Why We Love Forests (and You Should Too!)

What are a few of the benefits of afforestation areas?

Trees provide semi-wilderness wildlife habitats.   The very nature of the afforestation area helps wildlife and ecosystems to thrive and flourish. The mix of native and exotic trees provide animal homes and sanctuaries as well as food sources.

The afforestation areas play a huge role in mitigating the greenhouse effect.  Forests are carbon sinks, as they absorb Carbon Dioxide from the air, and replenish life giving oxygen.

Afforestation areas create a healthy environment in an urban environment.  City people can reconnect with nature and the outdoors, themselves becoming healthier and happier.  The entire city society benefits from this nature interconnectivity. Richard St. Barbe Baker spoke of spiritual renewal.  Urban city folks such as the Fatlanders Fat Tire Brigade can bicycle or off leash dog walkers can meander on trails enjoying recreational, tourism and educational activities.  Saskatoon Nature Society members ring birds and monitor bird counts, citizen scientists contribute to e-bird  and  i-naturalist Photographers capture the natural beauty and esthetics of the area.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Afforestation areas do protect land from soil erosion and flooding.  The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park are two of three afforestation areas in Saskatoon.  These two are located on the south west peri-urban area of the city and are in the West Swale locale.  The West Swale is subject to flooding and holding permanent and temporary wetlands as the Swale is a “low lying” area created from a major Pleistocene floodway channel. The West Swale is a striking geomorphological feature as it provides the historical evolution of the enormous events which happened during the culminating era of proglacial lakes and spillways which formed in central Saskatchewan.  A truly remarkable period in geological history.

Forests provide crucial services for human well-being and economic development. They provide food, freshwater and fuel, support soil formation, regulate floods, climate and diseases, and can fill educational, medicinal, aesthetic and spiritual needs. They stabilize ecosystems, play an integral part in the carbon cycle, support livelihoods, and supply other goods and services that drive sustainable growth. Yet, forests are under stress from overexploitation, pollution, population pressure and the expansion and intensification of agricultural practices. With the additional impacts of climate change, forests are further threatened, and these adverse events may further impact land quality – leading to biodiversity loss, food insecurity, increased pests, reduced availability of clean water and increased vulnerability to environmental changes.” Luc Bas, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) European Regional Office Director.

 

For more information:

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park with map

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area with map

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area 😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

“Our woods and forests, the indispensable lure of our earth organism, are falling into a murderous dance of death
“Planting and growing increasing quantities of trees is the scientific solution to Earth’s environmental dilemma.” –Richard St. Barbe-Baker

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The Ultimate Treehouse

Greenscape or Greyscape?

Vertical Forest

“Would you rather see trees or more glass and steel? A building that tries to mitigate its impact on the urban climate, or one that contributes to the heat-island effect? A tower that’s a beacon for migrating birds and butterflies, or that further disrupts their flight? That absorbs carbon dioxide, or doesn’t?”(Source)

Bosco Verticale towers in Milan, Italy
Bosco Verticale (Vertical Forest) Source: Nguyen Tan Tin

 

Don’t these Residential towers take the concept of a green wall or ecowall to the skies?

So recently discussing the nestling of naturalized settings in an urban setting such as the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park of the city of Saskatoon a question came up regarding the long range planning of areas in the city. The question was; what exactly is a vertical forest?  This is a follow up to What is a Vertical Forest? – this article provides various sources of vertical forests!!!

What about a vertical forest, 27 storeys high! Vertical forests are amazing systems “combatting the heat island effect of the city and creating a way-finding post for birds, insects and pollinators struggling to locate the urban green spaces that are increasingly hemmed in by human-made structures.”(Source)

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker My Life My Trees

“As cities continue to grapple with air pollution, housing shortages, and climate change, these vertical forests could very well be the residential typology we need for the future. And you can certainly expect to see more of them.”(Source)

“The vertical vegetation produces oxygen, provides habitats for bird and insect life and reduces air pollution: Studies have shown that one tree reduces dust in its vicinity by 7–24%.”(Source)

University of Ottawa Social Sciences Building courtesy Jon Kolbert
University of Ottawa Social Sciences Building courtesy Jon Kolbert

“Pathways and ponds will blend seamlessly into the surrounding business district as a way to complement the existing green spaces …Curving balconies will resemble traditional Asian rice terraces, which are often referred to as the “eighth wonder of the world.”(Source)

“The vegetal system of the Vertical Forest aids in the construction of a microclimate, produces humidity, absorbs CO2 and dust particles and produces oxygen.”(Source)

