Just walk and see

The pleasure of going for a walk in a comfortable sweater, knowing it will keep you warm every time, is enough to be happy.  Just walk, and see, walk beyond where you have been before.  Explore new sights and sounds.  There is a whole world out there waiting as you find a new route.  Don’t go anywhere, don’t anticipate the destination, just follow your feet.  For as Friedrich Nietzsche says, “all truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.”

National Sweater Day has traditionally fallen on the first Thursday of February, which in 2018 falls on February 1

 


Host an event for National Sweater Day to help WWF-Canada {WWF-World Wide Fund For Nature (also known as World Wildlife Fund) } protect wildlife and habitats in Canada and beyond.

Locally steps have been taken to protect the wildlife corridor in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area by city council in 1972.

“He could tell by the way animals walked that they were keeping time to some kind of music. Maybe it was the song in their own hearts that they walked to.” Laura Adams Armer

Today due to the rather chilly weather, it may be hard to walk in only sweater without further layers, and it may also be challenging to hear birds sing as they snuggle down awaiting the cold snap to pass ~ a method employed to conserve energy.  However here is a beautiful ode by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!

Bird thou never wert,
That from Heaven, or near it,
Pourest thy full heart
In profuse strains of unpremeditated art.
Higher still and higher
From the earth thou springest
Like a cloud of fire;
The blue deep thou wingest,
And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“If you seek creative ideas go walking.
Angels whisper to a man when he goes for
a walk.” Raymond I. Myers.

 

.

Richard St. Barbe Baker | Landscapes Paysages

“During my time in Saskatchewan,
I felt closer than ever to this
extraordinary man.”

Camilla Allen. The Man of the Trees. Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71
Photo of Richard St. Barbe Baker Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, Richard St. Barbe Baker fonds, MG 71

In the Canadian Association of Landscape Architects periodical “Landscapes Paysages” invention, vol 19, no 4 is found the article written by the University of Sheffield student, Camilla Allen about Richard St. Barbe Baker.  As Allen states, “During my time in Saskatchewan, I felt closer than ever to this extraordinary man” and she expounds upon Baker’s devotion to his work, to trees around the world.

 

 

During Allen’s visit to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, she had the opportunity to visit the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the Richard St. Barbe Baker homestead site near Beaver Creek. Allen spent time at the Meewasin Valley Authority Centre perusing the interpretive centre display, and delved into the Richard St. Barbe Baker Fonds at the University of Saskatchewan Library Special Collections and Archives. Allen had the good fortune of meeting both Paul Hanley, best selling author of “Eleven” and former Environmental Columnist for the Saskatoon Star Phoenix and Robert White,  both of whom knew Richard St. Barbe Baker  personally and knew him as St Barbe.

Wishing Allen the best of success with her thesis, the subject of which is Richard St. Barbe Baker, founder of the International Tree Foundation in the year 1924

A man, to succeed, must possess the necessary equanimity of temperament to conceive an idea, the capacity to form it into some tangible shape, the ingenuity to put it into practical operation, the ability to favorably impress others with its merits, and the power of will that is absolutely necessary to force it to success.Thomas A. Scott

Thank you to Verity Moore-Wright from the Meewasin Valley Authority in regards to notification about this article appearing in the periodical “Landscapes Paysages”

we wait for the sunrise of our awakening to the realisation of our kinship with the earth and all living things.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven. And learn tranquility.
” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Act. Don’t react. See a need, fix it first. Worry about the details later. If you wait until you are asked you have just missed a golden opportunity. They are fleeting and rare.” Philip Wollen founder of Winsome Kindness Trust

“Biography is the literature of realized personality, of life as it has been lived, of actual achievements or shortcomings, of success or failure; it is not imaginary and embellished, not what might be or might have been, not reduced to prescribed or artificial forms, but it is the unvarnished story of that which was delightful, disappointing, possible, or impossible, in a life spent in this world. ” ~James Boswell

Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

City council meeting.

Monday August 28. 2017

A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.
Franklin D. Roosevelt

There is a city council follow up meeting  to the Standing Policy Committee on Planning, Development and Community Services meeting of Monday August 4.  The City of Saskatoon meeting will be Monday August 28, 2017.  The agenda will be to continue discussion regarding the Inquiry from former Councillor Lorje (April 25, 2016) – Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area [File No. CK. 4000-1 and PL. 4131-39-1 (BF 016-16)]

We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.

Max de Pree

The Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area will be considered by City Council at its Regular Business meeting to commence at 1:00 p.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017. The public may attend this meeting of City Council and, if you wish to bring forward any points relevant to the discussion write a letter providing additional information, and/or requesting to speak at the Council meeting.

