Joy and Inspiration

UNESCO World Teachers’ Day

5 October 2018

“Education is improving the lives of others and for leaving your community
and world better than you found it.”  Marian Wright Edelman

Given a teacher with a love of out-of-door life, with observant eyes and ears, and the spirit that sympathizes with children’s curiosity and stimulates inquiry, Nature Study will be a joy and an inspiration to pupils.

 

“Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.”  William Wordsworth

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

 

Nature is man’s teacher.
She unfolds her treasure to his search,
unseals his eye, illumes his mind,
and purifies his heart;
an influence breathes from all the sights and sounds
of her existence.  Alfred Billings Street

 

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What is an afforestation area?

From water and earth we came, and the future of mankind on this planet will be determined by respectful or disrespectful treatment of these basic elements. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

The present is full of opportunity. Never before in the history of the planet has mankind been given the privileges and opportunities that are at his disposal today. A great light has been raised and is penetrating the darkness of the world, but alas, too many with dust blinded eyes have yet to catch the vision. Some of us have. That is our privilege and our responsibility. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

What is an afforestation area?  Afforestation is the planting of trees upon land which have not contained trees previously.

Reforestation, on the other hand, is the reforestation of an existing forest which has been depleted usually because of deforestation.

Deforestation is the removal of a forest to make use of the land as farms, ranches, or neighbourhoods.

So in the case of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the Afforestation Area Formerly known as George Genereux Park, the lands were part of  the aspen parkland biome. Aspen parkland refers to a very large area of transitional biome between prairie and boreal forest.  Aspen parkland consists of groves of aspen poplars and spruce interspersed with areas of prairie grasslands, also intersected by large stream and river valleys lined with aspen-spruce forests and dense shrubbery. This is the largest boreal-grassland transition zone in the world and is a zone of constant competition and tension as prairie and woodlands struggle to overtake each other within the parkland.

Because of afforestation, the area possesses a miraculous, and fully established mixed wood forest featuring both deciduous and evergreen trees.  It is common in the Saskatchewan eco-system to not behold a mixed forest of this stature unless one is north of the tree line or at Cypress Hills park, as both these areas are at a higher elevation.  To have a mature mixed forest with gorgeous canopy, full understorey, rich and vibrant semi-wilderness wildlife habitat corridor along with wetlands inclusive of Chappell Marsh with emergent fauna  is a true blessing and good fortune within the boundary limits of the City of Saskatoon.  This is a tribute to the City of Saskatoon parks department and the great insight of a great man, named Bert Wellman Saskatoon Director of Planning and Development who had a vision for a green belt to embrace and grace Saskatoon.

From water and earth we came, and the future of mankind on this planet will be determined by respectful or disrespectful treatment of these basic elements. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Facebook: Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

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A Meeting

The greatest gift of all is life. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Richard St. Barbe Baker had a magical elixir. St. Barbe’s elixir was described by him as a type of rebirth, a connection to the trees, which he used for many years for their healing power.

I wandered on as in a dream, all sense of time and space lost. As I continued this mysterious journey, looking up every now and then I could see shafts of light where the sunshine lit up the morning mists and made subtle shadows on the huge bracken fronds which provided a continuous canopy of bright green over me. Their pungent scent was a delight to me. Although I could see only a few yards ahead, I had no sense of being shut in. The sensation was exhilarating. I began to walk faster, buoyed up with an almost ethereal feeling =of well-being, as if I had been detached from earth. I became intoxicated with the beauty around me, immersed in the joyousness and exultation of feeling part of it all.
I had entered the temple of the woods. I sank to the ground in a state of ecstasy; everything was intensely vivid ~ the call of a distant cuckoo seemed just by me. I was alone and yet encompassed by all the living creatures I loved so dearly.
As I lay back a dead twig snapped, like the crack of a whip; the birds warbling sounded like the notes of a cathedral organ. The overpowering beauty of it all entered my very being. At that moment my heart brimmed over with a sense of unspeakable thankfulness which has followed me through the years since that woodland re-birth. My gratitude for this cosmic experience can be perhaps best expressed in the Scot’s metrical version of the Twenty-third Psalm:

Goodness and mercy all my life,
Shall surely follow me;
And in God’s house very more,
My dwelling-place shall be. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For years, I charged my batteries on trees. You have to select a special tree friend. When I came out of hospital after a serious operation, I chose a Cedar of Lebanon. Cedar itself comes from the Arabic word meaning strength.
I used to do two minutes on and two minutes off, then two minutes again. After about four minutes, your hands being to tingle. I wouldn’t recommend to a beginner to take more than a minute to start with. ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker speaks of laying the pals of hands on a tree trunk.

A meeting was previously  held Wednesday March 29, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. for any and all Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (RSBBAA), the West Swale, and SW OLRA. If you are a user or stakeholder of the RSBBAA, or SW OLRA, please come to this very important meeting and listen to Hilary Gough, the honourable councillor for ward 2. Note the front doors of city hall are locked after hours.  Thank you kindly. It was good to see you.