“The 23 different tree varieties will produce around 132 pounds (60kg) of oxygen every day”(Source)

“Planting and growing increasing quantities of trees is the scientific solution to Earth’s environmental dilemma.”  Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Like most ideas in design it is more metaphorical. Trees on a building while borrowing from the idea of a forest are a long way from having the true ecological structure of a forest. But the objective is to increase biomass, biodiversity and canopy cover.”(Source)

Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana Mexico Courtesy ThelmadatterUniversidad.del.Claustro.de.Sor.Juana.Mexico.Thelmadatter
Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana Mexico Courtesy Thelmadatter

“Vertical Forest is a model for a sustainable residential building, a project for metropolitan reforestation that contributes to the regeneration of the environment and urban biodiversity without the implication of expanding the city upon the territory. It is a model of vertical densification of nature within the city that operates in relation to policies for reforestation and naturalization of large urban and metropolitan borders. (Source)

In a vertical forest ” plants will consume 50 tons of carbon dioxide per year. That’s the equivalent of kicking about 10 cars off the road annually.”(Source)

“Viewers around the world were left breath-taken …The vertical gardens are designed with large canopies that provide share in the day and come alive with displays of light and sound at night, and they provide a home to an array of different animals.”(Source)

musée du quai Branly Paris Courtesy Jean-Pierre Dalbéra
musée du quai Branly  Paris Courtesy Jean-Pierre Dalbéra

“But what if we could live in a vertical forest, lush and boiling over with foliage? As humans, we benefit from vegetative, green environments both physically and psychologically. A plethora of studies have explored the benefits of having indoor plants found that people who spend time caring for nature are more likely to care for others. There’s even a restorative treatment called Forest Therapy that involves spending time in wooded areas for the purpose of enhancing health, wellness, and happiness.”(Source)

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it is the “Skin” of the earth, for without it there can be no water and, therefore, no life. Richard St. Barbe Baker

What can cities and developers learn from naturalized areas?  How can urban spaces develop around natural green spaces?  Can cities increase the greenscape over the grey landscape?  What do you think of Vertical Forests?

Bibliography

A Hedera green façade – Energy performance and saving under different maritime-temperate, winter weather conditions
A Guide to Green Roofs, Walls and Façades
Build Sask Green
Evaluating the Effects of Façade Greening on Human Bioclimate in a Complex Urban Environment
Experimental study of the urban microclimate mitigation potential of green roofs and green walls in street canyons.
Green roofs Land Stewardship Centre
Green Roofs: Good for the Economy and the Environment Ecofriendly Sask
Growing Green Guide
Life Cycle Costs of Green Roofs
Living Walls
The Animal Biodiversity of Green Walls in the Urban Environment
Whole life costing: Green roofs

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area 😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Spiral shelterbelts

October 1 2018, the first monday in October is World Habitat Day.

How can Richard St. Barbe Baker’s theory of spiral shelters be analyzed?  Is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area an example of afforestation spiral shelter theory being proven successfully?   In 1972, the parks department planted, or afforested 660 acres of afforestation area as a tree nursery in a greening programme for the City of Saskatoon.  The various trees selected were planted not in straight rows, but rather in circular patterns throughout the land allotment.  What has been noted by horticulturists, and foresters in the comparison of trees planted in semi-circles as opposed to trees planted in straight rows?  How does snow accumulate and what is the effect of seasonal drought and flooding? How does wind react upon trees planted in straight lines, and what is the wind pattern, if trees are planted in spirals?  What can be learned of this practice to improve agricultural methods?  Saskatchewan is a windy province, and is subject to years of drought and high water tables, will a spiral windbreak affect the wind and water cycle on agricultural concerns in our province?

“We submit that water must be a basic consideration in all our national and earth -wide forest programmes; streams and rivers must be restored to their natural motion; and floods and droughts must be eliminated.  Forests and woodlands are intimately linked with biological, social and spiritual well-being.  The minimum tree cover for safety is one-third of the total land area.  Every catchment area should have at least this proportion of tree cover made up of mixed species, including broad-leaf trees, mono-culture in any form being injurious to the land.” segment from The Men of the Trees; The New Earth Charter

“We’re stabilizing the sand with a series of spiral shelters – rows of trees planted in semicircles to catch the winds and create vortices of air,” explains Baker. “The same thing would be valuable on the Canadian prairies where straight shelter belts cause snow to accumulate.” Star Weekly Toronto, On January 15 1972. article title “He’s top man on the world totem pole”

Branta canadensis
Branta canadensis Canada Goose

Ken Liddells’s Column The Calgary Herald Nov 11 1971″He [Baker] says the fight to prevent the spread of the desert is being won. One tool is a series of spiral shelter belts, with openings for grazing cattle. It is effective for most directions of the wind. The funnels lead into circular enclosures to create vortices of air. It would, he said, be valuable on the Canadian Prairies where straight shelter belts cause snow to accumulate and where “the mining of wheat” will be mourned once again, because the dust bowl of the United States is again creeping over that land.”

