The Afforestation Area Tourist

May 26 – June 2, 2019 is Tourism Week in Canada

On behalf of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, thank you for taking the opportunity to behold this very first ever Special Report for our afforestation area tourist. Where to begin? That is the question. How much do you know about these afforestation areas? These wilderness empires,  namely our two afforestation areas have been stealing hearts with their expansive beauty and this heartfelt outpouring of love from around the world, and close to home is what will snatch them from leveling forces of development. They are likely to prove the richest, noblest heritage of our city.   Here the world is at play, here are scenes ever new and that will greatly help to keep the city young.

The tourist who moves about to see and hear and open himself to all the influences of the places which condense centuries of human greatness is only a man in search of excellence.Max Lerner

Richard St. Barbe Baker Word Cloud
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional park, Saskatoon, SK A Statistical Word Cloud Report sampling

“It is as if Nature in these places had in self-defense devoted all her energies to scenery, proclaiming to the nation, ‘Here I will make playgrounds for the people. Here is nothing for commerce or industry. Here is natural beauty at its wildest and best. Elsewhere man must live by the  sweat of his brow. Here let him rest and play. Here I will rule supreme for all time.'”John Dickinson Sherman

These interesting afforestation areas are becoming every day more and more the subject of inquiry and personal investigation.

Why? Well, scenery is, without doubt, one of our most valuable resources.

The climate is varied, the wetlands are extensive, the grasslands are covered in roses and wild flowers, while those studying botany the treasures abound with a varied ecology of wonder, and the woodlands tempt the eyes with sightings of deer, moose, and woodpecker. The man of science is appeased with the thrill of a rich vein of geological history. The inquisitive traveler doubtless will ascertain statistical observations as they progress throughout the green spaces.

The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist see what he has come to see. G. K. Chesterton

It is our great hope and belief that they will become a marked factor in public education. Surely, these wonderlands mean much for the general welfare, and will help to develop greater men and women—to arouse enthusiasm for our native land, and for nature everywhere.

“Travel is the great
source of true wisdom.”
—Beaconsfield.

It is told that the Piute Indians recount a legend which goes like this. Just at the close of creation, woman was consulted. She called into existence the birds, the flowers, and the trees. That is the kind of a woman with whom to start a world. Our cities still need green places full of hope and beauty, with birds, flowers, and trees! With their help we may live long and happily and harmoniously upon a beautiful world.

Scenic parts of this poetic and primeval world—parts rich in loveliness and grandeur—are “preserved in perpetuity” for us. They contain splendid scenic and scientific features not elsewhere to be seen. The traveler might spend hours and hours in them without exhausting even their best attractions.

An afforestation area is an island of safety in this riotous world. Splendid forests, the wetlands that sparkle in glory, the wild flowers that charm and illuminate the earth, the wild deer of the woodland nooks and crannies, and the beauty of the birds, all have places of refuge which our afforestation areas provide.

Our afforestation areas are the fountain of life. They are without doubt a potential factor for good in our city life. They hold within their magic realm benefits that are health-giving, educational, economic; that further efficiency and ethical relations, and are inspirational. Every one needs to play, and to play out of doors. Without parks, afforestation areas and outdoor life all that is best in civilization would be smothered. To prevent our perishing, to save ourselves, to enable us to live at our best and happiest, afforestation areas are necessary. Within these areas is room—glorious room—room in which to find ourselves, in which to think and hope, to dream and plan, to rest and resolve.

 

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy from my having lived in it. “Richard St. Barbe Baker.

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Urgent Appeal For Help!

Hey everyone, George Genereux Urban Regional park, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area need your help!!!!

The above images represent both the George Genereux Urban Regional park, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area!!!

All you have to do is take some pictures!!!! Then upload them to social media with the tags #yxeGreenStrategy and #WintercityYXE

It’s that easy!!! Please comment on the photos which appear on social media if you think they are picturesque, and fantastic places to visit!

And to make it easier here are links to the facebook pages for George Genereux Urban Regional park social media facebook pages *** new ***  Please share this new page!!

Facebook group page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

 

 

What is it that you love about Saskatoon’s natural areas this winter??? Show it in a photo – a picture tells a thousand words!

How can the City of Saskatoon’s new department “Utilities and Environment” which includes Natural Area Standards, Urban Forest Management Plan and Green Strategy. make good decisions for the City of Saskatoon residents and for tourism to our great city?

