Robert Lamb, Conservationist

World Television Day
21 November 2018

As John May says, Robert Lamb [February 7, 1949 – September 12, 2005] was a “conservationist with a warning for the world about deforestation.[8*]” Lamb as editor of Earth Report also contributed to the periodical “Tree News” and “The Generalist”. Robert Lamb worked indefatigably as a tree campaigner, and conservationist and was employed as a government scientific officer in the fields of tropical agronomy, entomology, and integrated management in Gambia, Ghana, Niger, Yemen, and Nigeria.

Robert Lamb wrote a biographical tribute on the 80th birthday of Richard St. Barbe Baker. Whereas, St. Barbe Baker is known for the books he published, as well as his role in establishing the International Tree Foundation [formerly Man of the Trees]. However, Robert Lamb remembered that St. Barbe also helped to initiate the Soil Association and the Forestry Association of Great Britain. Robert Lamb chose his vocation as a forester from hearing the passionate speeches of St. Barbe Baker. The ripple effect that St. Barbe Baker had on the planet resulted in a global awareness of the importance of trees and forests to the survival of our planet.

“His life [Richard St. Barbe Baker’s] proved that it is not enough just to know trees or understand the science of coexisting with them. If we wish to deserve to protect them, we must also love them.” Robert Lamb.

Robert Lamb went on to write the book, “World without trees” Dutch Elm disease and other human errors. Introduction by Anthony Huxley. Publisher: Wildwood House Ltd; First Edition edition (May 17, 1979) ISBN-10: 0704502577 ISBN-13: 978-0704502574, ” Drawing the Line: Earth Report 10″, “Careers in environmental conservation” revised by Robert Lamb. (ISBN)0749415673 (OCoLC)34851079 and Promising the Earth” Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (October 11, 1996) ISBN-10: 0415144434 ISBN-13: 978-0415144438. LAmb followed these publications with a documentary, “Mpino, the Tree that Makes Music” (1992) Other notable documentaries followed; “Fate of the Forest” [1996], “Paper Tiger” and “Blood Timber”. Robert Lamb compiled an extensive filmography of over 220 documentaries. Lamb worked with the World Forest Action [WFA], and Friends of the Earth [FoE]

Forest Film Documentaries
Forest Film Documentaries

In the book “World without trees” Dutch Elm disease and other human errors, Lamb calls attention to the international crisis of worldwide deforestation, and Dutch Elm Disease. The Elm, “as well as being a dominant tree in many rural areas, the elm was also an important urban tree, and once constituted a significant proportion of the tree population in many towns and cities…The Dutch elm disease crisis had a profound impact on how the British public viewed not only their trees, but the wider natural environment. The idea that such a well-loved tree could just disappear from our rural and urban landscapes was difficult for many people to grasp.”

What brought about the mishap of the arboreal disaster, the fungal disease known as Dutch Elm disease? “the major causes being the virulence of the mutant strain of the causal fungus from Canada, its wide specificity [an entire genus], its largely clonal mode of regeneration, and lastly the failure of much-acclaimed phytosanitary measures at the ports. Re-installation of this beautiful and useful genus,  pheromones having disappointed, may, one can hope, depend on a viral success comparable to that of Baculovirus oryctes on the coconut beetle[1]” So was the Dutch Elm disease epidemic caused by the “careless trafficking of timber traders?[1]”

Forest Film Documentaries
Forest Film Documentaries

“Promising the Earth” relates the epic struggles of the Friends of the Earth environmental group, and the unfolding story of green campaigns. Working for the Friends of the Earth has been described as “It’s not another job in another organisation; it’s a cause, and it takes people over, body, mind and soul.[3]**”

“These are times that try men’s souls. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly. Let it be told to the future that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive, the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet and repulse it.” ~Tom Paine

“Mpino, the Tree that Makes Music” (1992) alerted the world to the devastating effects of woodwind instruments, the clarinet and flute, created from the African Blackwood Tree (African Ebony) family Leguminosae, genus Dalbergiav, species melanoxylon. As a result of this documentary, musical concerts raised funds to reforest the African Blackwood Tree. The call to plant special trees and to protect the African Blackwood Tree, was taken up by Debbie Larson, the African Blackwood Conservation Project ABCP and Fauna and Flora International/SoundWood.

Forest Film Documentaries
Forest Film Documentaries


Robert Lamb was a voice for the environment, and spoke up on behalf of forests globally. With creative vision, publishing numerous books, and documentaries, Robert Lamb made a difference networking the devastating effects of deforestation and increasing environmental consciousness internationally.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Edwardson, T.E. World without trees [review] New Scientist 12 July 1979.