SandhillCrane
Grus canadensis Sandhill Crane

Trees also break the strength of the wind, creating shelter for other life forms and lesser species of vegetation.  The planting of shelter-belts (best in spiral form) reduces both the wind speed and the dehydration of the soil, creating microclimates that help the soil against erosion through the provision of additional humus and protection,  Indeed shelter belts can influence the evaporation rate over cultivated land by as much as 30 meters upwind and 120 meters downwind, and Canadian research has shown that farms with a third of their land as shelter belts are more productive than farms of equivalent area where there are no trees at all.

These shelter belts also trap Carbon dioxide (CO2), the heaviest naturally occuring atmospheric gas, found mostly in the lowest levels of the atmosphere, and an essential component of photosynthesis.  Increased CO2 under the right conditions will produce stronger photosynthesis.  When trees and hedgerows between fields are removed, productivity falls, because this causes a fall in carbon dioxide.  Trees should be revered as much as water, for together they are both the givers of life.” Hidden Nature: The Startling Insights of Viktor Schauberger By Alick Bartholomew

January2018-0081

Shelterbelts do not have to be planted in rigid, straight lines. A curved shelterbelt on a natural topographical contour line around the north and west sides of your farmyard will look more pleasing.

Shelterbelts can follow the contour of a valley or creek, run in an angle, or even have a circular shape around the yard site. The main consideration is to keep the spacing parallel between rows for ease of between-row cultivation and maintenance. Farmyard shelterbelts Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

The afforestation areas were planted with “the following tree species…Amercian and Siberian Elm, Manitoba Maple, Green Ash, Poplar, Willow, Colorado Spruce, Scotch Pine and Caragana.” The Trembling Aspen, Snowberry, Buffaloberry are examples of native species also prevalent in the afforestation areas.

As a pioneer in afforestation which is applauded in contemporary times as the earth requires trees for “Carbon Sequestration”, and for the “cooling effect” of the summer tree canopy, reducing the heating effect from Climate Change locally. The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the Afforestation area formerly named “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park were planted uniquely, and could be considered pioneers in Richard St. Barbe Baker’s Spiral Shelterbelt planting theory.

A tractor operated by the City of Saskatoon Parks Department purchased a special tree planting machine to afforest the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the Afforestation area formerly named “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park. The planting process at the afforestation areas began along an outside boundary, and the driver proceeded creating a weaving pattern. The rows would diverge as much as forty feet from the centre line, producing a greater naturalized forest effect rather than strict rows extending linearly. Weaving in and out spirally, and in a curvi-linear fashion creating a much more natural, effect mimicking the genius of Gaia, Mother Nature, herself and her wisdom.

For more information:

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Twitter: St Barbe Baker

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”.  Post to MVA 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5  Please and thank you!

Membership in the Saskatoon Nature Society  “supports nature conservation projects and [the society] is an active advocate for the preservation of plant and animal habitats”.

Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition ~ an active group interested in forest management~ or make a donation to “Save our Saskatchewan” [SOS] Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

Did you know???

The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Indisputably, fossil-fuel emissions alone have increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere by about 30 percent since the start of the Industrial Revolution in the late 1700s. Oceans and plants help to offset this flux by scrubbing some of the gas out of the air over time, yet carbon dioxide concentrations continue to grow. The inevitable result of pumping the sky full of greenhouse gases is global warming. Karl

Did you know that “an acre of trees absorbs enough CO2 over one year to equal the amount produced by driving a car 26,000 miles.” Most leases assume an average driver would drive 15,000 to 18,000 km a year. American Forests reports that “In one year, an acre of forest can absorb twice the CO2 produced by the average car’s annual mileage…” and very interestingly “Two mature trees provide enough oxygen for one person to breathe over the course of a year!”

This is why Richard St. Barbe Baker said: “We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees.   As far a forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today.  The only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.”