Forests do have a healing power, a kind of elixir which St. Barbe speaks of to which we can all relate. It is this healing power which does wonders mitigating Nature Deficit Disorder, and replenishing the body with Vitamin N, a common deficiency in this era. Look foward to meeting with you, and speaking about the afforestation area, West Swale, the afforestation area formerly known as George Genereus Park and the SW OLRA

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

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“In the wealth of the woods since the world began The trees have offered their gifts to man.” – Henry van Dyke

The greatest gift of all is life. For millions of years the trees were paving the way for life on this planet, absorbing impurities, clearing up the foetid atmosphere and the swamp breath, absorbing carbon dioxide and giving off the life giving oxygen that
we breathe.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Water Programmes are Essential

I believe that water must be the basic consideration in all our national and earth- wide forest programmes. Streams and rivers must be returned to their natural motion. ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus
Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus winter colours
Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus breeding colours
Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus breeding colours

Horned Grebe

Podiceps Auritus is quite an amazing looking waterbird with yellow / white unique feathers behind its eyes tufted up to appear as “horns”, thus it name. This little bird is quite striking with black head, red eyes, and the white tufted ears bobbing along above a dark chestnut/black coloured body. These are the breeding colours when the Horned Grebe is all dressed up for show and courtship.

There are many books written nowadays which will tell you about birds as folk of the twentieth century see them. They describe carefully the singer’s house, his habits, the number of his little wife’s eggs, and the color of every tiny feather on her pretty wings. But these books tell you nothing at all about bird-history; about what birds have meant to all the generations of men, women, and children since the world began. You would think, to read the words of the bird-book men, that they were the very first folk to see any bird, and that what they think they have seen is the only matter worth the knowing.

Now the interesting facts about birds we have always with us. We can find them out for ourselves, which is a very pleasant thing to do, or we can take the word of others, of which there is no lack. But it is the quaint fancies about birds which are in danger of being lost. They show what the little feathered brothers have been to the children of men; how we have come to like some and to dislike others as we do; why the poets have called them by certain nicknames which we ought to know…~Abbie Farwell Brown

Nesting of the Horned Grebe will occur at a site in shallow water, most commonly amid wetlands flora alongside marshes. Breeding pairs most often choose sites in temperate zones of the Canadian prairies. The nests are made of wetlands plant material and anchored to the plants alongside freshwater marshes for concealment. Symbiosis played a major role in the co-evolution of the prairie marsh eco-system and the Horned Grebe.

Quite the jolliest season of the year, with the birds, is when they begin to require a home, either as a shelter from the weather, a defence against their enemies, or a place to rear and protect their young. May is not the only month in which they build their nests, some of our favorites, indeed, waiting till June, and even July; but as it is the time of the year when a general awakening to life and activity is felt in all nature, and the early migrants have come back, not to re-visit, but to re-establish their temporarily deserted homes, we naturally fix upon the first real spring month as the one in which their little hearts are filled with titillations of joy and anticipation.~C. C. Marble.

Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus Nesting
Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus Nesting

In winter, the Horned Grebe has a black crown, and a pale foreneck, cheeks and underparts, quite distinct from the showy breeding coloration. The Horned Grebe show up here in April, with the majority of sightings in May, June, and July. Sightings of the Horned Grebe continue on until November when they leave to the Aleutians and exposed shorelines of saltwater oceans to overwinter.

A grebe most resembles a small loon when it comes to waterbirds. Grebes in general are ducklike divers with lobed toes (not webbed feet) and sharp pointed bills. This little waterbird is quite fascinating to watch, at times diving down under the water as a loon, at other times just sinking down. The grebe will sit with its body much lower in the water than a duck.

The Horned Grebe needs to be on water to fly, and is not often seen on land. When not on the water, the Horned Grebe will maneuver awkwardly as a jumping and hopping motion, rushing across the surface of the water to gather up speed for flight.

Designated Special Concern by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada COSEWIC, “because over 90% of this bird’s breeding grounds are within Western Canadian wetlands, the continued destruction of marshes and waterways is a major threat to the survival of this species.”Nature Canada “Threats include degradation of wetland breeding habitat, droughts, increasing populations of nest predators (mostly in the Prairies), and oil spills on their wintering grounds in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. COSEWIC

“The global population has been declined by 30% over the last three decades and by 79% within North America. Within 1985 and 2001, grassland and wetland drainage amounted to 5% global habitat loss. Due to global declines, the Horned Grebe has been unlisted from least concern to vulnerable resulting in conservation and research action plans.*

According to the Ministry of the Environment, A breeding bird or breeding Grebe colony is protected May 15 through to July 15 of the year, foot traffic, and other low disturbances must maintain a distance of 100 meters. Medium disturbances such as vehicles and ATVs as well as high disturbances, roads, drilling both must maintain a distance of 200m from loons and any Colonial Nesting Grebes.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Nature Canada suggests:

  • “Tell elected officials that you support the protection of at least half of Canada’s Boreal forest.” “The eco-system of a forest is very fragile. It is very easily upset. This would be a fifth reason why tree cover should be maintained…It is not enough for a mayor to put on his chain and plant a tree but he must plant forest trees for our lives”~Richard St. Barbe Baker. The afforestation areas of Saskatoon are a vital heritage site, and a true testament to the Parks Department of Saskatoon.
  • Dan Kraus, Weston conservation scientist and senior director of conservation program development for the Nature Conservancy of Canada, writes about the temperate prairies, and the endangered grasslands ~ the World’s most endangered eco-system. So it certainly would not hurt to tell your elected officials that you support the protection as well, of the native grasslands of the West Swale, including those of the Afforestation area formerly known as George Genereux Urban Regional Park, and the native grasslands of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.
  • “When viewed in the context of our climate and geological history, it is evident that prairie wetlands are integral and irreplaceable parts of the Saskatchewan landscape.The challenge is to find a place for these wetlands in our social, economic and land-use systems – a place where their protection and conservation is assured by their inherent value.Managing Saskatchewan’s Wetlands” Is there not truly a great symbiosis between woodlands, grasslands and wetlands?
  • “Advocate for greater protection of Important Bird Areas (IBA) in your community and across the country.”  Do you consider Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, the West Swale, and the many and several wetlands around Chappell Marsh an important bird area? Chappell Marsh is huge, extending from Chappell Marsh Conservation Area managed by Ducks Unlimited, into Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area managed by the City of Saskatoon and the Meewasin Valley Authority.
  • “Learn more about IBAs.”
  • “Stay informed about endangered birds and other species”
  • “Thousands of volunteers have helped conserve Important Bird Areas by surveying bird populations, building nest boxes, erecting signs, removing invasive species, planting native grasses, and promoting awareness of the value of wildlife.”