2. Jonhston, Mark. Trees in Towns and Cities: A History of British Urban Arboriculture Publisher Windgather Press, 2015 ISBN 1909686638, 9781909686632.

3. **Lamb, Robert. Promising the Earth Routledge, 2012ISBN 1135104638, 9781135104634

4. Robert Lamb. Writer and conservationist. The Times [London]. November 1, 2005

5.Lamb, Robert. The Man of the Trees. The Generalist. October 14, 2005.

6. Robert Lamb Environmentalist who devoted himself to highlighting the destruction of forest habitats for commercial purposes. The Times U.K. November 12, 2005

7. May, John. Robert Lamb: Tree Campaigner, Creative Conservationist The Generalist. October 14, 2005.

8*. May, John. Robert Lamb The Guardian. Oct. 14, 2005. [
John May, a freelance journalist, and editor of “The Generalist” brings forward news and developments as they affect the environment, science, culture and politics.

9.  Robert Lamb. Source Watch.

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

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Praise from Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario

Paul Hanley’s Biography of Richard St. Barbe Baker celebrated by Her Honour Lieutenant Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell.

Praise for Man of the Trees Man of the Trees: Richard St. Barbe Baker, the First Global Conservationist, with a foreword by HRH Prince Charles and introduction by Jane Goodall

“Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario & Former UN Under Secretary General, UNEP – This biography of pioneering conservationist and environmental campaigner Richard St. Barbe Baker is in part a tribute to a remarkable man, and in part a guidebook for re-energizing our collective efforts to walk more lightly on Earth. In taking the reader through his life and career, Paul Hanley leaves no stone unturned: thoroughly researched chapters detail the depth and breadth of St. Barbe Baker’s activities to stave off deforestation and ecological degradation. I have no doubt this volume will inspire people everywhere to follow his example.” Her Honour Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario

Her Honour Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario
Her Honour Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario

.

Man of the Trees: Richard St. Barbe Baker reminds us that a sustainable future, one of inclusive prosperity, environmental stewardship, & cultural cohesion, is not beyond our reach Her Honour Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario

“As long as recorded history, generations have successfully competed with their predecessors in their efforts to devise quicker, vaster, and more permanent methods of destruction and exploitation.  Science divorced ethics is like a mind which in its blind self-sufficiency has torn itself away from the heart and man’s downhill race to total destruction can only be halted by immediate, courageous and resolute action.

And who will take this action?  The world is sick indeed and needs a Divine Physician. If either of the great powers presses the wrong button to-morrow it will be too late.  This generation may either be the last to survive in any semblance of a civilized world, or it will be the first to have the vision, the daring, and the greatness to say, “I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life; I will play no part in this devastation of the land, skinning it alive by removing virgin tree cover; I am destined to live and work for peaceful construction, for I am morally responsible for the world of to-day and to the generations of to-morow.”

“TWAHAMWE” is our motto.  ‘Let us pull together’, and let us give our active support to all efforts of desert reclamation by tree-planting.”  from the Richard St. Barbe Baker’s Condensed Sketch of Richard St. Barbe Baker’s Life in the University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

 

 

Book Launch: Man of the Trees. Richard St. Barbe Baker, the First Global Conservationist. By Paul Hanley Foreword by HRH The Prince of Wales Introduction by Jane Goodall

Paul Hanley, short biography

Paul Hanley, Saskatoon, SK

Man of the Trees University of Regina Press

Serendipity; the Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan and Paul Hanley

Tribute from His honour, W. Thomas (Tom) Molloy, O.C., S.O.M., Q.C., LL.B, LL.D. Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan

Praise from Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario

Paul Hanley Eleven on You Tube

Paul Hanley Meewasin Conservation Award 2014

Paul Hanley, Eleven Billion People Will Change Everything.

Paul Hanley, Saskatoon StarPhoenix, Page 1

Paul Hanley, Saskatoon StarPhoenix, Page 2

Visit Paul Hanley’s website:
http://www.elevenbillionpeople.com/

To learn more about U of R Press, visit:
https://www.uofrpress.ca/

To check out Sask Books’ Book store, visit:
http://www.skbooks.com

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Afforestation; City Honoured as Pioneer

It is wonderful to be part of the City of Saskatoon, a city that at once is a pioneer in the world afforestation efforts. Saskatoon, was way ahead of the times in 1972.  The parks department showed incredible foresight by implementing this “Green Survival” programme as it was called in its inception.

