!” Included in the bibliography are a plethora of sites ~ a literal swarm of activities to get youth involved as a parent or a teacher, or perhaps you are  a kid or citizen scientist interested in saving the world around you.

Have you ever hugged a tree?
Hug a tree, and one day you will come to know
that it is not only that
you have hugged the tree
but that the tree also responds,
the tree also hugs you.
– Osho

BIBLIOGRAPHY: What can you do? Here are a few ideas….
Biodiversity. Environment. Government of Saskatchewan.

Biodiversity. 1996-2017 National Geographic Society.

Bug Blitz. A biodiversity workshop for kinds (Australia) Bugs aren’t for squishing, bugs are for appreciating. Love thy bug! Facebook page.

Biodiversity for kids NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Biodiversity in Saskatchewan. | What you can do Saskatchewan EcoNetwork.

Canada Youth Action Guide for Agenda 21 designed for young people, parents and educators. Carla Doucet, National Round Table on the Environment and Economy, and Student focus groups across Canada.

Children and Youth. Global Youth Biodiversity Network, Youth, Biodiversity and Sustainable Development Goals, Join the Green Wave One School, One Tree, One Gift to Nature! CBD Secretariat Convention on Biological Diversity.

Earth Rangers Saskatchewan initiatives. “Earth Rangers is a registered Canadian charity whose mission is to educate kids about the importance of biodiversity and empower them to protect animals and their habitat. ”

EcoLeague } Sustainability Classroom Resources at Resources for ReThinking Our Canada Project. 2017 Learning for a Sustainable Future. LSF

Ecology for Kids. Summer kids Camps. ” Kids will visit scientists, study rocks, fossils, plants, insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals and Saskatchewan Endangered Species, and then undertake environmentally friendly projects to help them! ” University of Saskatchewan.

Homes on the Range: Conservation in Working Prairie Landscapes. Prairie Conservation and
Endangered Species Conference and Workshop 2007.

Kids Activities. “Water Watchdog Activities! Water Watchdog Origami Activity. Water Watchdog Word Find. Water Footprint, Water Detective. Play Catchment Detox! ScienceSeekers: Wetlands. Wetlands Activity! Biodiversity: A Data Discovery Game.” Partners FOR the Saskatchewan River Basin.

Kids Right To Know. One planet for all All for one planet. Environment Canada.

Gone Wild for Wildlife: Learning more about preserving Saskatchewan biodiversity | Gone Wild for Wildlife The Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Saskatchewan and the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Global News.

Just for kids Saskatchewan Burrowing Owl Interpretive Centre.

KAWS Animal Rescue. Because Kritters are Worth Saving!

Lesson Plans and Teacher Resources through the Green Classroom. Ausable Bayfield Conservation.

Macdonald, Cam. Where do you want to go birding in Saskatchewan today?
Mitchell, Kathi. Biodiversity for Kids Mrs. Mitchell’s Virtual School

Morrisey, Beth MLIS Biodiversity and Nature. Quizzes, puzzles, and activities. Ecofriendly Kids

Nature at work. Why Biodiversity is important to you. Environment Canada. Government of Canada.

Northeast Swale Northeast Swale Watchers

Peart, Bob. Life in a Working Landscape: Towards a Conservation Strategy for the World’s Temperate Grasslands. 2008 the International Union for the Conservation of Nature declared temperate grasslands as the world’s most endangered ecosystem. A Record of The World Temperate Grasslands Conservation Initiative Workshop Hohhot, China – June 28 & 29, 2008 August 2008.

On the Prairie – Games 2017 by the Native Plant Society of Saskatchewan.

Preserving Rare ecosystems and biodiversity in Canada. | Saskatchewan’s Underappreciated Trails Nature Canada.

Protecting Biodiversity. Endangered Species Legislation. Wildlife and Habitat. Issues. David Suzuki Organization.

Resources for Educators “Wetland Centres of Excellence. Project Webfoot. Earn Wetland Hero Status. Duck Detectives.” Ducks Unlimited.

Resources. School Ground Greening resources, Teacher’s Corner, Community greening resources, food growing resources, native plant database. Evergreen Canada.

Robin, Michael. Responsible pet ownership crucial to saving salamander and newt biodiversity “The fate of the world’s richest biodiversity of salamanders and newts is in the hands of pet owners across North America, said Natacha Hogan, an environmental toxicologist specializing in amphibians at the University of Saskatchewan. ” May 30, 2016. University of Saskatchewan.

Sage Grouse Initiative SGI Wildlife Conservation Through Sustainable Ranching. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) initiative.