Drop off a letter addressed to His Worship the Mayor and Members of City Council.  c/o City Clerk’s Office, City Hall. City of Saskatoon | 222 3rd Avenue North | Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5 by 10:00 a.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017; or submit your intent to speak for up to five minutes by the online form.

For more information on the meeting, the agenda or how to Write a Letter check the City of Saskatoon’s website prior to Monday, August 28, 2017

By eating meat we share the responsibility of climate change, the destruction of our forests, and the poisoning of our air and water. The simple act of becoming a vegetarian will make a difference in the health of our planet.

Thich Nhat Hanh

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees. As far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Act. Don’t react. See a need, fix it first. Worry about the details later. If you wait until you are asked you have just missed a golden opportunity. They are fleeting and rare.” Philip Wollen founder of Winsome Kindness Trust

 

Family Forest Adventures!

 

 

Parent’s Day – fourth Sunday in July 23, 2017
Family adventures to discover the forest!

Discover the Forest Start your own adventure!
Family Activities in Nature
Forest Theme and Activities
Walking in the Forest

What activity can your family find to do on Parent’s day?

Parenthood

The birches that dance on the top of the hill
Are so slender and young that they cannot keep still,
They bend and they nod at each whiff of a breeze,
For you see they are still just the children of trees.

But the birches below in the valley are older,
They are calmer and straighter and taller and colder.
Perhaps when we’ve grown up as solemn and grave,
We, too, will have children who do not behave!
~John Farrar

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“To find the universal elements enough; to find the air and the water exhilarating; to be refreshed by a morning walk or an evening saunter… to be thrilled by the stars at night; to be elated over a bird’s nest or a wildflower in spring — these are some of the rewards of the simple life.”
― John Burroughs


See how nature – trees, flowers, grass – grows in silence; see the stars, the moon and the sun, how they move in silence . . . We need silence to be able to touch souls.
~Mother Teresa

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Protecting your pet

By nature man is a
forest dweller.

National Pet Day April 11

 

“Why does watching a dog be a dog fill one with happiness?”
—Jonathan Safran Foer

From Our Hearts
With Our Hands
For The Earth
All The World Together
~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Among domestic animals, parasitic diseases are very common. Lice, mites, ticks, flies, and round and flat worms are examples of insects and worms living at the host’s expense which may cause parasitic disease. Most commonly parasites inhabit the digestive tract and skin, however they may invade any bodily organs. In the case of mosquitoes, flies and ticks, it is the transfer of microorganisms to healthy individuals via the punctures or the bites as they travel from one species to another.

When entering in to the natural environment of the woodlands with your pet, it is best to be informed.  Ticks like to stand in tall grass or sit upon plants in wooded areas waiting for a chance to cling to hosts. “On dogs, ticks often attach themselves in crevices and/or areas with little to no hair, typically in and around the ears, the areas where the insides of the legs meet the body, between the toes, and within skin folds.Ticks” For humans, a tick will mainly travel upward to the hairline. When a suitable site on the host is found, the tick digs it mouthparts into the skin and starts its blood meal. This meal may last just a few hours, or several days.

” Pesticide product that kills ticks is known as an acaricide. Acaricides that can be used on dogs include dusts, impregnated collars, sprays, or topical treatments. Some acaricides kill the tick on contact. Others may be absorbed into the bloodstream of a dog and kill ticks that attach and feed.Preventing

“Watch your pet for symptoms of tick-borne diseases. Some symptoms include arthritis or lameness that lasts for three to four days, reluctance to move, swollen joints, fever, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, loss of appetite and neurological problems.Getting” These symptoms may not appear immediately, but may manifest 7-21 days or longer following a tick bite.

Fine-tipped, precision tweezers work the best to remove ticks as you can focus their tips on the mouth part of the tick, without squeezing the tick body.

“Grasp the tick as close to the skin of the host … pull upwards with steady, even pressure. Do not twist or jerk the tick as this may leave its mouth parts embedded, or cause it to regurgitate disease-causing fluids. If any mouth parts do break off, they may be removed with a sterilised needle or tweezer points…. Do not squeeze or crush the body of the tick, because its fluids (saliva and gut contents) may contain disease-causing organisms and leak into the host’s bloodstream or in to the skin.Tick

For your pet, fill up a child’s wading pool in your yard when the weather is warmer. Then go for a walk with your dog. When you arrive back home, the sun will have warmed the chilly water from the hose. It will be easier to pop your dog into the warmer water of the wading pool outdoors, and this quick bath may rid your pet of any ticks your eyes have missed. The slicking down of the fur in the water may also help to reveal the missed ticks, thus protecting your dog from illness.

Keep the surroundings where your pet lives as tick free as possible. Using diatomaceous earth is a frequently used method to rid the dog’s bedding and yard area of ticks.

Educate yourself and unravel the best practices to protect your pet on National Pet Day, April 11.

“Dogs don’t rationalize. They don’t hold anything against a person. They don’t see the outside of a human but the inside of a human.”
—Cesar Millan

“A forest is a perfect example of the law of return in action. Trees give back to the earth more then they take, while building up humus, and enriching the soil by the minerals that have been carried up to the leaves in the rising sap. By nature man is a
forest dweller. He was cradled in the tropics. His food was the fruit of the trees. He possessed the secret of adaptation to his environment, so that health, gentleness, beauty and strength were enjoyed to the full. In his forest setting man was conscious
of his relationship to God and of his unity with all living things. ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

BILBIOGRAPHY
Getting Ticks off Dogs Humane Society.

Preventing Ticks on Dogs Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Tick Removal Fine Tipped Tweezers. BADA Borreliosis and Associated Diseases Awareness UK

Ticks on Dogs.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

It is not a farce.…”To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.” ~Terry Tempest Williams

 

Do one thing!

“When I hear of the destruction of a species, I feel just as if all the works of some great writer have perished.”~~ Theodore Roosevelt

Do one thing!

United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020

 

“Come forth into the light of things,
Let Nature be your Teacher.”
~~Wordsworth

What is educating yourself in biodiversity good for? To ruminate on such knowledge fosters the power of careful observation and clear expression. Is it only to find the name and order of a plant, but its structure, its habits, its life in short, as untouched by mankind? Know now that Nature, herself, is the best text-book. What can be told upon observation of the most obvious things seen locally, the things which can be seen and handled, and experimented upon naturally, without artificial aids?  This is to develop the inherent pleasure in the the recognition of the things seen day to day ~ on a first name basis.

What else there is there in the world besides plants? Are there not three kingdoms, animal, vegetable, and mineral? Within these kingdoms are classifications; organic and inorganic. An organ (Εργον, meaning work) is any part that does a special work, as the leaves, the stem of a plant, and the eye, the ear of animals. An organism is a living being made up of such organs. The inorganic world contains the mineral kingdom; the organic world includes the vegetable and animal kingdoms.

That being said, there is no real division between animals and plants. Perhaps it is easy to say that plants are fixed to one place, while animals can move about; that plants have no will or consciousness, and that animals have. These answers are true when we compare the higher animals with plants, but the differences become lost as we descend in the scale and approach the border land where botanist and zoologist meet on a common ground. Sea-anemones are fixed to the rock on which they grow, while some of the lower plants are able to move from place to place, and it is hardly safe to affirm that a jelly-fish is more conscious of its actions than is a Sensitive Plant, the leaves of which close when the stem is touched.

Life alone brings forth life, and we are as far as ever from understanding its nature. Around our little island of knowledge, built up through the centuries by the labor of countless workers, stretches the infinite ocean of the unknown.
Are you on a first name basis with nature?  Being on a first name basis means knowing them very well; being good friends….

For this great friend of mankind, for your friend Mother Nature, for the afforestation area ~ do one thing! Do one thing today! What is it you wish to do to preserve biodiversity? (click here for suggestions)

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“I became intoxicated with the beauty all around me, immersed in the joyousness and exultation of feeling part of it all….I had entered the temple of the woods.~~ “Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“When I hear of the destruction of a species, I feel just as if all the works of some great writer have perished.”~~ Theodore Roosevelt

Each species on our planet plays a role in the healthy functioning of natural ecosystems, on which humans depend.~~ William H. Schlesinger

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

 

I believe in oneness of mankind and of all living things and in the interdependence of each and all. I believe that unless we play fair to the Earth, we cannot exist physically on this planet. Unless we play fair to our neighbour, we cannot exist socially or internationally. Unless we play fair to better self, there is no individuality and no leadership. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

“Kind people have been expressing superlatives on my work. But I can assure you that anything which I have been able to achieve has been team work. We have a motto in the Men of the Trees. TWAHAMWE. It is an African word meaning ‘pull together’ and I pass this on to all those concerned with conservation in this country. I would like to call you to silence for a moment with the words of Mathew Arnold:

“Calm soul of all things, make it mine,
To feel amidst the City ‘s jar
That there abides a peace of thine
Men did not make and cannot mar. ”
~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Soon the bracken became shorter

 

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

There is only one real reason to keep bees, and that is because they are fascinating. If you just want honey, make friends with a beekeeper.
-Australia beekeeper, Adrian the Bee Man

 

The fate of the MVA Interpretive Centre

Man is not alone in the universe ~ I suppose we all work for the MVA because we believe in the cause.