Enter in your estimated personal carbon emissions in this Carbon dioxide emission footprint calculator and offset estimator which will give you an indication of how many trees you will need to plant this year to offset your carbon emissions. How many have you planted already this year? Your electricity usage kwh/month can be read from your monthly utility bill. Monitoring your automobile odometer will give an indications of miles or kilometers travelled in a month.

“At a global scale, grasslands store 34% of the global terrestrial stock of carbon ecosystems, just behind forests (39%) with agro-ecosystems (17%) also important.” What are Native grasslands worth?

“In the report “The Value of BC’s Grasslands: Exploring Ecosystem Values and Incentives for Conservation” (2009), Wilson found that the value of carbon stored in grassland soils is worth an additional annual value of $438/ha (or $177 per acre; that is, $187 in 2012 dollars), and the value of carbon uptake is worth an estimated $28.46/ha (or $11.52 per acre; that is $12.19 in 2012 dollars) each year.”What are Native grasslands worth?

What are our forests and trees worth? Our forests and trees are natural carbon sequesters, and are vitally important to scrub our carbon emissions from the air. It is so wonderful to reduce carbon emissions, and drive fuel efficient cars, and convert to energy efficient appliances, however there is still carbon emissions produced. So don’t forget the other side of the equation. The only way to remove carbon emissions from the air are to plant more trees, conserve more wetlands, afforest more areas.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the afforestation area formerly known as George Genereux Urban Regional Park, are amazing examples, as they self propagate tree saplings yearly, increasing the carbon sequestration exponentially annually. Now if only there were more afforestation areas!!!

Richard St. Barbe Baker encouraged everyone to make a solemn promise to do one good deed each day, plant ten trees, seedlings or seeds each year, and take care of Trees everywhere.*

Technology is notorious for engrossing people so much that they don’t always focus on balance and enjoy life at the same time. ~Paul Allen

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

carbon & tree facts arborenvironmental alliance.

Carbon dioxide emission footprint calculator and offset estimator. Carbonify.com.

Forest Facts. American Forests.

Karl, Thomas R. and Kevin E. Trenberth. The Human Impact on Climate. How much of a disruption do we cause? The much-awaited answer could be ours by 2050, but only if nations of the world commit to long-term climate monitoring now. Scientific American December 1999, PP. 100-105. 1999. Scientific American reprinted Environment Annual Edition 2002/2003 21st Edition. Editor John L. Allen. McGraw-Hill/Dushkin. Article 26. P. 173. ISBN 0-07-250682-2.

Trees absorb a fifth of carbon emissions pumped out by humans. The Telegraph.
What are Native Prairie Grasslands Worth? Why it pays to Conserve this Endangered Ecosystem. Ranchers Stewardship Alliance Inc. Chris Nykoluk Consulting. 2013

For more information:
You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

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The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Climate Change and Afforestation

Climate change is being tackled by reducing the use of fossil fuels, limiting and reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases in an effort to mitigate atmospheric Carbon Dioxide. Changing to clean, renewable energy sources does indeed, reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Reducing emissions is just one side of the equation. Why do climate change discussions focus on reducing CO2 emissions, and not the carbon harvest effected by trees?

This report looks at the method of alleviating climate change by increasing carbon sequestration. Tree planting is an option as afforested lands can sequester between 2.2 and 9.5 metric tons of CO2 per year!Gorte

“The dynamics can be understood using a bathtub analogy in which the water level represents the stock of atmospheric CO 2. Like any stock, atmospheric CO2 rises only when the inflow to the tub (emissions, E ) exceeds the outflow (net removal, R ), is unchanging only when inflow equals outflow ( E = R ) and falls only when outflow exceeds inflow ( R > E ).”Sterman Reducing E Emissions or “the inflow into the bath tub” is truly important to affect climate change as can be seen from the “bath tub analogy.” Yet, it is vitally important to consider the “outflow out of the tub” or R, the net removal, which is expressed in the quantity of trees, forests, oceans, wetlands, marshes which act to absorb atmospheric carbon.