What will you do?

From the account above, can you recognize the Horned Grebe, now on your travels into the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and around about the West Swale wetlands, the series of marshes alongside Chappell Marsh?

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

The elected officials are:

The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau,, P.C., M.P., Prime Minister of Canada, Ottawa

The Honourable Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Her Honour the Honourable Vaughn Solomon Schofield, S.O.M., S.V.M., Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan

Honorable Sheri Benson, Member of Parliament Constituency:Saskatoon West Email:Sheri.Benson@parl.gc.ca

The Honourable Brad Wall, Premier of Saskatchewan. Email premier@gov.sk.ca

Cabinet Minister
The Honourable Scott Moe, Minister of the Environment

Ms. Jennifer Campeau. Saskatchewan Party Saskatoon Fairview ~ representing the regions for the West Swale and Afforestation areas. Members of the Legislative Assembly. casaskatoonfairview@shaw.ca

His Worship Mayor Charlie Clark

Saskatoon City Councillors. Ward 2 – Councillor Hilary Gough and Ward 3 – Councillor Ann Iwanchuk

Shaping Saskatoon Email communications Division

I believe, therefore, that water must be a basic consideration in all our national and earth wide forest programmes. Streams and rivers must be restored to their natural motion and thus floods and droughts must be eliminated. Forests and woodlands are intimately linked with biological, social and spiritual well-being. I believe that the minimum tree cover for safety is l/3rd of the total land area of every country. Every catchment area should have at least this proportion of tree cover made of mixed species including the broad leaved trees” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Collins, Henry Hill Editor. Harper and Row’s Complete Field Guide to North American Wildlife. Harper and Row Publishers. New York. 1981. ISBN 0-06-181163-7 page 12.
Continuing Horned Grebe and Snow Buntings sullivancountybirder, Sullivan & Delaware County Birder’s Blog

COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Horned Grebe Podiceps Auritus. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. COSEWIC. 2009. COSEWIC assessment and status report on the Horned Grebe Podiceps auritus Western population and Magdalen Islands population, in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. vii + 42 pp.
(www.sararegistry.gc.ca/
status/status_e.cfm)

Audubon Mural Project 2016. New York, NY. Bird #20: Horned Grebe: Giannina Gutierrez. Aug 13, 2016 street artstreet artistsNew York

David Krughoff’s Horned Grebe Prairies North Magazine.

Horned Grebe v.s. Highways. CBC.ca The Afternoon Edition. [Saskatchewan Highways and infrastructure have run into a different kind of roadblock at the site of one of their construction projects: the Horned Grebe.]

Horned Grebe. All About Birds Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Horned Grebe Audubon Field Guide

October birding around Victoria on a wonderful weekend hazel, FOSSILS & FAUNA
Dec 4, 2016 birdsbcnature

Horned Grebe videos, photos, and facts. Podiceps auritus. |ARKive

Species Profile Horned Grebe Western population Species at Risk Public Registry. SARA Government of Canada.

Species Profile Horned Grebe Species at Risk Public Registry. SARA Government of Canada.

Horned Grebe Bird Web.

Horned Grebe: Life History All About Birds.

Horned Grebe Bird Watcher’s Digest.

Horned Grebe. Birdinginformation.com

Horned Grebe Wikipedia.

Peterson, Roger Tory. A Field Guide to Western Birds. A completely new guide to Field Marks of All Species Found in North America West of the 100th Meridian and North of Mexico. Peterson Field Guides. Third Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company Boston. 1990. ISBN 0-395-51749-4. page 26

Nature Canada ~ Horned Grebe Species Spotlight

Sibley, David Allen. Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Western North America. Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 2003. ISBN 0-679-45121-8. Page 30.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

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I believe that water must be the basic consideration in all our national and earth- wide forest programmes. Streams and rivers must be returned to their natural motion. What is a natural motion? A river flowing in its natural course comes to a bend. This gives it a spiral motion. It comes to a marrow, this provides tension. It broadens out, here is relaxation. This is how blood circulates in our veins and the sap circulates in a tree. This is the natural motion. When you destroy this natural motion, the water goes on its way sick or cancerous. When water comes up against a dam, the natural motion is destroyed and the water becomes sick. This sickness spreads up to the tributary rivers and to the fields through which these rivers have come and the
sickness will go to the fields bordering these rivers and will affect the grazing animals. They say that cancer is a disease of civilization. You will accept that, won’t you? It was unknown till we called ourselves civilized. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Little Brown Birds

will have nothing to do with this destruction of life. I will play no part in this devastation of this land. I am destined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and of the generations of tomorrow. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.


What, now, about these sparrows, which are which?

“I believe that this generation will either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilized world or it will be the first to have a vision, a daring and a greatness to say:

“I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life. I will play no part in this devastation of this land. I am destined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and of the generations of tomorrow. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

So when might you see a sparrow, or little brown bird? As the Nature Study Publishing Company aptly relates; “Of all animated nature, birds are the most beautiful in coloring, most graceful in form and action, swiftest in motion and most perfect emblems of freedom. They are withal, very intelligent and have many remarkable traits, so that their habits and characteristics make a delightful study for all lovers of nature. ”

Lincoln’s Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) is seen in a migratory pattern, watch for the Lincoln’s Sparrow in late April to the end of May, and again mainly in September. There are sightings in August and October as well, though one may be luckier in early May and September.

The Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana), another migratory sparrow, arrives in May and can be spotted throughout this month. Again, keep a look out in September and early October.

The American Tree Sparrow (Spizelloides arborea) is another little brown job more commonly seen in a migratory pattern, with the majority of sightings in March through May, and again in September and October, though the rare sighting occurs in February, throughout the summer, and between October to December.

Fox Sparrows ( Passerella iliaca ) are another migratory bird through this area. Watch for this little brown bird between April and beginning of May, and again in September and early October. There may be the occasional sighting in July or August.

Baird’s sparrow (Ammodramus bairdii) is seen through April and August, with the best of luck in August.

The Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum)i is similarly seen through April and mid-August.

LeConte’s Sparrow (Ammodramus leconteii) is most commonly sighted as well through April all they way to July, however a few folks record seeing them in August and September.

Nelson’s Sparrow (Ammodramus nelsoni) can be seen mid May to middle of August, with the rare sighting occuring in September.

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) is another summer arrival coming in May and seen throughout June as well. The sightings taper off between July to rarely seen in November, and never seen across the winter months.

The Vesper Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, Song Sparrow and Lincoln’s Sparrow arrive in the spring, stick around all summer, and leave in the fall. Look for the Vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) as early as late April, with the majority of the Vesper Sparrows arriving in May, sightings trail off in late August through October. The Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) will arrive in very late April, and again the main sightings are between May and August. Sightings of the Savannah Sparrow trail off in September and October, though rare sightings occur in December. The Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) arrives earlier, beginning of April, and ornitholgists can see the Song Sparrow through the fall, with sightings trailing off in October, and none after this till next spring.

Clay-coloured Sparrow (Spizella pallida) is very similar, arriving In May, and also seen heavily through June and early July, with sightings tapering off through the summer and early fall, with rare sightings occurring in November, and none in the winter months.

The Harris’ Sparrow (Zonotrichia querula) is easiest to sight end of April, beginning of May, and again there are regular sightings in starting end of August, and through September and October. A few avid bird watchers have found the Harris’ Sparrow end of February, and beginning of July.

One has to be a most excellent bird watcher to catch a glimpse of a Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla) , which may occur at the end of July, beginning of August.

Brewer’s Sparrow (Spizella breweri) also require a bird watcher of some skill, and sightings are best around the middle of May.

The White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)  is easiest to spot end of April and beginning of May, and again in September and October. There are regular sightings of the White-crowned sparrow between January to May, and the occasional sighting at the beginning of July.

The White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis), is mainly seen end of April through May, with the occasional sighting through the summer months. Again bird watchers find this little brown job in September and October, with a few stragglers sticking around November through February.

The Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla) is much harder to spot with minimal sightings, keep your eyes open in May.

From sights we pass to the consideration of sounds, and it is unfortunate that the two subjects have to be treated consecutively instead of together, since with birds they are more intimately joined than in any other order of beings; and in images of bird life at its best they sometimes cannot be dissociated;—the aërial form of the creature, its harmonious, delicate tints, and its grace of motion; and the voice, which, loud or low, is aërial too, in harmony with the form. So as you wander the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the Afforestation Area formerly known as George Genereux Park, please try to sight a sparrow, or perhaps, with a small bit of delight try to hear a sparrow. Compare the language, the shrill, the chirp, or the musical tune. Each has a melody unique to its own kind.

Do you not have the curiosity to know the songs of the marsh and woodlands? The story that is told from winter visitors, migrants, the summer breeders, and is there a season when the woodlands are silent? So pop out during the months outlined above, and see when the voices burst out altogether, hear the spring calls marking out the territory, the voices singing one to another. Which melodies are mysterious, and which are persistent? What is the charm which you find in nature? Find what happiness the ornithologist may derive from these shy creatures, very small and private, which fly from hikers when approached. Can you say that the pleasure of seeing and hearing them was purer, and much more lasting than pleasures of excitement. Can you picture the loveliness, the sunlit colours, and the grace of form motion, and melody which the brief glance into this world sends forth?

We know that as with sights so it is with sounds: those to which we listen attentively, appreciatively, or in any way emotionally, live in the mind, to be recalled and reheard at will.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

The clouds are my family.
When you cannot find me,
it is because my sisters
and brothers have called me.
We are singing circles of prayers
about the earth…
~James McGrath

Additional Links about Sparrows:
A sparrow (two photographs) and more on sharp photographs. Victor Rakmil.

Beautiful Sparrow. Michael Powell.

Bird count reports Saskatoon Nature Society.

Birding News. American Birding Association. Saskatchewan Bird news by Date. Easily find posts which mention American Birding Association rare birds.

Chipping Sparrow – Spizella passerina. Midwestern Plant Girl, Midwestern Plants.

Harris’s Sparrow Words from Aneli

Hummer and Sparrow. RV John

Marcotee, Amanda. 12-year-old birder spots rare bird in Saskatchewan. Eurasian Tree Sparrow rarely spotted in the province CBC News. May 19, 2015

Nature Saskatchewan: Bird Checklist Saskatchewan.
Regina Backyard Birds: Finches, Sparrows, Siskins. April 28, 2015. Prairie Nature Blogspot.

Saskatchewan. Bird Watching Resources for Bird Watching by Fatbirder. Fatbirder – linking birders worldwide… Wildlife Travellers see our sister site: WAND

Saskatchewan Birds. Nature and Scenery. Saskatchewan Birds and Nature. Nick Saunders.

