Benefits of Shelterbelts – SB- Decision Support System

Eventbrite Registration for zoom link Tues Sept 21 7:00 Webinar registration Dr. Colin Laroque Shelterbelts and Agroforestry

The Shelterbelt Decision Support System [SB-DSS] – The Shelterbelt Decision Support System [SB-DSS] – how does this free tool give value to farmers and the potential for cash in pocket?

“in its latest climate change action plan, the Saskatchewan government is proposing to pay farmers for storing carbon, not just charging agricultural producers for emitting carbon into the atmosphere, “ reports U of S News. Dr. Colin Laroque from the University of Saskatchewan will present information about this free app – a tool for Saskatchewan farmers – to place a cash value on sustainable shelterbelts. The Free app is the Shelterbelt Decision Support System [SB – DSS] calculates the carbon offset value of shelterbelts, and isn’t that a fantastic way for farmers to know what their shelterbelt is worth under the $50 per tonne CO2E tax expected to roll out in 2022. This app is invaluable, as it also helps to suggest the best types of trees depending on the location in the province along with planting guidelines. Not only will farmers reap the environmental benefits, they can see the carbon offset value for the carbon pricing system.

Tues Sept 21 7:00 Webinar registration Dr. Colin Laroque Shelterbelts and Agroforestry

Dr. Colin Laroque Agroforestry and the Shelterbelt DSS App
Dr. Colin Laroque Agroforestry and the Shelterbelt DSS App

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1979 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

” If you devote 22% of a quarter section, that’s 160 acres, to trees, you can double the crops.’ It’s a question of planting trees strategically. The trees reduce the speed of the wind, modify the climate, they modify the difference in temperature from day and night, and above all the trees make it possible for the earthworms to come into the land, and the earthworm casts its own weight every 24 hours. And a well-populated acre of worms casts 30 tonnes of worm castings per acre per year. That’s equal to 30 tonnes of farmyard manure on that land.” Richard St. Barbe Baker who also explains , that “We’re stabilizing the sand with a series of spiral shelters – rows of trees planted in semicircles to catch the winds and create vortices of air. The same thing would be valuable on the Canadian prairies where straight shelter belts cause snow to accumulate.”

National Forest Week The last full week of September. Maple Leaf Day the Wednesday of that week.
National Forest Week The last full week of September. Maple Leaf Day the Wednesday of that week.

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

Sat. Sept 18 7:00 Ryan Brook Saskatoon’s Wildlife—the real night life in Saskatoon! Saskatoon’s trail cams reveal who’s who. 

Sept 19 2:00 Nature Snapshot in Time

Sun Sep. 19 2:00 Forestry Farm Walking Tour

Canada-wide CLS environmental education program explores historical time lines Sun. Sep 19 7:00

Mon Sept 20 2:00 Flag raising Ceremony at City Hall – National Forest Week

Mon Sept 20 7:00 The Urban Forest and Climate Change

During National Forest Week enjoy the self-guided SOS Tree Tour of unique trees in our fair city!

Tues Sept 21 7:00  Dr. Colin Laroque Shelterbelts SB- Decision Support System and Agroforestry

Wed. Sept 22 Maple Leaf Day 7:00 National Healing Forests Truth and Reconciliation

Thurs Sept 23 7:00 Urban forests and greenspaces enhance Saskatoon’s quality of life.

Fri Sept Sep 24 at 7:00 pm When and Where did you see What?!?

Sat Sept 25 7:00 PaRx in Saskatchewan, PaRx, Canada’s First National Prescription Program has officially arrived in Saskatchewan!

Sunday Sunday Sep 26 at 2:00 Forest connections and guided walk

Sunday Sep 26, 2021 at 7:00 pm Our Forests.  Are They Alive?

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Share this:

Pollinator Paradise YXE

Wild About Saskatoon has started a programme called Pollinator Paradise YXE.

What do you think of a 175,218 square meter allocation for a YXE pollinator paradise?

For an urban city like Saskatoon planning to meet one million residents by 2063, it is wise to show environmental leadership. The City of Saskatoon cannot do it alone, residents have to come to the forefront to help with pollinator garden planting.

Wild About Saskatoon mentions that “the first 50 people to certify your back yard, garden, or school yard as a Pollinator Paradise will receive our beautiful Pollinator Paradise YXE sign (retail value $39.95) for free.”

Share the Wild About Saskatoon Facebook Posts

Fill out the form regarding Pollinator Paradise Certification

There is more information and YouTube videos on Pollinator Paradise YXE.