 

“We’ve got to realize we live in a biosphere.  When the trees go, the people go.  It’s a question of survival now.  We’ve got to plant trees within the  next 10 years to save our lives.  We’ve been eating into our forest cover faster in the last 50 years than ever.  If we want to enter the new century with forests, we will have to start planting trees for our lives now.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker reported by Zeina Cleigh.  Tribune Staff Writer.

‘Afforestation’ is the establishment of a forest or stand of trees (forestation) in an area where there was no previous tree cover.

‘Deforestation’ which means cutting of forests or trees.

‘Reforestation’ is the natural or intentional restocking of existing forests and woodlands (forestation) that have been depleted, usually through deforestation.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area was planted by the City of Saskatoon parks department in 1972.  The three afforestation areas, 660 acres, were preserved in perpetuity that same year by City Council.

Wayne Buckle, a tree planter in that year, says ” I have always enjoyed travelling over the train overpass on Highway 7 to watch my forest grow – that’s probably the best vantage point to view it” ~ Leslee Newman

Paul Hanley also wrote the best selling book Eleven speaking the time when the planet reaches Eleven billion people ~ echoing the following sentiments of Richard St. Barbe Baker.  What are the choices facing this  generation for the future survival of our planet?

A few of the many and several articles written about afforestation and the benefits to the planet are; Afforestation and Reforestation for Climate Change   and Climate change mitigation through afforestation / reforestation These, of course, are just two of over 1,510,000 scientific articles on the importance and value of afforestation to mitigate climate change.

Will the human race fail, fizzle, give out, go out, peter out, run out, break, break down, collapse, conk (out), crash, cut out, die, expire, stall, stop, run down, wane?

It is up to you, personally, to help your grandchildren and all of  humanity to hold out, hold up, keep up, last, prevail, bear up, carry on, cope, endure, fare, get along, get by, get on, go, hang in, make out, manage, persevere, abide, continue, draw out, hang on, hold on, linger, persist, remain, run on.

What can you do?

  1. Plant a tree, nay plant ten trees a year as requested by St. Barbe.
  2. Support afforestation efforts around the world.
  3. Care for trees everywhere.
  4. Do a good deed.
  5. Read Eleven, and the need to become a Sylvan economy as requested by St. Barbe

It is wonderful to be part of the City of Saskatoon, a city that at once is a pioneer in the world afforestation efforts. Saskatoon, was way ahead of the times in 1972.  The parks department showed incredible foresight by implementing this “Green Survival” programme as it was called in its inception.

Paul Hanley, a personal friend of St. Barbe, a freelance writer, and environmentalist,  has written a biography on this internationally known forester, Richard St. Barbe Baker.  Contact Paul Hanley for more information about this book in order to learn more about the afforestation area namesake, Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Paul Hanley | Eleven

A transformational model that will help individuals, institutions, and communities make an eleven-billion world work for everyone—and the planet.

Ideas Transform the World.

Planet Earth, the World, is in our Hands
Planet Earth, the World, is in our Hands

Ideas Matter.

Eleven Billion facebook and the book “Eleven” are written by Paul Hanley, winner of the Canadian Environment award and the University of Saskatchewan President’s Award for Non-Fiction 2015, via Saskatchewan Book Awards, for Eleven. Hanley has definitely compiled a timely book which faces the paradigm facing all of us individually as the global population reaches 11 billion by the end of this century.

Hanley reclaims the future, sows seeds for a new culture, and provides a model for positive change. What do greenhouse gases, climate change, health, 21st century culture, agriculture, environment conservation and protection have in common? “We are going to change so completely that future civilization will be barely recognizable. We are going to change because, faced with extinction, ‘our better angels’ will prevail.”P3. Eleven

One of the many, diverse stories in Eleven is about Sawadogo, The Man Who Stopped the Desert. This farmer, without any training at all, began pioneering farming techniques for agriculture, increasing farm productivity. Amazingly Sawadogo also created 20 hectares of forest…in a desert. These innovative techniques of “restoring vegetation has been shown to create climatic feedback loops that increase rainfall.” p.162 Eleven. Think of that ~ a desert with rain!!!

These concepts were also seen by Richard St. Barbe Baker. After completing his silviculture course in forestry at Cambridge University, St. Barbe was posted to Kenya, Africa. While there, he witnessed the devastation which agricultural methods were creating on the land. It was here that the first forest scouts “Watu Wa Miti” {Men of the Trees} were assembled and encouraged to make a solemn promise to do one good deed each day, plant ten trees, seedlings or seeds each year, and take care of Trees everywhere.”*

Just as Sawadogo recognized the effects of erosion, St. Barbe, also only turned around farming practices in Kenya with the Watu Wa Miti initiating the International Trees Foundation (formerly Men of the Trees)  St Barbe says; “The great Empires of Assyria, Babylon, Carthage and Persia were destroyed by floods and deserts let loose in the wake of forest destruction. Erosion following forest destruction and soil depletion has been one of the most powerfully destructive forces in bringing about the downfall of civilizations and wiping out human existence from large tracts of the earth’s surface. Erosion does not march with a blast of trumpets or the beating of drums, but its tactics are more subtle, more sinister.”