Saskatoon Nature Society Kids in Nature Grant Program

Saskatoon Zoo Society. | Young Naturalists. Events for kids.

Saskatchewan’s Ecoregions Saskatchewan Conservation Data Centre

What is Biodiversity? Helping Biodiversity in your Own Backyard ~ create a Certified Wildlife Habitat! National Wildlife Federation.
What is biodiversity? Education and Awareness | What can you do? Biodiv Canada. The Canadian
Biodiversity Strategy. Government of Canada.

Dan Kraus, Dan. Why Canada’s Prairies are the world’s most endangered ecosystem. Land Lines The Nature Conservancy of Canada. October 24, 2016

Why is biodiversity so important Ted Ed 2011-2017 The Kid Should See This

Wild About Saskatoon Spring festival

Q: How is a dog and an ornithologist alike?
A: One wags a tail and the other tags a Gadwall (Waterfowl or Duck).

I pray to God that I remain to be just to the earth under my feet, to my neighbour, and my inner conscience”. Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Q: How did the herpetologist know he would be married soon? A: He caught the garter snake.

 

Green Network Study Area

What in the world is the P4G Green Network Study Area?

Well to start out with , the Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) is a collaborative which includes political and administrative representation from the following partnering municipalities: City of Saskatoon, Rural Municipality of Corman Park, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatoon Regional Economic Development Authority(SREDA) (Advisory Role)

Now then where is the Green Network Study Area located?

Green Network Study Area, south of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in the Rural Municipality of Corman Park, part of the Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth P4G planning area (partial map) adapted from the Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan map on page 26
Green Network Study Area, south of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in the Rural Municipality of Corman Park, part of the Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth P4G planning area (partial map) adapted from the Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan map on page 26

Page 45 of the Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan explores the concept of this green space, and the discussion is supplied in the aforementioned report explaining those aspects which are under additional review.

Basically the report states that, “the Green Network Study Area includes connected areas of wetlands, swales, natural areas, the South Saskatchewan River corridor, and other areas providing stormwater storage and conveyance, and recharge of groundwater supplies.”

This area will support the native flora and fauna of the area, thus encouraging wildlife to thrive and move about from the West Swale wetland areas through to the South Saskatchewan River.

According to the P4G report, there will be consideration given to both environmental and recreational activities in multi-functional green spaces.  This inter-connected open space system will supply opportunities for hiking, cycling, bird-watching, and other passive recreation activities within parks, open space, and protected areas.

Across the river, the green natural space marked on the map, as well, is Diefenbaker park.

Meewasin Valley Authority’s Maple Grove Conservation Area/ Leisureland and Yorath Island are both found within the Green Network Study Area on the west side of the South Saskatchewan River.  More about these areas follows.

Wikimapia reports on Maple Grove Conservation Area/ Leisureland as follows; ”

Maple Grove originally did not have a channel running through it. The quarter section of which Maple Grove is part of was intact when surveyed in 1903; however, the river channel meandered into the quarter section then deposited on the west edge forming Yorath island. This natural accretion allowed the owner of Maple Grove to retain title of the remainer of the quarter section on the island (very rare).

In the 1960s, Mr. Mike Egnatoff and his wife developed the area into an amusement park with a ferris wheel, trampolines, miniature golf, playground, train, playfields, and picnic facilities. In addition, they developed a dance hall with kitchen and concession. A campsite for trailers was developed which turned into a permanent mobile trailer park with 18 trailer units. The amusement park was known as Leisureland. It was very active for 20 years, then except for the group picnics, hall and trailer court, the area became inactive due to amusement competition in town. The Egnatoffs built a new house on the site close to the river and near the hall in the 1980s. In addition to the trailers and the one new house, there is a shack that is located south of the hall at the base of the west bank. This building is the only building site on the lower terrace that is above the 1:500 year flood line. A root cellar mini hall was built to service the catering hall near the entrance to the property. This building is currently being leased to a group of artists.”