Query? Should there be pollinator gardens planted in the two afforestation areas by making use of the Utility Right-Of-Ways? What would it mean? Checking out the ROW zones of the afforestation areas on Google Earth there would be:

There is the potential for a whopping 141,536 square meters of pollinator gardens at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

AND

There is also potential for another 33,682 square metes of pollinator gardens at George Genereux Urban Regional Park

AND it would mean invasive species would be much much easier to keep in check, and the cost of maintenance would go way way down, and the numbers of pollinators would be greatly benefited by a total of 175,218 square meters of pollinator gardens. Well, part of it could be food forests if low growing berry bushes were planted in the boundary zone, and pollinator gardens in the wire zone of the right of ways.

What do you think? Is 175,218 square meters of pollinator paradise something which would show good environmental and pollinator-friendly management practices? Is it a good idea?

Already from the closure of the east side of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area to motorized vehicular traffic, the number of native plants is exponentially increasing without motorized vehicles using the urban regional park as a road bringing in invasive plants from everywhere. There is starting to be a rebound with an increase in native plants, and numbers of species already – without an anthropogenic management plan, just letting Mother Nature do the native flora plantings!

There are a few more resources included as follows:

Managing Rights of Way ROW for Pollinators: A practical Guide for Managers

Monarch Butterfly Milkweed Garden 101

Pollinators and Rights-Of-Way Integrated Vegetation Management – How to Build a Pollinator Eco-system

Increasing Seed of Wildflowers Valuable to Pollinators

Bee ID Guide

Roadside Vegetation and Rights of Way The Ohio State University

NAPPC Plight of the Pollinator Maintaining ROW Access and Pollinator Access North American Pollinator Protection Campaign

Interseeding Wildflowers to Diversify Grasslands for Pollinators

Build a Bee Condo

Pollinator Corridors under power lines BC Hydro Power Smart Prepare and Submit a ROW proposal

5 Things kinds can do to Help Pollinators

Bumble Bee Conservation A pamphlet

Gardening for Pollinators U.S. Forest Service

Landscaping for Pollinators. Small Scale…Large Scale… Penn State Department of Entomology

Buying Bee-Safe Plants

Habitat Highways National Wildlife Federation

Pollinator Puzzle

Pollinator Habitat Scorecard

Roadsides and Rights-of-Ways Minnesota Department of Agriculture

Pollinators and Roadsides: Best management practices for Managers and Decision Makers

Xerces Society Native Thistle Conservation Guide

Rethinking Rights of Way Landscapes to benefit pollinator species Science Borealis

Nesting Resources for Pollinator Habitats

Rights of Way, Roads and Pollinators Webinar

Pollinators Department of Highways Pollinator Friendly Practices and Information under FHWA

Who are the pollinators?

Lifelines YouTube Video Utility Rights of Way and pollinators

Mission Monarch

Pollinators and Roadsides – Linn County

Endangered Pollinators

Rights of Way Habitat Restoration Program Canadian Wildlife Federation

How to Create a Pollinator-friendly garden David Suzuki Foundation

Canadian Chapter of the Rights-of-Way Habitat Working Group (ROWHWG) rownetwork@cwf-fcf.org

Bumble Bee Watch Download apps for iOS or Android.

Powerline Right-Of-Way management and flower-visiting insects: How vegetation management can promote pollinator diversity Scientific paper on journal PLOS One

Budburst: Budburst brings together researchers, horticulturists, and community scientists on a shared journey to uncover the stories of plants affected by human impacts on the environment. Budburst tells these stories through data collection, data sharing, education, and personal connections.

Catch the Buzz – Pollinator Habitat in Utility Rights-Of-Way Northern Arizona University

Find out what else you can do to help Bring Back the Pollinators.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Donate your vehicle to Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.  to raise funds for afforestation areas. Click here to find out more. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

The environment is where we all meet; where we all have a mutual interest; it is the one thing all of us share.

Lady Bird Johnson

Water and Afforestation

March would not be complete without acknowledging World Water Day celebrated on March 22. The theme for 2021 is Valuing Water! #WorldWaterDay and Water2me.

So when you are out enjoying the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, know that learning about the underground natural springs, the wetlands and the formation of the West Swale via the Yorath Island Glacial Spillway is a great way to learn about the South Saskatchewan Watershed which supplies the City of Saskatoon drinking water. A valuable commodity which is supplied by a “free” ecosystem service. This service will only provide supply if we take care of our ecosystem.