Song Sparrow. Seattle Park Lover, Park Review.

Sparrow Fledglings. A Fairy mind, The storyteller’s abode

Sparrow Cheatsheet. Textile Ranger, Little Wild Streak.

Sparrow Highrise. Always Backroads Donna Catterick

Stand out sparrow. Tildy 1, the beespeak.

Sutter, Glen. Sparrows – Native Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Centre. University of Regina 2006.

Tree Sparrows. Submit your sightings.

White crowned Sparrow Notes in nature.

White throated Sparrow GXC Trails

Wordless Wednesday: American Tree Sparrow. Leslie, Under my Apple Tree.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song. ~Chinese Proverb

Margaret Rae McKay ~ seeing the details

“Forest entomology and forest pathology are usually classified under the general heading of “Forest protection”…gathering data and information on the occurrence of insects and diseases and that protection from insect outbreaks reduces fire hazard.” ~ J.J. de Gryse

If nothing ever changed, there’d be no butterflies. ~Author unknown.

It is just 6 year since Margaret Rae McKay passed away, and her life has been memorialized in an autobiographical account, “The Life of a Female Drifter.  An Entomologist Remembers.” Margaret Rae McKay (October 18, 1914 Vonda Saskatchewan – October 24, 2011 Ottawa, ON) was the very first women to graduate with her Master’s degree in entomology from the University of Saskatchewan (attending between 1931-1938). During this time, female scientists, were indeed, the exception to the rule, and it was very uncommon to see a female scientist, and almost unheard of for a female to become an entomologist. This trend continued on even into the 1970s, though has somewhat changed by the writing of the Entomological Society report of 2005.

McKay was hired initially after graduation as a talented artist at the British Museum of Natural History as a scientific illustrator, or morphological artist. For many true artists, the world is their pedestal, for McKay it was the world of insects, and embraced her attention to detail. In 1940, leaving her job in London, McKay traveled back to Canada, receiving employment with the Department of Agriculture working with the head of forest entomology in Ottawa. Over the summer, McKay’s work as illustrator allowed her to study  live insects. Encouraged during this time by her peers to write a paper or two for scientific journals to utilize her training in etymology from the University  of Saskatchewan, which she did successfully. From here, McKay worked a short time in the prairies before being called by the Civil service to the Vernon laboratory in British Columbia before returning to Ottawa, where she remained until 1946.

After her mother had a stroke in 1945 she came to Ottawa to live with Margaret. They both headed west the following year, spending the summer on the farm near Saskatoon before heading out to Vancouver, British Columbia. It was there, that McKay was welcomed back to the Vernon laboratory. About six forest rangers worked in the Vernon laboratory, who conducted forest surveys investigating any damage or insect infestation, recorded sites and collected live insects and the host plants they were found upon. The Victoria forest rangers making similar collections on Vancouver Island also submitted their findings to the Vernon laboratory. From the reports of the various sites, and information furnished to the laboratory, McKay described and documented the various life cycles to enable identification and life history of the insects. The Vernon laboratory sought to control any insect infestations by natural parasites, enemies and disease rather than the use of pesticides. During this era, there was a need of a reference collection. McKay established a well-organised and labelled system to rely upon, making a proficient sorting and classification system.

In 1944, McKay was invited to work with Dr. Carl Atwood (the father of Margaret Atwood), in Sault Ste. Marie. McKay spent a month there assisting on the insect survey. Here she saw North Bay during an infestation of May Flies, and a flight over Sault St. Marie revealed the spruce budworm damage.

From here, McKay returned to work in Ottawa, after receiving many offers at Lethbridge laboratory studying fruit insects, and other Forest Entomology laboratories across Canada ~ Winnipeg , Calgary or Sault Ste. Marie. McKay chose to work in Ottawa working under J.J. de Gryse, Chief Forest Insect Investigations, Department of Agriculture. “The problem of insect control in Canada is as really vast as the forest itself…The only rational approach to the solution of forest insect problems is through forest management…The great variety of physical conditions obtaining in a large country like Canada, the enormous number of insect species, and the complicated maze of relationships between insects and their habitat, and between insects and insects, constitute an inexhaustable source of problems requiring thorough investigation..see the forest as an organism and gauge the different factors involved which contribute to its health or decay.”de Gryse. 1943.

Canadian entomologists study insects within forest eco-systems alongside silviculturists. Both professions are working to maintain insect and disease populations within the forests at endemic levels and monitor conditions such that they do not reach levels that will create circumstances that will prevent long term forest sustainability.

McKay also wrote scientific papers who had them reviewed by Hazen Wagmore with degrees in both English and entomology. It was thus that McKay learned the language to become a successful writer in her field. Subsequently, McKay, herself became scientific editor analyzing the content of works submitted to The Canadian Entomologist.

During this era of her work in Ottawa, her attention and field of speciality turned to the immature forms of Lepidoptera. She remained in that field of study for 22 years, working with entomologist contemporaries such as G.J. Spencer, a professor in the UBC Zoology Department, who wrote one of the first definitive works in entomology and the identification of species in The Canadian Entomologist Volume 96, Numbers 1-2, January February 1964.