“Trees help by removing (sequestering) CO2 from the atmosphere during photosynthesis to form carbohydrates that are used in plant structure/function and return oxygen back into the atmosphere as a byproduct. Roughly half of the greenhouse effect is caused by CO2. Therefore, trees act as carbon sinks, alleviating the greenhouse effect”UFN

“Afforestation, reforestation and other forms of conservational forestry methods are often thought to be used for stopping the effects of climate change by reducing atmospheric carbon.”Pomerantz

“The Kyoto Accord on climate change requires developed countries to achieve C02-emissions reduction targets, but permits them to charge uptake of carbon (C) in terrestrial (primarily forest) ecosystems against emissions. Countries such as Canada hope to employ massive afforestation programs to achieve Kyoto targets.”van Kooten

“The Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change commits Canada to reducing its CO2 emissions to levels that are 6% below those in 1990. In addition to reducing industrial emissions, biologically-based carbon sinks can used to meet this target.”Johnston

“The Kyoto Protocol is an international environmental treaty and requires ratified countries to commit themselves to an appropriate reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG), which contributes to global warming and potentially impacts human society in many ways. In contrast to reduce GHG by industrial sectors, afforestation on fallow farm land has obviously become an important alternative method to expand the potential pool of carbon stock in terrestrial ecosystems.”Lin

” Carbon sequestration is one of many benefits of planting trees on land that has not been forested in a long time. Others include ecosystem health, economic health, and ultimately human health”Bird

As a result, an answer is found for how is it possible to better climate change locally?

” We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees.   As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.”

BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Bird, Neil D. and Eric Boysen. The Carbon Sequestration Potential from Afforestation in Ontario Climate Change. Research Information Note. Note Number 5. 2007

Dabas, Manoj and Shubhra Bhatla. Carbon Sequestration through Afforestation: Role of Tropical Industrial Plantations. Vol. 25, No. 5 (Aug., 1996), pp. 327-330 Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Stable URL

Gorte, Ross W. U.S. Tree Planting for Carbon Sequestration. Specialist in Natural Resources Policy. Congressional Research Service. 7-5700. R40562/ May 4, 2009

Johnston, M., S. Kulshreshtha, and T. Baumgartner. The potential for carbon sequestration through afforestation in Saskatchewan: An ecological-economic analysis. Forest Ecosystems Branch. Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management. Prince Albert, SK. Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Saskatchewan, Forest Ecosystems Branch, Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management, Regina, SK.

Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC. IPCC, 2000 – Robert T. Watson, Ian R. Noble, Bert Bolin, N. H. Ravindranath, David J. Verardo and David J. Dokken (Eds.)
Cambridge University Press, UK. pp 375
Available from Cambridge University Press, The Edinburgh Building Shaftesbury Road, Cambridge CB2 2RU ENGLAND
Summary for Policymakers. IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland. pp20.
Available from IPCC Secretariat in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Spanish and Russian. The Nobel Foundation.

Lin, Chinsu and Chun-Hsiung Lin. Comparison of carbon sequestration potential in agricultural and afforestation farming systems National Chiayi University. Department of Forestry and Natural Resourcs. Taiwan. Scientia Agricola. Print version ISSN 0103-9016. Sci. agric. (Piracicaba, Braz.) vol.70 no.2 Piracicaba Mar./Apr. 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0103-90162013000200006

Ni, Yuanming et al. The Global potential for carbon capture and storage from forestry. Carbon Balance Management. 2016. Dec. 11 : 3 2016 Feb 6. doi: 10.1186/s13021-016-0044-y.

Pomerantz, Celeste and Jason Donev Afforestation. Energy Education. University of Calgary.

Schopfhauser, Wolfgang. Chapter 3 Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Mitigation through Forestry and Wood Industry. 3.1 World Forests: The Area for Afforestation and their Potential for Fossil Carbon Sequestration and Substitution. Confederation of European Paper Industries. Belgium.

Sigurdsson, Bjarni D. and Arnor Snorrason. Carbon sequestration by afforestatin and revegetation as a measn of limiting net-CO2 emissions in Iceland. Biotechnol. Agron. Soc. Environ. 200 4(4), 303-307.

Sterman, John D. and Linda Booth Sweeney. Understanding public complacency about climate change: adults mental models of climate change violate conservation of matter. Climatic Change (2007) 80:213-238 doi 10.1007/s 10584-006-91074-5. January 9, 2007. Springer Science and Business Media B.V. 2007.

Trees Improve Air Quality Urban Forestry Network (UFN).

van Kooten, G. Corenelius, et al. Economics of afforestation for carbon sequestration in western Canada. The Forestry Chronicle. Natural Resources Canada. Government of Canada.

Williams, Jeremy,et al Tree Canada Afforestation and Reforestation Protocol. Version 2.0. April 2015. Tree Canada.

“When the trees go, the rain goes, the climate deteriorates, the water table sinks, the land erodes and desert conditions soon appear”.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority at 402 Third Avenue South Saskatoon, SK S7K 3G5 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area 😉

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker