St Barbe

Additional information has been uncovered regarding, “St. Barbe” and whether it should be part of the surname, or used as a middle name.

Lt. Dr. Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker, OBE, ACF, MC, LL.D, F.A.I.L., For. Dip. Cantab.

Commonly he is known as Richard St Barbe Baker, earth healer and conservationist, or affectionately referred to as “St Barbe” by his friends.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

 

The “e” in Barbe is silent as confirmed by the West End Local History Society, where Richard St. Barbe Baker grew up in the country house, “The Firs” on Beacon Road, West End, Hampshire, England.

“Many wonderful days filled Richard St. Barbe Baker’s long life. As an adult he was affectionately called by his middle[sic] name, St. Barbe ~ a French surname that had been in his family for generations. His admirers considered him a ‘saint’ because he whole-heartedly devoted himself to helping the planet. He called himself a conservationist and an “Earth Healer. (Malnor. 2009) ”

Richard St. Barbe Baker was the eldest living child born to Reverend John Thomas Wright Baker and Charlotte Purrott. Baker and Purrott were married in 1886, and it was around this time that John Baker added the St. Barbe family name to his surname. In total, John and Charlotte had six children all christened with the addition of St Barbe in the surname ‘St Barbe Baker’  in honour of a branch of the family connected with the St Barbe’s of Romsey [Westender May June 2017. Volume 10 Number 11].

Arms of St Barbe of Ashington, Somerset and Broadlands, Hampshire and St Barbe baronets: ''Chequy argent and sable'' Modified from commons File:Blason Palamède.svg by User:Chatsam Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Arms of St Barbe of Ashington, Somerset and Broadlands, Hampshire and St Barbe baronets: ”Chequy argent and sable” Wikimedia Commons  3.0

What is known of the St. Barbe family of Romsey and the English country house, Broadlands?

Broadlands English country house, Romsey,Test Valley district of Hampshire, England.
Broadlands English country house, Romsey, Test Valley district of Hampshire, England.

“After the Dissolution of the Monasteries, Broadlands was sold to Sir Francis Fleming in 1547. His granddaughter married Edward St. Barbe, and the manor remained the property of the St. Barbe family for the next 117 years. Sir John St Barbe, 1st Baronet (c. 1655–1723) made many improvements to the manor but died without progeny having bequeathed it to his cousin Humphrey Sydenham of Combe, Dulverton. In the chancel of Ashington Church, Somerset, is a monument of grey and white marble, inscribed:

Here lies Sir John St. Barbe, Bart. possessed of those amiable qualities, which birth, education, travel, greatness of spirit, and goodness of heart, produce. Interred in the same vault lies his second wife Alice Fiennes, aunt to the present Lord Say and Sele. His first was Honour, daughter of Colonel Norton. He died at his seat of Broadlands in Hampshire Sept. 7, 1723, leaving for his only heir and executor Humphrey Sydenham, esq., of Combe in Somersetshire, who ordered this marble to his memory.{Source}”

Furthermore, “The St Barbe Family originated from Normandy. One of its chiefs was an officer in the Army of William the Conqueror. His name is on the Roll of Battle Abbey and he is supposed to have been the Founder of the Family in England.{Source}

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1066 and all that… Gregorie.org.

Broadlands, Romsey

Burke, John and Bernard. St. Barbe of Broadlands. A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England
Publisher Scott, Webster & Geary, 1841

Cave, Edwards and John Nichols. Obituary. Charles St. Barbe, Esq. F.S.A. The Gentleman’s Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year …, Volume 186

Parker J.H. and J.   Descent of the St. Barbe Family.The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review, Volume 209  1860

Legal documents relating to property on the Broadlands estate.

Malnor, Bruce and Carol. Earth Heroes: Champions of the Wilderness. Volume 1 of Earth Heroes Series. Illustrated by Anisa Claire Hovemann. Publisher Dawn Publications. ISBN 158469467X, 9781584694670. 2009.