“Nor can one ignore morphological studies of those stages to distinguish species and determine relationships. There is a close relationship between the morphology (form) of a moth larva and the fine distinctions in its behaviour and environment. The position or shape of the head often appears to be associated directly, or indirectly with its behaviour” whether boring in the roots of the host plant, mining its leaves, living in a nest of webbing and frass (droppings) or in another habitat. The teeth of the mandible seem to be modified for feeding on conifers or deciduous hosts, or mining in leaves. The spinneret is modified for the type and amount of silk required for its owner’s mode of living. …This kind of information, basic research is required [without which a] project destined to fail from the beginning because two or more species were being treated as one, as a result of faulty identification….[McKay worked ] to distinguish each species, genus and the higher categories, so that I could classify each larval specimen and produce systematic keys that would, I hoped, enable others to do the same.”Margaret Rae McKay McKay was diligent in her work, and not at all nervous classifying insects. Both McKay, entomologist, and Richard St. Barbe Baker, silviculturist, were champions for the forest, protecting them. “Forest entomology and forest pathology are usually classified under the general heading of ‘Forest protection‘…gathering data and information on the occurrence of insects and diseases and that protection from insect outbreaks reduces fire hazard.” de Gryse. 1943.

As a member of the Lepidopterist Society in 1954, McKay’s interest was recorded as “LEPID larvae”, showing that she was interested in all lepidoptera larva, including Rhopalocera (butterflies), Macroheterocera and Microlepidoptera (moths). The Lepidoptera larva was the sphere to which she occupied herself with, and provided fascination. The translation, identification, and acquaintance with this sphere of nature and awakened in McKay some genius to convey this quality to other men. For botanists, for etymologists, nature will be reported. Scientists are engaged through time in writing the history of all things. On the planet, the moth goes attended by its cocoon, the butterfly the chrysalis. And it is thus, that the lepidoptera leave their memoranda and signature which speak out to the intelligent. In nature, this self-reporting is incessant, whether it is the channel in the soil left behind by the river, or the fern and leaf writing their epitaph in the coal. The records of the entomologists are alive, as that which they record are alive. It is thus, that the world has a new image, composed of pictures, eminent experiences, and journal writings. The facts of the forest insects, of the various butterfly and moths, do not lie inert, some will subside, but others will shine out. Whatever insect an entomologist beholds or experiences becomes a model for a picture. And nature further inspires, until at last, the entomologist can fully articulate the significance, the endowments, along with the frame of the ecosystem in the casting of the insect in its lot. With great attention to detail, classification and organisation the scholar in this field stands well among their contemporaries.

As a civil servant, McKay traveled North America, publishing numerous scientific papers. Between 1959-1961 McKay left the office and worked in the field collecting and observing insects at the Chisos Mountains in the Rio Grande Big Bend site of Texas, the One Sided Lake near Fort Francis and Kenora, Ontario, and another to Boulder Colorado across the mountains to Leadville, Buena Vista. McKay became a specialist in moths, and received acclaim for her research. As a pioneering female, McKay contributed to the Memoirs of the Entomological Society of Canada. Honoured by the Canadian Museum of National History along with eighteen other women scientists, and invited to a reception at the University of Western Ontario, London, On. Upon her retirement in 1972, McKay was asked by the British Museum of Natural History and from California, if she would consider going to work there.

McKay had suffered from a heart attack in 1966 and a third attack in 1977, which required open heart surgery. Following her retirement she took up world travel, and fine art painting. McKay passed away peacefully at home in Ottawa at the age of 97, and her ashes are buried alongside the family in Saskatoon.  The Margaret McKay Scholarship is awarded by for a female entomologist in a graduate program at the University of Saskatchewan.

March 8 is International Women’s Day. “We want to construct a different world of work for women. As they grow up, girls must be exposed to a broad range of careers, and encouraged to make choices that lead beyond the traditional service and care options to jobs in industry, art, public service, modern agriculture and science…” – UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka.* Being a woman in a male dominated field had its drawbacks for McKay.  A senior scientist asked to give an opinion on the stability of McKay, had evaluated her on the job performance as a “c” due to the fact that she was unmarried. When employed in field laboratories was passed over on aerial surveys to inspect insect damage because she was a girl. However, after years of service, upon retirement, McKay was one of the highest paid woman in the Civil Services department, with very few of the male staff earning the wage that McKay had earned. This was a fortunate anomaly for McKay, as even in today’s “more enlightened” times “Canadian women earn $0.82 to every $1.00 earned by men…[which] sets the gap in Canada at 18 per cent- much higher than in other countries, specifically in Europe.”Zamon On reflection, it seems as if the field of entomology holds promise for women scientists, on reviewing the life history of Margaret Rae McKay. Even today, there are “over 782 species of Lepidoptera in 6 families have aquatic stages. Unfortunately most have not been well studied. In Saskatchewan very little information is available on the aquatic species.”D Parker.

March is also National Women’s History Month

“The caterpillar does all the work, but the butterfly gets all the publicity.”
― George Carlin

“It is with a spirit of reverence that I approach God’s creation – this beautiful Earth. We may climb mountains or wander through field and forest, intoxicated by loveliness through the changing hours and seasons recorded by the length of shadows cast by the trees – and as we watch the pink, opalescent fingers of the dawn reaching up from beneath the dark horizon, so we wait for the sunrise of our awakening to the realisation of our kinship with the earth and all living things.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker, The Man of the Trees, Silviculturist, author and humanitarian

PUBLICATIONS by Margaret McKay [not complete list]:

Four monographs (book length) on the description of the larvae of families of moths, along with the detailed keys showing step by step routes to their identification, such as the larval study of Aegeriidae (clear-winged moths). Such monographs served to re-classify moth species by the larva to their respective genera. Up to this time botanist keys had been correlated for identification of adult lepidoptera, yet it was the larvae who affect the plants, flora and forest directly. To facilitate her research, McKay used an electron microscope to study the tiniest moth larvae species, who may bore in the needles of conifers, or mine leaves.