Wikipedia has an article about Yorath Island, the confluence of the West Swale;
“Yorath is a small island, 151 acres (61 ha) in size, in the South Saskatchewan River just outside the southern boundaries of the city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The island is relatively new, and did not exist when the land was first surveyed in 1903. This island is managed by the Meewasin Valley Authority; it is not accessible by road (although some maps of the area plot a non-existent north-south grid road on the island), but can be seen from the Maple Grove (formally Leisureland) area. The island is named after Christopher J. Yorath, who in 1913 became the commissioner of Saskatoon.Yorath is best known for an extensive, forward-thinking planning document published in 1913 that proposed future residential and road layout for Saskatoon, and he originated the idea of the City developing an “Encircling Boulevard”; in 2013 this proposal came to fruition with the completion of the Circle Drive freeway project. Ironically, Yorath’s document proposed the Encircling Boulevard cross through what would later be named Yorath Island; the final Circle Drive passes to the north of the island, which is undeveloped save for a set of power lines that cross the river and the northern tip of the island.Within North America the Island is one of the farthest northern examples of a cottonwood forest. The island also support 23 different types of shrubs and a mixture of wildlife (including the Cooper’s Hawk, coyotes, red foxes, river otter, porcupine, beaver and deer)”

“The Meewasin Valley Authority entered to an agreement with the Leisureland  Community Co-operative Ltd. whereby the public use of certain lands (Maple Grove) owned by Meewasin is limited. The agreement was a condition of the purchase of the property by Meewasin and will expire December 31, 2022.” City of Saskatoon

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5   If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

The Province of Saskatchewan Motto:

Multis e gentibus vires (From Many Peoples Strength)

Has any one of us ever really seen a Tree? When we become aware of trees we may each glimpse of them to moments of spiritual vision and, identifying ourselves with the trees, become conscious of the rising of the sap; the upward thrust of life, leaf burgeoning, their consciousness of the changing seasons; we may share their passionately boisterous exuberance of life in the height of the storm, and their tranquility when at rest; with them we will enjoy the glad murmur of the ripening seed clusters when after weeks of drought the steady warm rain brings relief to thirst; and we will know that these creatures, our elder brethern, are intimately related to us in their love and hunger for life. We may even catch their enthusiasm and aspire heavenwards while still rooted in our Mother Earth and in communion with our fellow man and, tree-wise, strive to make the Earth more fruitful again.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

Mankind as steward of the biosphere

“Man’s life, in sickness and in health, is bound up with the forces of nature, and that nature, so far from being opposed and conquered, must rather be treated as an ally and friend, whose ways must be understood, and whose counsel must be respected.” ~Lewis Mumford. Page vii

“In the selection of areas intrinsically suitable for conservation, the factors selected were: features of historic value, high quality forests and marshes, bay beaches, streams, water-associated wildlife habitats, intertidal wildlife habitats, unique geological and physiographic features, scenic land and water features, and scarce ecological associations. “Page 107

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park, both provide historic value, high quality forests, unique geological features, scenic land, and scarce ecological associations.  Though, both are classified as wetlands, the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area features the permanent wetland of the Chappell Marsh with its water-associated wildlife habitats.

“The salient factors selected for determining recreation areas are:

Passive

  • Unique Physiographic Features
  • Scenic water features, streams
  • Features of historic value
  • High-quality forests
  • High-quality marshes
  • Scenic land features
  • Unique geologic features
  • Scarce ecological associations
  • Water-associated wildlife habitats
  • Field and forest wildlife habitats

Active

  • Bay beaches
  • Expanse of water for pleasure craft
  • Fresh water areas
  • Riparian lands
  • Flat land
  • Existing and potential recreation areas

Areas most suited for urbanization are determined separately for the two components of urbanization: residential and commercial-industrial developments.” Page 112

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park are both existing and potential recreation areas, are very much flat lands, feature field and forest wildlife habitats, comprise unique physiographic features, encompass high-quality forests, features of historic value, and unique geologic features.  The West Swale is a unique Pleistocene event which is unique and separate from the North East Swale. 

The most restrictive factors which are common to these developments are also identified:

  • Slopes
  • Forested areas
  • Poor surface drainage
  • Areas susceptible to erosion
  • Areas susceptible to flooding.” Page 113

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park are both areas susceptible to flooding, and both are amazing forested areas.  Learn more as the City of Saskatoon, and surrounding area  developed by the Partnership for Growth P4G partners moves forward to grow to 1/2 million. P4G is made up of a collaboration between the Cities of Saskatoon, Martensville and Warman, the Town of Osler and the RM of Corman Park #344.  “After much consultation with the public and their own administration, the City of Saskatoon approved its official Growth Plan to Half a Million.”~Kelly Macsymic Commercial Real Estate News 

City of Saskatoon future growth maps

P4G maps.

.  