St Barbe Baker wrote in Green Glory: The Forests of the World that “We advocate that all standing armies everywhere be used for the work of essential reafforestation . .. in the countries to which they belong, and that each country . . . shall provide expeditionary forces to cooperate in the greater tasks of land reclamation in the Sahara and other deserts.”

Hanley explains that “deforestation and forest degradation, through agricultural expansion, conversion to pastureland, infrastructure development, destructive logging, and fires accounts for nearly 20 percent of global [Greenhouse Gas] GHG emissions, second only to the energy sector, and more than the entire global transportation sector.” p. 168 Eleven.

However, just as St. Barbe and Sawadogo saw and recognized poor agricultural practices and put into practice innovative techniques to reclaim the environment, and bringing hope to people and communities, so too, does Hanley offer a way for us to wake up with innovative ideas.  Paul Hanley knew Richard St. Barbe Baker personally.  Hanley suggests, that, “This awakening world would necessarily lead to an ethical revolution that will help emerging generations build a new social-ecological order on a sustainable foundation.” P. 337 Eleven. How can we wake up, how can we change the world? Hanley offers hope, but not only hope, Hanley offers a well-researched model for progress, a methodology for all of us to get started to change the world outlined in his book Eleven.

Yann Martel, author of Life of Pi says “Every concerned citizen of this planet needs to read this book.” However, it may be best to go one step further, and say everybody, every citizen will gain insight and incredible opportunities to transform the world by reading Eleven. Hanley, environmental columnist for the Saskatoon Star Phoenix since 1989 has delved into global and environmental concerns, and in Eleven, Hanley provides more than hope. Eleven is an innovative solution and recipe for an enlightened social-ecological system for personal, local and global worldviews to survive. Not only to survive, but to live sustainably and well.

“You may ask, ‘…Why do I have to be at all concerned with those circumstances that have existed before I was born, and will most certainly continue to exist after I have taken myself out of this rather soiled and seedy world and have moved to other areas of consciousness?’
The only answer that can be given to such a question is that the world is a mirror and the more one polishes and cleans the mirror, the better one can see one’s reflection. …Does it not stand to reason that the elements that are used in this magnificent venture need to be kept in tip-top condition?” ~Emmanuel

“Trees worked for millions of years to make it possible for man to come on this planet. Yet man, who owns his presence on this Earth to trees, has been cutting, burning, greedily and recklessly. He has turned the forest into desert, until today we are faced not only with a timber famine, but with a food famine.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Business, Technology, 21st Century Culture, Planet Earth
Business, Technology, 21st Century Culture, Planet Earth

Let us turn back the clock…to the great wars, World War I and World War II. Outside of combat, war efforts had other ecological impacts. “Twentieth Century technology made forest destruction much easier than in Caesar’s (or William Tecumseh Sherman’s day)… European wheat demand in World War I led to the plowing up of about 6 million hectares of grasslands on the American High plains and in Canada’s prairie provinces. This helped prepare the way for the dust bowl of the 1930s. The British war effort in World War II consumed about half of Britain’s forests. McNeill.” How have we corrected and ameliorated these environmental changes and damages? What can we possibly do now? Hanley has an answer for ecological, environmental and agriculture futures in Eleven.

“The greatest achievement was at first and for a time a dream. The oak sleeps in the acorn, the bird waits in the egg, and in the highest vision of the soul a waking angel stirs. Dreams are the seedlings of realities.”~ James Allen

Is it true what Vaclav Havel says that “Modern man must descend the spiral of his own absurdity to the lowest point; only then can he look beyond it. It is obviously impossible to get around it, jump over it, or simply avoid it.” Or is it more probable as Rene Daumal says, “You cannot stay on the summit forever; you have to come down again. So why bother in the first place ? Just this: What is above knows what is below, but what is below does not know what is above. One climbs, one sees. One descends, one sees no longer, but one has seen. There is an art of conducting oneself in the lower regions by the memory of what one saw higher up. When one can no longer see, one can at least still know.” A glimpse into Eleven will surely allow everyone to know. To know a healthier world, a “united, just and sustainable civilization that encompasses everyone, including our extended human body ecosphere. P.372 Eleven.