Remember, too, that Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area has social media pages

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

 

 

Facebook: South West OLRA

Let’s get those pictures out there of Saskatoon’s naturalized areas, indeed. Thank you most kindly!!!

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5  To support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

  The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain. Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Saskatoon: World Tourism Site

 

If you have not visited, please come to Saskatoon for

World Tourism Day
27 September 2018

City of Saskatoon, SK, CA
City of Saskatoon, SK, CA

September 27, an amazing autumn day with the spectacular colour of golden leaves gracing the river bank, after revelling in a glorious summer season with balmy temperatures from Easter through to October.  Yet check out what Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada has to offer as a fantastic #WinterCityYXE. Any time of year is fantastic to visit the city of Saskatoon.

Mayor of Saskatoon, Charlie Clark writes “The has named Saskatoon #18 out of the top 52 places in the world to visit for 2018. The only Canadian City on the list. Highlighting the opening of the . Welcome World! Come for the art, stay for the people.”

Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall commented “Congratulations Saskatoon on being the only Canadian destination to rank in the 52 places to visit around the world. With the newly opened adding to our downtown experience, truly is a great place to see.”

“Did you know that Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada [#YXE] was the only Canadian destination to make it on the New York times list “52 places to visit around the world [ 52 places to Go in 2018 ~ A starter kit for exploring the world. ]

Check out the Saskatoon section of the New York Times facebook page for more spectacular Saskatoon sights!

Seth Sherwood, New York Times, writes of Saskatoon; “Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and other heavyweight 20th-century artists now have a home in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, thanks to the new Remai Modern museum. ”

Do indeed, when arriving in Saskatoon, check out the Remai Modern museum, and relax along the  South Saskatchewan River Valley with its amazing beaches especially those at Sutherland Beach, Chief Whitecap Park [Chief Whitecap Waterway], Fred Heal Canoe Launch [Map] and Poplar Bluffs Conservation Area.

While visiting Saskatoon [YXE] don’t forget to check out the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, for a walk amidst the trees and snap a photograph of a deer, squirrel,  Black-crowned NightHeron or bunny rabbit on your saunter.

Does this not just evoke the four Rs?  Everyone is familiar with the three R’s ~ Reading, ‘Riting and ‘Rithmetic In Saskatoon experience the four R’s ~reflection, rest, relaxation and renewal 😉

Bibliography

WinterCityYXE: Saskatoon’s Winter City Strategy City of Saskatoon Business & Development Planning Community Plans & Strategies

Events and Attractions City of Saskatoon

Feeling dreary about winter? City of Saskatoon trying to change thatNew strategy designed to improve winter life, economy, accessibility, culture CBC News Jan 24, 2017

Remai Modern museum

Saskatoon Winter City Strategy Update. January 10, 2017

Saskatooning Life in the City of Bridges
Tourism Saskatoon  ExploreYXE

Visitors. Meewasin Valley Authority

Yard Bridget Taking the chill off: Proposed Saskatoon budget includes temporary warming huts City to follow in Edmonton’s footsteps, inject $350k into Winter City Strategy CNC News Oct 17, 2017

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“In the words of Henry van Dyke, America’s greatest tree poet,
‘He that planteth a tree is a servant of God;
He provideth a kindness for many generations
And faces that he hath not seen shall bless him.’ ”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 “In the stillness of the mighty woods, man is made aware of the divine”
Richard St. Barbe Baker

Discover the Loggerhead Shrike price tag

‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’~Richard St. Barbe Baker

What is the price tag which the Saskatchewan Party places on the last

Monarch Butterfly or Baird’s Sparrow?

“We believe in the innate intelligence of… the country men and the workers, that they should be allowed to manage their own affairs. We believe they will put into their work not merely their hands and their feet, but their brains and their hearts. Each can experience the transcendental joy of creation, and can earn immortality and bestow immortality.~Richard St. Barbe Baker”

At a time when there are mandates to protect threatened species, it is definitely a time that our ecosystems and habitats deserve more funding and not less funding.