“Meewasin Interpretive Centre closure ‘sad day’ wrote Brandon Hrder in the Saskatoon Star Phoenix, Thusday June 9, 2016. The MVA formed in 1979, using a small office on campus before the Meewasin Centre opened Monday February 15, 1988 reported Julie Fleming Juarez in the Saskatoon Mirror. February 15, is Canada’s National Heritage Day, quite fitting for the Interpretive Centre grand opening, which has a focus on Saskatoon’s history, promoting education, understanding and awareness of the South Saskatchewan River Valley, and its heritage and natural resources.

Located at 402-Third Avenue, the centre is on the eastern perimeter of Saskatoon’s River Landing. As part of the heritage of Saskatoon the Meewasin Valley Authority Centre had been situated at the foot of the Broadway bridge and Traffic Bridge.

A bit of history reveals that the Victoria Bride or “Traffic Bridge was a truss bridge that spanned South Saskatchewan River, connecting Victoria Avenue to 3rd Avenue South and Spadina Crescent in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Opened October 10, 1907, it was the first vehicle bridge in Saskatoon, replacing an unreliable ferry service. The promised construction of the bridge was considered a prime factor in the amalgamation of the towns of Saskatoon, Nutana and Riversdale. The Traffic Bridge was the only road bridge in Saskatoon until 1916, when the University Bridge was completed.In 2010, the bridge was permanently closed due to severe corrosion and has been partially demolished.”~Wikipedia

The four MVA galleries showcase Saskatoon’s character, the city’s economic history, the impact of being city located astride the South Saskatchewan River, the the people who chose to live here. Heritage photos of Saskatoon and a large map grace the walls alongside video displays.

The interpretive centre co-exits with the Meewasin administration offices. “One of our functions is to tell people about the history of Saskatoon,” explained Brenda Janzen one of the MVA’s interpreters of 1989, “Another function is to tell people about the Meewasin Valley – how they can enjoy the trail and the various parks located in the city.” The MVA centre liaisons with community groups, the Saskatoon Heritage Society and Geological Society in setting up changing displays. Bird Watching Workshops, self-guided tour packages and hosted hiking tours have been special MVA feature presentations.

The MVA created in 1979 focuses on the health of the river valley and the protection of its natural eco-system. The MVA, to this end they organize the annual spring clean ups of the river banks, and parks. Youth groups, Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, Community Associations, church affiliations, corporations, students, and volunteers all come out to take part in cleaning up the city and area. These conservation efforts protect the city’s water supply as trash has an adverse effect upon water quality contamination and poses threats to drinking water and wildlife. The Meewasin founded the Partners for the Saskatchewan River Basin PFSRB in 1993 which undertakes river management practices.

MVA architect Raymond Moriyama received the Canadian Architect Yearbook’s 1979 Award of Excellence for the MVA 100 year plan, reported the Saskatoon Star Phoenix February 9, 1980. Moriyama’s vision and concepts included recreational facilities, winter gardens, a wharf area, glassed in pedestrian corridors, a new City Hall, new shopping centre, experimental housing on the University of Saskatchewan campus, and walking and interpretive centres slung low beneath the bridges.

On February 25, 1984, it was found in the Saskatoon StarPhoenix, that the MVA were themselves recipients of Canada’s Governor General’s Conservation Award.
October 19, 1980 the MVA wins the international award, setting Saskatoon on the world stage. Again February 16, 1993 the MVA wins a National Award and attends an acceptance ceremony in Manitoba.

The first projects of the MVA were the Bessborough Skating Rink and the Meewasin Park setting the stage for river bank planning and public engagement with nature in the city. The MVA spear-headed projects to remove a contaminated site where “Agent Orange” had been buried, and managed to restore the site to a naturalized area. The Meewasin, City of Saskatoon and Ducks Unlimited along with corporate sponsors and environmental groups worked together to facilitate wetlands habitats in storm water ponds. The City of Saskatoon treats sewage with secondary and tertiary treatment practices, and discontinued the flow of alum and iron into the river as awareness of the river grew. Meewasin undertakes a huge planting of native flora, and trees. To encourage native species, such as crocus and others, controlled burns are implemented as part of the naturalized eco-system management. The care and stewardship of the river now, will make the wetlands, the waterway and the river valley ecologically sustainable for many generations to come.