Additional larvae of the North American Olethreutinae (1) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

Larvae of the North American Tortricinae (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

Problems in Naming the Setae of Lepidopterous Larvae Canadian Entomologist 95(9):996-999 · September 1963

Larvae of the North American Torticinae (Lepidoptera: Torticidae)

“Almost everywhere in the world man has been disregarding the Divine Law and the Laws of Nature, to his own undoing. In his pride, he has rampaged over the stage of the earth, forgetting that he is only one of the players put there to play his part in harmony and oneness with all living things.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Bulletin. Entomological Society of Canada. Société d’entomologie du Canada … Volume 37 Number / numero 1. March / mars 2005.

De Gryse, J.J. Cooperation in Forest Insect Studies relating to Conservation Journal of Forestry, Volume 36, Number 10, 1 October 1938, pp. 983-986(4)

de Gryse, J.J. Report on the Sub-Committee on Forst Entomology of the Canadian Society of Forest Engineers. The Forestry Chronicle, 1936, 12(2): 237-239, 10.5558/tfc12237-2

de Gryse, J.J. Forest Entomology in post-war rehabiliation The Forestry Chronicle. , 1943, 19(1): 44-50, 10.5558/tfc19044-1

The G.J. Spencer Memorial Lecture Series at the University of British Columbia

Hanley, Debbie. Women entomologists 19 and early 20th centuries.

Lepidopterist’s Society [McKay, Margaret, (Miss). Div. of Entomology. Science Service Bldg. Ottawa. LEPID. larvae] List of Members. December 1954

Lepidoterists’ Society. 1952-6(6-8)125 List of Members. December 1952

Lepidopterists’ Society. List of Members. [McKay, Margaret, (Miss). Div. of Entomology. Science Service Bldg. Ottawa. LEPID. larvae] December. 1953.

Margaret Mckay Obituary. Legacy.com Ottawa Citizen.

Margaret Rae McKay. Necrologie.Genealogie Quebec.com 2017 The Citizen, Ottawa, ON

McKay, Margaret Rae. The Life of a Female Drifter. An Entomologist Remembers. General Store Publishing House. ISBN 1-894263-71-5. 2002. Burnstown, Ontario, Canada.

Parker, D. Saskatchewan Aquatic Neruoptera, Megaloptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera. Aquatex.

Pohl, Gregory R. Pohl, B. Christian Schmidt, J. Donald Lafontaine and Jean-François Landry,Gary G. Anweiler, Charles D. Bird.
Chapter 5 Moths and Butterflies of the Prairies Ecozone in Canada
[ includes Lepidoptera of conservation concern in the Prairies Ecozone ] Natural Resources Canada. Government of Canada.

Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Saskatchewan Volume 52. 2004. Editor Brian Galka.

Spencer Entolomological Collection. Beaty Biodiversity Museum.

Zamon, Rebecca. The Gender pay Gap in Canada is Twice the Global Average. The Huffington Post. May 6, 2015

“The spiraling flights of moths appear haphazard only because of the mechanisms of olfactory tracking are so different from our own. Using binocular vision, we judge the location of an object by comparing the images from two eyes and tracking directly toward the stimulus. But for species relying on the sense of smell, the organism compares points in space, moves in the direction of the greater concentration, then compares two more points successively, moving in zigzags toward the source. Using olfactory navigation the moth detects currents of scent in the air and, by small increments, discovers how to move upstream.”― Barbara Kingsolver

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“Millions of acres of rich farm lands are now deserts as the direct result of wholesale destruction of trees and forests…Of the earth’s 30 billion trees, already nine million acres [are replaced by] desert …We submit that if the earth loses a third of its tree cover it will assuredly die. The water table will sink beyond recall, and life on this planet will become impossible. It is a deplorable fact that during the past fifty years we have been skinning the earth alive.~Richard St. Barbe Baker.”

Call to Action!

pray to God that I remain to be just to the earth under my feet, to my neighbour, and my inner conscience”. Richard St. Barbe Baker

Call to Action!
United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020

“Ask any Canadian kid to name the world’s most endangered ecosystem, and chances are you’ll hear one of the following answers: 1) rainforests; 2) coral reefs; 3) leave me alone.by Dan Kraus” However, the answer, from The International Union for the Conservation of Nature, declared temperate grasslands as the world’s most endangered ecosystem. Bob Peart Saskatchewan in the middle of Canada’s plains, is the home of the temperate grasslands.

What is biodiversity anyways?  “Bio” is a prefix meaning life as in plants and animals or flora and fauna. Diversity means a variety. Biodiversity, therefore is a mix of flora and fauna which includes species diversity, ecosystem diversity, and genetic diversity, and their interrelationship with each other as they don’t live in a vacuum.

Right now is the Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020. What are you doing to preserve Saskatchewan’ temperate grasslands, the world’s most endangered ecoystem? How are you caring for Canada’s Biodiversity? What can you do?

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is unique with riparian afforested mixed woodlands, native aspen bluffs, the Chappell marsh wetlands eco-system, and tall grass prairie ~ an amazing semi-wilderness wildlife habitat rich in biodiversity within the City of Saskatoon. And check out the neighbouring afforestation area formerly named George Genereux Park, and its bio-diversity.

1./  “Biodiversity education begins with learning. Discover the names of the trees, birds, native plants and insects that share” the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area.1

2./ “Once you know a little more, get out and experience the wonders of life’s diversity. Visit a local park. Take an afternoon hike through the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. 2

3./ “Do Something: Finally, get involved! Make changes to your lifestyle which reduce your impact on the planet, or become a ‘citizen scientist’ and join others in contributing to our collective understanding of the world around us!” Included in the bibliography are a plethora of sites ~ a literal swarm of activities to get youth involved as a parent or a teacher, or perhaps you are  a kid or citizen scientist interested in saving the world around you.