In the March 30, 2017 edition of the Saskatoon StarPhoenix newspaper, Phil Tank, writes that, “The Saskatchewan Party government introduced changes to the legislation this week that eliminate the requirement for set annual funding for the MVA [Meewasin Valley Authority] from the provincial government and the University of Saskatchewan.” Faced with less funding in 2016, MVA had no choice but to close its Interpretive Centre on July 1, 2016. This year, the provincial budget revealed that the MVA funding would sit at 500,000 or about half the annual amount. This $409,000 funding cut is an irony as among the land which are expected to be preserved, conserved, and maintained by the MVA are Crown lands. The question arises will the Saskatchewan Provincial parks ministry then step in to maintain their own lands within the MVA conservation zone? The Provincial Parks ministry owns about 2,610 acres of the 6,400 acres which MVA manages.

More funds, NOT LESS should be dedicated to saving the COSEWIC species of special concern: Monarch Butterfly, Common Nighthawk, Loggerhead Shrike, Barn Swallow, Mountain Bluebird, Horned Grebe, Northern Leopard Frog, Short-eared Owl, Baird’s Sparrow, Yellow Rail, Olive-sided Flycatcher, and Rusty Blackbird are all species within the MVA conservation zone along the South Saskatchewan River. These are just a very few of the protected species in danger of elimination in the South Saskatchewan River valley as determined by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada .

Our parks, South Saskatchewan rivershores, trails, historic sites all provide a critical and much needed wildlife habitat, ensure clean drinking water for residents of Saskatoon and all communities down stream, and offer countless and innumerable recreational activities. Visitors to Saskatoon have enjoyed visiting this river city with opportunities to hike, bicycle, or just take in the awe-inspiring beauty of numerous landmarks and breathtaking landscapes enhanced by the MVA conservation efforts since 1978. Reducing funding as the MVA comes up on their 40th anniversary would have a profound and tragic impact on the health and well-being of wildlife, landscapes and people. Any perceived short term savings would ultimately end up as gigantic economic costs in the long run. Without funding, the amazing riverbank scenes, and the wildlife habitat corridor would disintegrate.  Without funding  endangered species are pushed towards extinction.  Without funding there would be detrimental effects on the river, waterways, drinking water, and population health.  Without funding there would be a devastating effect on the civic economy.  Multi-use pathways would disappear. Without adequate funding, marshlands dry up, the world’s most endangered eco-system the temperate grasslands would vanish, and rivers, streams, and swales would get destroyed.

It may be thought of as an easy win for the Saskatchewan Party to implement cuts in conservation, however, such cuts could result in profound and maybe even irreversible consequences for Saskatchewan’s wildlife, landscapes and population. Do not let our future generations mitigate nature deficit disorder and be reduced to exploring and searching out nature in parking lots and fracking wells. Wouldn’t it be much better for our grandchildren, and great grandchildren to get a healthy dose of Vitamin N from our river valleys, swales, forests and native grasslands?

Our healthy river valley and parks create many millions in tourist and economic revenue every year, and support a vibrant river city economy of thousands of jobs.

To maintain wildlife populations, recover endangered species, and restore damaged eco-systems all require financial resources. With climate change, these needs and costs are rising exponentially.

As Saskatoon’s projected growth is set to hit 250,000 by 2025 and 380,000 by 2035, the provincial important wildlife habitat will rest within the MVA conservation zone as urban sprawl takes up valuable land which sensitive species rely upon. The plight of wildlife depends on funding for wildlife conservation and natural resource protection.

It is fantastic that ranchers and industry are monitored under The Wildlife Habitat Protection Act (WHPA) and that conservation practices are being adopted in rural areas, however the MVA educates the public on conservation practices in urban areas.

Please write a letter to your elected officials urging them to provide the resources and funding needed for engagement and education services, footpaths, biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. What is the cost to balance a $1.2 billion deficit? Actions have consequences, will it be the last of the Monarch Butterfly, or the extinction of the Horned Grebe? Let us hope not for goodness sakes, the Monarch Butterfly and Horned Grebe are invaluable, and should not be set at any price! In this modern technological era of progress and advancement don’t abandon the earth around us. Get out from behind your computer, set down your phone, go outside and pay attention to nature. If you wouldn’t mind, to everyone interested in paying attention to nature, write a letter to these following elected officials, speak out for the water, the land, the forests, and the myriad of creatures you see before its too late, please, and thank you. Also, please do check out the Meewasin Green Circle.