St. Barbe, Sir John, 1st Bt. [c1655-17230, of Broadlands, Hants. History of Parliament: the HOuse of Commons 1660-1690, ed. B.D. Henning, 1983

Westender July – August 2014 Volume 9 Number 6West End Local History Society

Westender January and February 2017 Volume 10, Number 9 West End Local History Society

Westender May June 2017. Volume 10 Number 11. West End Local History Society.

Westender September and October 2006 Volume 5 Number 7West End Local History Society.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

St. Barbe ~ the family name

Those who knew Richard St. Barbe Baker, said that he was known as “St. Barbe” to his friends.

In discussing the legacy of Richard, St. Barbe Baker, founder of the two international movements, “Men of the Trees”, and “Children of the Green Earth”, a question often arises; “Is St. Barbe part of the surname?”

Baker port001 copy
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker
Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan,
University Archives & Special Collections,
Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

On delving into the family tree of Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker [St. Barbe], it has been discovered that St. Barbe (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) was born to John Richard St. Barbe Baker and Charlotte Purrott in West End, Hampshire, United Kingdom. According to a genealogical researcher St Barbe’s mother was born between July 1859 and September 1859, in Croydon RD, Surrey, England. John Richard St. Barbe Baker, St. Barbe’s father, had a birth date between 1829-1889 and died January 1, 1944. St. Barbe had three younger siblings, James Scott Baker (b. about 1892), Ethele M. (b. about 1894), Thomas Guillaume St. Barbe Baker (1895-1966),

The 1901 census at The Firs, West End lists the St. B. Baker family as;
John R. St. B. Baker Head, Married, 40,m Living on own means Evangelist and Tree Grower, West End.
Charlotte S. Do [Ditto] Wife, Married 40 Surrey Croydon.
Richard E Do. Son 11 Hants. West End.
James S Do. Son. 9 Do Do
Ethele M Do Dau. 7 Do.Do.
Thomas G. Do. Son 5 Do. Do

At the age of 57, Richard St. Barbe Baker married Doreen Whitworth Long of Strensham, Worcestershire, United Kingdom, on January 23, 1946. Doreen and St. Barbe had two children, Paul (b. 1949) and Angela (b. 1946). This marriage ended in divorce seven years later.

On October 7, 1959, now aged 70, Richard St. Barbe Baker, married Catriona Burnett, and took up residence in New Zealand. In 1969, St. Barbe sought to trace his wife’s Scottish ancestry during a Scotland lecture tour.

So this research uncovers the fact that Dr. Richard St. Barbe Baker L.L.D 1971, O.B.E.1977 – whom the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is named after – bore a surname of “St. Barbe Baker”, as his dad, John Richard St. Barbe Baker, also has been registered as having the St. Barbe Baker surname. To further delve into the query, a genealogist of the St. Barbe Baker family lineage has been contacted to see if there are any further clues as to how “St. Barbe” came to be part of the family surname, if known. The reply has come back, that this is unknown at this time.

Those who knew Richard St. Barbe Baker, said that he was known as “St. Barbe” to his friends. If anyone has any further information about this, please email StBarbeBaker AT yahoo.com Thank you kindly.

“And when I die may my body be laid to rest at the roots of a tall tree so that my spirit may arise in the branches and give thanks”

Bibliography:
Baker, Richard Edward St. Barbe
(1889–1982)
Bahai Encylopedia Project. 2012 National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of the United States. Date accessed May 30, 2016.

Capt Thomas Guillaume St. Barbe Baker M.C.
Richard St. Barbe Baker wikipedia.Date accessed May 30, 2016.

Charlotte Sophie St. Barbe Baker (Purrott (Porret)) deceased – Genealogy Genie. Managed by Randy Schoenberg. Date Accessed May 30, 2016.

Forestry man tracing his family tree. The Glasgow Herald. September 3, 1969. Digitized online by Google Newspaper Archives. Date accessed May 30, 2016.

John Richard St. Barbe Baker (b-1944) – Genealolgy Genie.com. Date accessed May 30, 2016.
Miller, Ruth Wright. Saskatchewan Heroes and Rogues Digitized online by Google Books. Date accessed May 30, 2016.
Richard Baker My Heritage.

Richard St. Baker Twitter feed out of Sydney, Australia on twitter Date accessed May 30, 2016.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

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