“We need nature as much in the city as in the countryside.  In order to endure we must maintain the bounty of the great cornucopia which is our inheritance…It is not a choice of either the city or the countryside: both are essential, but today it is nature, beleaguered in the country, too scarce in the city which has become precious…Our eyes do not divide us from the world but unite us with it….Man is that uniquely conscious creature who can perceive and express.  He must become the steward of the biosphere.  To do this he must design with nature.” Page 5

“The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker

Bibliography:

McHarg, Ian L.  Design with Nature.  25th Anniversary Edition  John Wiley and Sons, Inc.  Toronto, ON, ISBN 0-471-55797-8, ISBN 0-471-11460-X Pbk.  1992

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5  To support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“It is not the land itself that constitutes the farmer’s wealth, but it is in the constituents of the soil, which serve for the nutrition of plants, that this wealth truly consists.”—Liebig.

 

Rethinking Boundaries

“Rethinking Boundaries.

The issues of who owns what, and off site issues such as noise, have a huge impact on the way a site can work as a landscape.  The way in which a site has been defined should be kept in mind when any project starts…Our work, more often than note, is about how people use spaces, how they live in  places, what they do, how they walk, dance, play, and rest.  Designing for people has the added benefit of empowering a proprietary population, people who will not only care about but care for the landscape.”  Ruddick, Margie.  Wild by Design.  Island Press.  Washington. 2016

Neault Road & the Afforestation Areas: The area around George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be surrounded by rural commercial/industrial growth according to the P4G plans. (source and map page 26-27)  What is a rural commercial/industrial area?

“The Rural Commercial/Industrial category accommodates general commercial and industrial uses, including lightly-serviced industrial, storage, and commercial areas that require a large land base. This area shall be differentiated into Rural Commercial and Rural Industrial areas through future planning” Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth Regional Plan May 2017

 George Genereux Urban Regional Park is quarter section is 160 acres or one forth of a square mile which is a very very small amount of land in comparison to the massive number of sections under review and planning currently.(source and map page 26-27)

The land surrounding George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area) as previously mentioned is rural commercial/industrial area and takes up approximately 11 quarter sections of land (See map)- so how will the land planning affect the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation area)? (source and map page 26-27)

How will the city of Saskatoon and greater metropolitan area tackle the particular benefits of the George Genereux urban regional park?  How will the George Genereux Urban Regional Park be preserved in perpetuity, as per the 1972 proclamation by the City of Saskatoon during this next phase of expansion?  As the population of the greater metropolitan area designs ever increasing land masses for commercial, industrial, and residential, where sill the quarter section of land afforested end up?

Did you know that trees, forests, and afforestation areas do help protect you from carcinogens!!!!  So in the middle of a rural commercial/industrial area, the George Genereux Urban Regional Park would mitigate harmful emissions which arise from rural industrial activities.  As rural and urban residents the information from long range planning provides a safer and healthier space for everyone to live and reside.  Building our urban forest is an amazing testament to both the city and the P4G planners.

“Our green space is more than just beautiful – it provides an abundance of ecological services. Purifying the air we breathe and the water in which we swim and drink are but a few examples. The cumulative benefits of these life-sustaining services provided by the urban canopy have been valued at more than $80-million annually. Ecological services such as these help to remediate some of the negative health effects brought on by industrial activities and the resulting pollution.  ”
Prevention as the cure: How trees help protect you from carcinogens

Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth (P4G) includes the City of Saskatoon, the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, City of Martensville, Town of Osler, City of Warman, Saskatchewan Regional Economic Development Authority (SREDA).  The P4G meets in the effort to expand the city of Saskatoon, and surrounding environs to  between 273,000 and 301,000 by 2020; 302,000 and 349,000 by 2025; 333,000 and 405,000 by 2030; and between 368,000 and 470,000 by 2035.  (source) As a matter of fact Saskatoon eyes 1M population in 50 years.

“The prescription for this new global market economy is to rob federal governments of all legitimate roles in setting standards, whether for the health of the people or the environment. Deregulation and decentralization become dominant policy since all regulations are viewed as violations of the freedom of the market. Laws protecting wildlife, natural resources like forests, or for that matter, the quality of air, water and soil, or the integrity of biodiversity, are viewed as unacceptable obstacles in the part of the market’s role in mediating all matters. Still another aspect of the new global order is privatization. The private sector is to be trusted to apply the laws of the marketplace to all matters social and environmental. The test for response to toxins in our environment is to measure the harm of continued use against the alleged greater economic harm of a ban, even if the substance is a carcinogen, the benefits being easier to quantify than the harm, when it involves human pain and suffering. ” Knelman, F.H. , Ph.D.  The Sociology of Health The Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine Vol. 11, 3rd Quarter 1996 

 

 

“The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5  To support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

With spirit we are all children of the cosmos; Without it we are orphaned and adrift.
Deepak Chopra

 

“what we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another” Mahatma Gandhi.