The elected and appointed officials are:

The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau,, P.C., M.P., Prime Minister of Canada, Ottawa

The Honourable Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Her Honour the Honourable Vaughn Solomon Schofield, S.O.M., S.V.M., Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan

Honorable Sheri Benson, Member of Parliament Constituency:Saskatoon West Email:Sheri.Benson@parl.gc.ca

The Honourable Brad Wall, Premier of Saskatchewan. Email premier@gov.sk.ca

Cabinet Minister
The Honourable Scott Moe, Minister of the Environment

Ms. Jennifer Campeau. Saskatchewan Party Saskatoon Fairview ~ representing the regions for the West Swale and Afforestation areas. Members of the Legislative Assembly. casaskatoonfairview@shaw.ca

His Worship Mayor Charlie Clark

Saskatoon City Councillors. Ward 2 – Councillor Hilary Gough and Ward 3 – Councillor Ann Iwanchuk

Shaping Saskatoon Email communications Division

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. In doing so, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Adopt a rancher. Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan

‘Beginning to hit a wall:’ MVA concerned over provincial funding cuts Meewasin Valley News CKOM

Crown Land Ecological Assessment Tool CLEAT is a computer program which puts a price tag on nature which weighs the cost of the Northern Leopard Frog against potential oil and gas development, and agricultural capability, and economic growth. What is the price tag which the Saskatchewan Party places on the last Monarch Butterfly or Baird’s Sparrow? That is what I would like to know. Has the Saskatchewan Party hereby in essence revoked the Monarch Butterfly’s passport entitling them to travel under government protection to and from foreign countries during their migration time?

“Almost everywhere in the world man has been disregarding the Divine Law and the Laws of Nature, to his own undoing. In his pride, he has rampaged over the stage of the earth, forgetting that he is only one of the players put there to play his part in harmony and oneness with all living things.~Richard St. Barbe Baker”

Meewasin Green Circle

Meewasin Valley Authority concerned after premier’s comments about cuts Feb 7, 2017.

New funding to help Saskatchewan ranchers protect species at risk. Environment and Climate Change Canada has given $2.58 million to the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association to lead a conservation project designed to help species at risk. Canadian Geographic.

Pasture land consultation. Have your say. Participate in the Process. Government of Saskatchewan.

Saskatchewan Ranchers Recognized for their Conservation Commitment. Sept 9 2016

Shield, David.Meewasin Valley Authority losing nearly half its provincial funding “very challenging,” says Saskatoon Mayor. Authority and city had feared bigger cuts or end of provincial funding. CBC News. Mar 22, 2017

Southern Conservation Land Management Strategy Government of Saskatchewan.

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Is this the fate of the Saskatchewan River Valley, the marshlands, the temperate grasslands, the river bank? Without the MVA and their annual spring clean up, what will the water supply look like if this tragedy is allowed to take place? Is this what a river city should become?  Please help prevent this devastation.

If you wouldn’t mind, please do check out the Meewasin Green Circle.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

It is not a farce.…”To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.” ~Terry Tempest Williams

 

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The fate of the MVA Interpretive Centre

Man is not alone in the universe ~ I suppose we all work for the MVA because we believe in the cause.

“Meewasin Interpretive Centre closure ‘sad day’ wrote Brandon Hrder in the Saskatoon Star Phoenix, Thusday June 9, 2016. The MVA formed in 1979, using a small office on campus before the Meewasin Centre opened Monday February 15, 1988 reported Julie Fleming Juarez in the Saskatoon Mirror. February 15, is Canada’s National Heritage Day, quite fitting for the Interpretive Centre grand opening, which has a focus on Saskatoon’s history, promoting education, understanding and awareness of the South Saskatchewan River Valley, and its heritage and natural resources.

Located at 402-Third Avenue, the centre is on the eastern perimeter of Saskatoon’s River Landing. As part of the heritage of Saskatoon the Meewasin Valley Authority Centre had been situated at the foot of the Broadway bridge and Traffic Bridge.

A bit of history reveals that the Victoria Bride or “Traffic Bridge was a truss bridge that spanned South Saskatchewan River, connecting Victoria Avenue to 3rd Avenue South and Spadina Crescent in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Opened October 10, 1907, it was the first vehicle bridge in Saskatoon, replacing an unreliable ferry service. The promised construction of the bridge was considered a prime factor in the amalgamation of the towns of Saskatoon, Nutana and Riversdale. The Traffic Bridge was the only road bridge in Saskatoon until 1916, when the University Bridge was completed.In 2010, the bridge was permanently closed due to severe corrosion and has been partially demolished.”~Wikipedia

The four MVA galleries showcase Saskatoon’s character, the city’s economic history, the impact of being city located astride the South Saskatchewan River, the the people who chose to live here. Heritage photos of Saskatoon and a large map grace the walls alongside video displays.