Planet Earth Future Generations
Planet Earth Future Generations

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Eleven Friesen Press.

“ELEVEN is a call to consciousness. Only an ‘ethical revolution’ will allow us to carry forward an ever-advancing civilization. Paul Hanley proposes a transformational model that will help individuals, institutions, and communities make an eleven-billion world work for everyone—and the planet.” *

Emmanuel’s Book. A Manual for living comfortably in the cosmos. Compiled by Pat Rodegast and Judith Stanton. ISBN 0-553-34387-4. Bantam Books. New York. 1987.

Hanley, Paul. Eleven “eleven billion people will share this planet by century’s end. Adding 4 billion to an already overburdened world will force everyone to change everything.” Friesen Press. Victoria BC. ISBN 978-1-4602-5045-7 (Hardcover) ISBN 978-1-4602-5046-4 (Paperback) ISBN 978-1-462-5047-1 (ebook). 2014.

MacNeil,J.R. Ideas Matter: A Political History of the Twentieth Century Environment. “The grand social, and ideological systems that people construct for themselves invariably carry large consequences, for the environment no less than for more strictly human affairs. Among the swirl of ideas, policies and political structures of the twentieth century, the most ecologically influential were the growth imperative and the (not related) security anxiety that dominated policy around the world…By 1970, however something new was afoot.” From Current History November 2000, PP 371-382. originally excerpted from “An Environmental HIstory of the Twentieth Century World” New York. Norton 2000) by Current History Inc. reprinted with permission: Environment 2002/2003. Annual Editions. 21st Edition. Editor John L. Allen. McGraw-Hill Dushkin. ISBN 0-07-250682-2.

Van, Leon C. Le. Poems from Swedenborg Swedenborg Foundation Inc. New York. ISBN 0-87785-134-4. 1987.

Wildlife Montage. Red Winged Blackbird, White Tailed Deer Fawn, Garter Snake, JackRabbit, Mallard Ducklings, Black Crowned Night Heron
Wildlife Montage. Red Winged Blackbird, White Tailed Deer Fawn, Garter Snake, JackRabbit, Mallard Ducklings, Black Crowned Night Heron

For more information:
You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Spring Sunset Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Spring Trees Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

The angels,
Who are principled
In the science
Of all knowledges,
And that in such a manner
That scarce a thousandth part
Can be unfolded
To man’s apprehension,
Yet esteem knowledges
As nothing
In comparison to use.~Swedenborg

What is an afforestation area?

From water and earth we came, and the future of mankind on this planet will be determined by respectful or disrespectful treatment of these basic elements. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

The present is full of opportunity. Never before in the history of the planet has mankind been given the privileges and opportunities that are at his disposal today. A great light has been raised and is penetrating the darkness of the world, but alas, too many with dust blinded eyes have yet to catch the vision. Some of us have. That is our privilege and our responsibility. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

What is an afforestation area?  Afforestation is the planting of trees upon land which have not contained trees previously.

Reforestation, on the other hand, is the reforestation of an existing forest which has been depleted usually because of deforestation.

Deforestation is the removal of a forest to make use of the land as farms, ranches, or neighbourhoods.

So in the case of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the Afforestation Area Formerly known as George Genereux Park, the lands were part of  the aspen parkland biome. Aspen parkland refers to a very large area of transitional biome between prairie and boreal forest.  Aspen parkland consists of groves of aspen poplars and spruce interspersed with areas of prairie grasslands, also intersected by large stream and river valleys lined with aspen-spruce forests and dense shrubbery. This is the largest boreal-grassland transition zone in the world and is a zone of constant competition and tension as prairie and woodlands struggle to overtake each other within the parkland.

Because of afforestation, the area possesses a miraculous, and fully established mixed wood forest featuring both deciduous and evergreen trees.  It is common in the Saskatchewan eco-system to not behold a mixed forest of this stature unless one is north of the tree line or at Cypress Hills park, as both these areas are at a higher elevation.  To have a mature mixed forest with gorgeous canopy, full understorey, rich and vibrant semi-wilderness wildlife habitat corridor along with wetlands inclusive of Chappell Marsh with emergent fauna  is a true blessing and good fortune within the boundary limits of the City of Saskatoon.  This is a tribute to the City of Saskatoon parks department and the great insight of a great man, named Bert Wellman Saskatoon Director of Planning and Development who had a vision for a green belt to embrace and grace Saskatoon.

From water and earth we came, and the future of mankind on this planet will be determined by respectful or disrespectful treatment of these basic elements. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Facebook: Off leash dog park Valley Road Saskatoon!

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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