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Water ~ critical long range planning

“Of the earth’s thirty billion acres, already nine billion acres are desert. And if a man loses a third of his skin, he dies; plastic surgeons say “He’s had it.” And if a tree loses one-third of its bark, it dies. And if the earth loses one-third of its green mantle of trees, it will die. The water table will sink beyond recall and life on this planet will become impossible. It’s being skinned alive today…” Richard St. Barbe Baker

What is your story about how you value water? Do you value the community volunteer Clean Green Community Scene trash cleanups which keep the West Swale wetlands water fresh and clean? Do you value the Chappell Marsh wetlands located in both Chappell Marsh Conservation Area and in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area which provide habitat for a number of species at risk waterfowl? Check out the iNaturalist.pdf pamphlet!

There are stories indeed about water and how the stewards and stakeholders of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestion Areas value water on a variety of levels.

Did you take part in the Government of Canada freshwater management consultation? The consultation paved the way to creating a Canada Water Agency to keep our water fresh and clean! 😉 Read the Government of Canada’s Discussion Paper “Toward the Creation of a Canada Water Agency.” The University of Saskatchewan also discusses this project.

Do you value water? Do you conserve and preserve water at home? Do you appreciate walks alongside the water’s edge and observe the blackbirds, ducks, geese and herons? Do you participate in the community cleanups to keep our wetlands fresh and healthy?

For the Take It Outside Winter Staycation challenge. Email us your wetlands photograph out at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Download our local wetlands bird checklist Pamphlet.

YouTubePlaylist
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.com
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas
Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

“I thought how lovely and how strange a river is. A river is a river, always there, and yet the water flowing through it is never the same water and is never still. It’s always changing and is always on the move. And over time the river itself changes too.

Aiden Chambers

Life is like the river, sometimes it sweeps you gently along and sometimes the rapids come out of nowhere.

What is a Friends Group?

 

The Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. was formed as a non-profit incorporation in the same manner as other Saskatoon non-profit groups which support and advocate for their benefactor, respectively.

Friends of the Library  is “a fundraising and advocacy group for Saskatoon Public Library”.  It is known that “Libraries need Friends – it’s just that simple. In fact,… many public libraries were established through the efforts of community members who understood the value of libraries to their communities and also understood that libraries needed community support to survive”

Friends of the Forestry Farm House  has a “mandate to increase awareness of the history of the Saskatoon Forestry Farm Park & Zoo by:a) preserving the Superintendent’s Residence and b) encouraging interpretation of the site.”

Friends of the Bowl Foundation is “about modernizing Saskatoon Minor Football Field allowed us to enhance the visitor and user experience by adding offices, change rooms, meeting spaces, and event and entertainment facilities.”  The Friends is “about rising to every challenge and tackling obstacles head on, because we know that adversity builds character.”

So the question is, if libraries, heritage sites, and sports complexes need “friends” why not forests?  Do not forests and trees need “friends” to raise money and support them? Do not forests and trees need “friends” to raise money and support them, especially when they are absolutely so beautiful to wander through in all the seasons of the year?

The afforestation areas are prime historical, natural and geological heritage sites.  Two afforestation areas have survived since 1972 tree planting as a Saskatoon parks department tree nursery, a heritage testament to Saskatoon as a “Green Survival” City.  The site’s dramatic and diverse landscape topography dominated by natural features, particularly swales and wetlands, and diverse varieties of mature trees, shrubs, plants and ponds that achieve a pastoral appearance; – the landscape of approximately 660 acres in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and additional 160 acres at George Genereux Urban Regional Park are laid out in a park-like manner with planning in the “picturesque” style, design, with the placement and juxtaposition of afforested and natural features that combine to create panoramic perspectives that include mature trees, shrubs.

The afforestation areas feature the preservation of the original indigenous aspen groves and tracts of undisturbed and uncultivated moist mixed grass prairie vegetation throughout the framework of the park. The natural and original setting in the South Saskatchewan River watershed, part of the Moist Mixed Grasslands near Saskatoon that contain Cottonwood, Aspen Grove and Mixed woodland forests, numerous springs, wetlands, and marshes, etc.

The natural green corridor which provides habitats to a variety of indigenous plants, trees and fauna intermixed with drought resistant specimens of exotic species of trees advised under the leading authority of the foremost PFRA of the time.    The afforestation areas are compliant with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change featuring closed forest formations of various storeys and undergrowth and are conforming to the forest concept under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity featuring a complex, continuous, mature forest system of trees, animals and humans.  The afforestation areas act as natural carbon sinks, maintains biodiversity, provides flood control, creates breathable air, carbon storage, healthy maintenance of soils, water purifications, micro- and macro-climate control, and nutrient cycling.