The interpretive centre co-exits with the Meewasin administration offices. “One of our functions is to tell people about the history of Saskatoon,” explained Brenda Janzen one of the MVA’s interpreters of 1989, “Another function is to tell people about the Meewasin Valley – how they can enjoy the trail and the various parks located in the city.” The MVA centre liaisons with community groups, the Saskatoon Heritage Society and Geological Society in setting up changing displays. Bird Watching Workshops, self-guided tour packages and hosted hiking tours have been special MVA feature presentations.

The MVA created in 1979 focuses on the health of the river valley and the protection of its natural eco-system. The MVA, to this end they organize the annual spring clean ups of the river banks, and parks. Youth groups, Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, Community Associations, church affiliations, corporations, students, and volunteers all come out to take part in cleaning up the city and area. These conservation efforts protect the city’s water supply as trash has an adverse effect upon water quality contamination and poses threats to drinking water and wildlife. The Meewasin founded the Partners for the Saskatchewan River Basin PFSRB in 1993 which undertakes river management practices.

MVA architect Raymond Moriyama received the Canadian Architect Yearbook’s 1979 Award of Excellence for the MVA 100 year plan, reported the Saskatoon Star Phoenix February 9, 1980. Moriyama’s vision and concepts included recreational facilities, winter gardens, a wharf area, glassed in pedestrian corridors, a new City Hall, new shopping centre, experimental housing on the University of Saskatchewan campus, and walking and interpretive centres slung low beneath the bridges.

On February 25, 1984, it was found in the Saskatoon StarPhoenix, that the MVA were themselves recipients of Canada’s Governor General’s Conservation Award.
October 19, 1980 the MVA wins the international award, setting Saskatoon on the world stage. Again February 16, 1993 the MVA wins a National Award and attends an acceptance ceremony in Manitoba.

The first projects of the MVA were the Bessborough Skating Rink and the Meewasin Park setting the stage for river bank planning and public engagement with nature in the city. The MVA spear-headed projects to remove a contaminated site where “Agent Orange” had been buried, and managed to restore the site to a naturalized area. The Meewasin, City of Saskatoon and Ducks Unlimited along with corporate sponsors and environmental groups worked together to facilitate wetlands habitats in storm water ponds. The City of Saskatoon treats sewage with secondary and tertiary treatment practices, and discontinued the flow of alum and iron into the river as awareness of the river grew. Meewasin undertakes a huge planting of native flora, and trees. To encourage native species, such as crocus and others, controlled burns are implemented as part of the naturalized eco-system management. The care and stewardship of the river now, will make the wetlands, the waterway and the river valley ecologically sustainable for many generations to come.

The MVA, does indeed have a profound effect upon the current generation who can appreciate the riverside and park trails, learn about Saskatoon’s history at the interpretive centre, respect and live in harmony with nature well into the future.  The MVA brings together public programs and projects to conserve and enhance the natural resources along the South Saskatchewan River, and the waters which drain in to the river.

The interpretive centre gets between 15,000 to 20,000 visitors annually, and serving close to 1/2 million visitors since 1988. It is during the summer months, the beginning of the tourist season when the MVA interpretive centre is appreciated by visitors from around the world. What will it take to keep the interpretive centre functioning for school classes of children and for tourists to appreciate the unique history of Saskatoon, and to learn about the MVA river bank trails, and parkway system?

The current location used by the MVA is 16,200 square feet, in a former Rothman’s tobacco warehouse originally constructed in 1972, and was bought by the MVA in 1986. This building is located in Friendship Park right along the river bank. The interpretive centre features four galleries open to the public.

As Saskatoon grows to 1/2 million by 2023 what do the citizens want for their city? What should the City of Saskatoon look like in these short seven years from now? Do the citizens appreciate having the parks, the several afforestation areas, the walkways in the city of Saskatoon? How can the residents of the city of Saskatoon and area let the MVA know their appreciation of programs at the Beaver Creek Conservation Area, of accessible trails, of the naturalized restoration and reclamation work undertaken at Cranberry Flats Conservation area, of the creation and upkeep of MVA’s river bank trails and park connector routes. Even planting Monarch Butterfly gardens to save the declining population of Monarch Butterflies has been an MVA initiative.