Have you ever hugged a tree?
Hug a tree, and one day you will come to know
that it is not only that
you have hugged the tree
but that the tree also responds,
the tree also hugs you.
– Osho

BIBLIOGRAPHY: What can you do? Here are a few ideas….
Biodiversity. Environment. Government of Saskatchewan.

Biodiversity. 1996-2017 National Geographic Society.

Bug Blitz. A biodiversity workshop for kinds (Australia) Bugs aren’t for squishing, bugs are for appreciating. Love thy bug! Facebook page.

Biodiversity for kids NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Biodiversity in Saskatchewan. | What you can do Saskatchewan EcoNetwork.

Canada Youth Action Guide for Agenda 21 designed for young people, parents and educators. Carla Doucet, National Round Table on the Environment and Economy, and Student focus groups across Canada.

Children and Youth. Global Youth Biodiversity Network, Youth, Biodiversity and Sustainable Development Goals, Join the Green Wave One School, One Tree, One Gift to Nature! CBD Secretariat Convention on Biological Diversity.

Earth Rangers Saskatchewan initiatives. “Earth Rangers is a registered Canadian charity whose mission is to educate kids about the importance of biodiversity and empower them to protect animals and their habitat. ”

EcoLeague } Sustainability Classroom Resources at Resources for ReThinking Our Canada Project. 2017 Learning for a Sustainable Future. LSF

Ecology for Kids. Summer kids Camps. ” Kids will visit scientists, study rocks, fossils, plants, insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals and Saskatchewan Endangered Species, and then undertake environmentally friendly projects to help them! ” University of Saskatchewan.

Homes on the Range: Conservation in Working Prairie Landscapes. Prairie Conservation and
Endangered Species Conference and Workshop 2007.

Kids Activities. “Water Watchdog Activities! Water Watchdog Origami Activity. Water Watchdog Word Find. Water Footprint, Water Detective. Play Catchment Detox! ScienceSeekers: Wetlands. Wetlands Activity! Biodiversity: A Data Discovery Game.” Partners FOR the Saskatchewan River Basin.

Kids Right To Know. One planet for all All for one planet. Environment Canada.

Gone Wild for Wildlife: Learning more about preserving Saskatchewan biodiversity | Gone Wild for Wildlife The Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Saskatchewan and the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Global News.

Just for kids Saskatchewan Burrowing Owl Interpretive Centre.

KAWS Animal Rescue. Because Kritters are Worth Saving!

Lesson Plans and Teacher Resources through the Green Classroom. Ausable Bayfield Conservation.

Macdonald, Cam. Where do you want to go birding in Saskatchewan today?
Mitchell, Kathi. Biodiversity for Kids Mrs. Mitchell’s Virtual School

Morrisey, Beth MLIS Biodiversity and Nature. Quizzes, puzzles, and activities. Ecofriendly Kids

Nature at work. Why Biodiversity is important to you. Environment Canada. Government of Canada.

Northeast Swale Northeast Swale Watchers

Peart, Bob. Life in a Working Landscape: Towards a Conservation Strategy for the World’s Temperate Grasslands. 2008 the International Union for the Conservation of Nature declared temperate grasslands as the world’s most endangered ecosystem. A Record of The World Temperate Grasslands Conservation Initiative Workshop Hohhot, China – June 28 & 29, 2008 August 2008.

On the Prairie – Games 2017 by the Native Plant Society of Saskatchewan.

Preserving Rare ecosystems and biodiversity in Canada. | Saskatchewan’s Underappreciated Trails Nature Canada.

Protecting Biodiversity. Endangered Species Legislation. Wildlife and Habitat. Issues. David Suzuki Organization.

Resources for Educators “Wetland Centres of Excellence. Project Webfoot. Earn Wetland Hero Status. Duck Detectives.” Ducks Unlimited.

Resources. School Ground Greening resources, Teacher’s Corner, Community greening resources, food growing resources, native plant database. Evergreen Canada.

Robin, Michael. Responsible pet ownership crucial to saving salamander and newt biodiversity “The fate of the world’s richest biodiversity of salamanders and newts is in the hands of pet owners across North America, said Natacha Hogan, an environmental toxicologist specializing in amphibians at the University of Saskatchewan. ” May 30, 2016. University of Saskatchewan.

Sage Grouse Initiative SGI Wildlife Conservation Through Sustainable Ranching. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) initiative.

Saskatoon Nature Society Kids in Nature Grant Program

Saskatoon Zoo Society. | Young Naturalists. Events for kids.

Saskatchewan’s Ecoregions Saskatchewan Conservation Data Centre

What is Biodiversity? Helping Biodiversity in your Own Backyard ~ create a Certified Wildlife Habitat! National Wildlife Federation.
What is biodiversity? Education and Awareness | What can you do? Biodiv Canada. The Canadian
Biodiversity Strategy. Government of Canada.

Dan Kraus, Dan. Why Canada’s Prairies are the world’s most endangered ecosystem. Land Lines The Nature Conservancy of Canada. October 24, 2016

Why is biodiversity so important Ted Ed 2011-2017 The Kid Should See This

Wild About Saskatoon Spring festival

Q: How is a dog and an ornithologist alike?
A: One wags a tail and the other tags a Gadwall (Waterfowl or Duck).

I pray to God that I remain to be just to the earth under my feet, to my neighbour, and my inner conscience”. Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker
Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Q: How did the herpetologist know he would be married soon? A: He caught the garter snake.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***