The forests are valued at over Thirty Nine Billion Dollars and act as carbon sinks.  They are named after Richard St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., L.L.D. and George Genereux who are two outstanding Saskatoon personages.  Additionally, the wetlands namesake, Chappell Marsh commemorates Canadian National Railway General Superintendent Saskatchewan district Benjamin Thomas Chappell who was honoured as Chief Iron Horse, during a sacred ceremonial function by eight Cree chiefs.

How can you help?  Become a member at only $20/year, make a donation, volunteer to help out or serve on the board of directors.  Donations and membership can be made through Paypal or Etransfer using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com  Thank you kindly.

Just as “Friends” support libraries for instance, it is wonderful to acknowledge the efforts of community members who understand the value of forests to their communities and also understand that forests need community support to survive.

If you value your time spent wandering through the woods, consider becoming a member, at $20/year it is less than a movie for one night, and you know you are contributing to saving the forest for many, many days of forest outings throughout the year!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
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Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
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“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

 

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

 

Over Thirty eight billion dollars.

 

What is the value of trees?  Do trees have an economic value to the city of Saskatoon?

“A large, healthy tree can be valued as high as $16,000, a city report says. The same report estimates Saskatoon’s elm trees, on both private and public property, are worth at least $500 million. “(Tank, 2017)

In 1972, Saskatoon’s park and recreation board has “ventured into a massive project of planting 200,000 trees for local parks on 600 acres of land south of Diefenbaker Park and south of the CNR station.”(Cronkite, 1972)

What would 200,000 trees x $16,000 calculate to?  Three billion two hundred million dollars ($3,200,000,000) is the net worth of the mature trees on the afforestation areas.  This figure does not include the new tree growth or native growth such as Trembling Aspen and shrubbery which are also coming along in the afforestation areas.

James Wood, president of the SOS (Save our Saskatchewan) Elms Coalition Inc. says that, “Trees are very important to Saskatoon people historically.” (Tank, 2018)

Saskatoon was a pioneer leading the way in afforestation in 1972.  “Afforestation and reforestation projects help mitigate climate change, increase the resilience of local communities, produce numerous sustainable development co benefits, and capitalize on the synergies among the Rio Conventions, helping also to combat desertification and preserve biodiversity” Christiana Figueres UNFCCC (2013)

If the value of a mature tree 50 years old is taken at $193,250, then what are the afforestation areas consisting of 200,000 mature trees planted in 1972 worth to the City of Saskatoon?  The trees in the afforestation area are 44 years old, so in the year 2022, 200,000  * $193,250 works out to a figure of thirty eight billion six hundred fifty three million ($38,653,000,000) or roughly thirty nine billion dollars.  The value is actually much, much more than this if the entirety of the afforestation area of 2018 is factored in including trees not afforested in 1972 such as the trees already existing on the property,  new sapling growth, the mature Trembling Aspen groves, buffaloberry and snowberry bushes which have accumulated in the afforestation area.

Of concern to all! A tree is worth $193,250

According to Professor T.M.Das of the University of Calcutta. A tree living for 50 years will generate $31,250 worth of oxygen, provide $62,000 worth of air pollution control, control soil erosion and increase soil fertility to the tune of $31,250, recycle $37,500 worth of water and provide a home for animals worth $31,250. This figure does not include the value of fruits, lumber or beauty derived from trees. Just another sensible reason to take care of our forests. (Update forestry)

On average, each Elm Tree provides the City of Saskatoon, overall benefits of: $257 every year.

One Elm tree will reduce atmospheric carbon by 1,506 pounds (0.753 tons) at a “carbon price of $50/ton”  How many mature trees are in the afforestation areas?   Over 200,000.  Perhaps each various species will remove about this many tons of carbon, the savings to the City of Saskatoon every year in carbon sequestration is seven million five hundred thirty thousand dollars $7,530,000.

The National Tree Calculator states that ” Most car owners of an “average” car (mid-sized sedan) drive 12,000 miles generating about 11,000 pounds of CO2 every year.”  Saskatoon’s census metropolitan area population on the 2016 census was 295,095.   

Fines are imposed in Saskatoon for” unauthorized excavations, removal, relocation, pruning or damage in part of whole of existing trees”, and this is covered under City Council Policy, #C09-011 entitled “Trees on Public Property” (1989) or the Parks Bylaw #7667.  These bylaws have a formula for a city appraiser to calculate the value of trees as it is recognized that “trees on City property are “living” assets owned by the City of Saskatoon and maintained as a legacy for the citizens of Saskatoon. ”

The afforestation areas are not in municipal reserve placed before the city by former city councillor Pat Lorje April 25, 2016, and reviewed May 39, 2017.   As the afforestation areas are not a part of the city’s urban reserves, nor do the afforestation areas belong to city’s park space inventory there is no funding available by any city department.

That although there is some monetary value to the afforestation areas, these facts remain;

  • Nothing is financed, nor planned for the general public in regards to an urban regional park as the afforestation areas are NOT in municipal reserve, and not in city park space.
  • Nothing is similarly in the long range planning in terms of curbing the illegal activity, and illegal trespass which have gone on for years, in the forms of fencing or gates to prevent access by motorized vehicle.  The afforestation areas belong to land bank, and as such there is NO  money that the city can allocate to the afforestation areas for any purpose whatsoever.
  • Nothing is in the planning stages for erecting signs so that the vacant looking lands are defined as city owned lands, as there is no money allocated for the afforestation areas.
  • The afforestation areas named as urban regional parks in 1979 by city council only and not by the parks department.  The afforestation areas belong to land bank,  they are NOT in municipal reserve, and not in city park space.
  • The afforestation areas were ‘preserved in perpetuity’ on paper by city council in 1972 and not in real life as has been evident by the several community volunteer clean ups removing huge amounts of trash and the ‘George Genereux” afforestation area which has received no clean up at all.
  • There have been grass fires in the afforestation areas over the years, and two massive grass fires at the nearby “Buck’s auto parts” requring fire protective services from both the City of Saskatoon and the RM of Corman Park 344.  If a grass fire gets away and becomes a forest fire in the afforestation area, it would have devastating consquences for the neighbouring residents of Cedar Villa Estates, and for those train cars carrying flammable goods in the adjacent CN Chappell Yards Train station.  There is NO funding to fill in the existing large fire hole built to burn wood pallets for campfire parties, or convert it to a fire pit of city or provincial standards.  As you will see on reading this article, there is no funding for signs in regards to any fires in the afforestation areas.
  • The city and the MVA have the opportunity to follow up on Truth and Reconciliation for our first nations peoples of Saskatoon. “We respectfully acknowledge that the afforestation areas exist upon Treaty 6 territory and the traditional lands of First Nations and Métis people”. However, as the afforestation areas are not part of a municipal reserve, there is NO carry through to protect, conserve, or take care of take care of the riparian woodlands, wetlands, or grasslands of the afforestation areas in any planning at all.

Is it really true that nothing can be done?

Bibliography

Barrett, Brett. City investigating unauthorized tree removal near River Valley. Global News.  May 5, 2014

Census 2016: Saskatoon third-fastest growing city in Canada.  The Canadian Press.  February 8, 2017

City of Saskatoon. Trees. Protect Saskatoon Trees

City of Saskatoon.  Tree Protection Policy.

Cronkite, Kathy.  Green Survival  War against ecology abuse.  1972

Emad, Eric.  Determine the value of a tree.  2018 Penton Media Inc

Illegal Tree Removal could Mean Stiffer Fines.  Turf and Rec.  June 14, 2017

Update What is the value of a tree? Update Forestry Michigan State University. republished 2018 Stack Exchange Inc;

Levy, Bryn.  Neighbours angry after city trees cut down. 650 CKOM.April 24, 2017.

Neilson, Anne Sofie Elberg, Andrew J. Plantinga, and Ralph J. Alig.  New Cost Estimates for Carbon Sequestration Through Afforestation in the United States.  United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service NW-GTR-888  March 2014 ” carbon price of $50/ton”

The National Tree Benefit Calculator Casey Trees and Davey Tree Expert Co.

New Trees planted in Regina’s Victoria Park.  CBC News.  April 23, 2017

April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 report.  Society to prevent Dutch Elm Disease. “According 1999 tree inventory and value calculation at that time, AB has an estimated 750,000 mature elm trees. A total of 250,000 elms, valued at $700 million dollars”

Tank, Phil. City considers restricting private tree removal in Saskatoon Saskatoon Star Phoenix. January 15, 2018

Tank, Phil.  Higher fines, business ban considered for illegal tree removal   Saskatoon StarPhoenix. June 14, 2017

Saskatchewan Judge uses fines to chop illegal tree harvesters down to size.  CTV News.  November 12, 2014

Tree Protection Fact Sheet.  City of Saskatoon

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
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Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

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“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

 

“From the forest and wilderness come the tonics and bark which brace mankind…A town is saved, not more by the righteous men in it than by the woods and swamps that surround it…”
-Henry David Thoreau

 

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.'”
Richard St. Barbe Baker