As there are a greater number of residents with an urban background they have less opportunity to appreciate the natural prairie grasslands, forests and wetlands. It is due to the efforts of the City of Saskatoon working in conjunction with the MVA, that the residents are, indeed, able to appreciate the many naturalized parks in and around Saskatoon, the native wildlife prairie habitats, the afforested areas which become homes to white-tail deer, rabbit, mule deer, mountain bluebird, black-capped chickadee. Not only activities limited to parks and educational programs, but the MVA is also actively preserving and protecting the North East Swale, and the West Swale wetlands and surrounding areas.

The fate of the MVA Interpretive Centre rests in your hands, Saskatoon.

If a package of cigarettes costs $15.00 for 25, and it is always easy to find money for cigarettes, why not make a monthly deposit for a year to the MVA of $15.00 so that the funding and staffing of the Interpretive Center in Saskatoon and at Beaver Creek can be sustained.

If a family four can dine for about $24.99 at many fast food chains, why not make a monthly deposit for a year to the MVA of $25.00 if you enjoy the parks and trails of Saskatoon.

If a family of four has a delightful time taking in a movie, and spending a sum of $40.00 to enter, and another $26.00 on snacks, why not make a monthly deposit to the MVA of $66.00 for a year as an appreciation of the entertainment your family spends in the city’s river bank parks, at Beaver Creek and Cranberry Flats Conservation Areas.

Saskatoon’s population in 2011 was 222,189, and of that population 170,144 were over the age of 19. If only half of this adult population would donate $20.00 a month for an entire year, an amazing trust fund could be started to support the conservation efforts of this environmental working to sustain the South Saskatchewan River valley now and for future generations. Pop over to the Meewasin Valley Authority website to make a donation and get involved!!!.  Talk to the corporation you work for as well, ask if they would  also love to support the MVA.

If you think it is wonderful to live in a city astride an amazing river, walk along the river bank, and take in the sights of the river valley, it would, indeed, be a splendid idea to send a little thank you to the MVA to continue their environmental conservancy work for the South Saskatchewan River wetlands.

A volunteer for the MVA, Derek Hill stated, “I suppose we all work for the MVA because we believe in the cause.” (Saskatoon Star Phoenix. September 2, 1988)

If you think that classes of children, tourists worldwide, and your family enjoy the self-guided tours available at the MVA, and the galleries showcasing Saskatoon’s history at the Meewasin Valley Interpretive Centre, justsend them a thank you and let them know how important the Meewasin Valley Authority and their several environmental programs and ecologically sustainable initiatives along the South Saskatchewan River Valley are to you.

“We are all the guardians of this precious resource of Meewasin.” (Meewsin Explorer. Vol 21 #5 November December 2014.)

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Armstrong, Jeannie. Discover City Magic at Meewasin Centre. S-P Creative Services. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. May 13, 1989.

Boklaschuk, Shannon. MVA: Funding frozen since 1986, board chair says. The StarPhoenix. April 11, 2006

French, Janet. Trails, butterflies on MVA’s radar. The StarPhoenix. Aparil 7, 2002
Harder, Brandon. Meewasin Interpretive Centre Closure ‘sad day’. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. Thursday June 9, 2016.

Fuller, Cam. MVA centre rich in city’s lore. Saskatoon StarPhoenix. February 20, 1988.

Hanley, Paul. Meewasin Helps Saskatoon shine internationally. The StarPhoenix. December 5, 2006.

Juarez, Julie Fleming. Meewasin Centre to be opened on Monday. The Saskatoon Mirror. February 10, 1988.

Planner calls for lake, drive with view of river. MVAs goals spell green. The StarPhoenix. September 7, 1991

Statistics Canada Saskatoon Census Profile 2011 Government of Canada. 2016-05-02

Tank, Phil. Urgent Needs put MVA in ‘precious position’. Saskatoon StarPhoenix January 4, 2016

The fate of an individual or a nation will always be determined by the degree of his or its harmony with the forces and laws of Nature and the universe. Man is not alone in the universe but is surrounded by sources of power, harmony and knowledge. The fullness of life depends upon man’s harmony with the totality of the natural cosmic laws. Our individual evolution is a job that has to be carried on day by day by each individual himself. It is a livelong task.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should go towards  the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

July 9, 2016 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area CLEAN UP Day PAMPHLET