The MVA, does indeed have a profound effect upon the current generation who can appreciate the riverside and park trails, learn about Saskatoon’s history at the interpretive centre, respect and live in harmony with nature well into the future.  The MVA brings together public programs and projects to conserve and enhance the natural resources along the South Saskatchewan River, and the waters which drain in to the river.

 

The interpretive centre gets between 15,000 to 20,000 visitors annually, and serving close to 1/2 million visitors since 1988. It is during the summer months, the beginning of the tourist season when the MVA interpretive centre is appreciated by visitors from around the world. What will it take to keep the interpretive centre functioning for school classes of children and for tourists to appreciate the unique history of Saskatoon, and to learn about the MVA river bank trails, and parkway system?

The current location used by the MVA is 16,200 square feet, in a former Rothman’s tobacco warehouse originally constructed in 1972, and was bought by the MVA in 1986. This building is located in Friendship Park right along the river bank. The interpretive centre features four galleries open to the public.

As Saskatoon grows to 1/2 million by 2023 what do the citizens want for their city? What should the City of Saskatoon look like in these short seven years from now? Do the citizens appreciate having the parks, the several afforestation areas, the walkways in the city of Saskatoon? How can the residents of the city of Saskatoon and area let the MVA know their appreciation of programs at the Beaver Creek Conservation Area, of accessible trails, of the naturalized restoration and reclamation work undertaken at Cranberry Flats Conservation area, of the creation and upkeep of MVA’s river bank trails and park connector routes. Even planting Monarch Butterfly gardens to save the declining population of Monarch Butterflies has been an MVA initiative.

As there are a greater number of residents with an urban background they have less opportunity to appreciate the natural prairie grasslands, forests and wetlands. It is due to the efforts of the City of Saskatoon working in conjunction with the MVA, that the residents are, indeed, able to appreciate the many naturalized parks in and around Saskatoon, the native wildlife prairie habitats, the afforested areas which become homes to white-tail deer, rabbit, mule deer, mountain bluebird, black-capped chickadee. Not only activities limited to parks and educational programs, but the MVA is also actively preserving and protecting the North East Swale, and the West Swale wetlands and surrounding areas.

The fate of the MVA Interpretive Centre rests in your hands, Saskatoon.

If a package of cigarettes costs $15.00 for 25, and it is always easy to find money for cigarettes, why not make a monthly deposit for a year to the MVA of $15.00 so that the funding and staffing of the Interpretive Center in Saskatoon and at Beaver Creek can be sustained.

If a family four can dine for about $24.99 at many fast food chains, why not make a monthly deposit for a year to the MVA of $25.00 if you enjoy the parks and trails of Saskatoon.

If a family of four has a delightful time taking in a movie, and spending a sum of $40.00 to enter, and another $26.00 on snacks, why not make a monthly deposit to the MVA of $66.00 for a year as an appreciation of the entertainment your family spends in the city’s river bank parks, at Beaver Creek and Cranberry Flats Conservation Areas.

Saskatoon’s population in 2011 was 222,189, and of that population 170,144 were over the age of 19. If only half of this adult population would donate $20.00 a month for an entire year, an amazing trust fund could be started to support the conservation efforts of this environmental working to sustain the South Saskatchewan River valley now and for future generations. Pop over to the Meewasin Valley Authority website to make a donation and get involved!!!.  Talk to the corporation you work for as well, ask if they would  also love to support the MVA.

If you think it is wonderful to live in a city astride an amazing river, walk along the river bank, and take in the sights of the river valley, it would, indeed, be a splendid idea to send a little thank you to the MVA to continue their environmental conservancy work for the South Saskatchewan River wetlands.

A volunteer for the MVA, Derek Hill stated, “I suppose we all work for the MVA because we believe in the cause.” (Saskatoon Star Phoenix. September 2, 1988)

If you think that classes of children, tourists worldwide, and your family enjoy the self-guided tours available at the MVA, and the galleries showcasing Saskatoon’s history at the Meewasin Valley Interpretive Centre, justsend them a thank you and let them know how important the Meewasin Valley Authority and their several environmental programs and ecologically sustainable initiatives along the South Saskatchewan River Valley are to you.

“We are all the guardians of this precious resource of Meewasin.” (Meewsin Explorer. Vol 21 #5 November December 2014.)

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Armstrong, Jeannie. Discover City Magic at Meewasin Centre. S-P Creative Services. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. May 13, 1989.

Boklaschuk, Shannon. MVA: Funding frozen since 1986, board chair says. The StarPhoenix. April 11, 2006

French, Janet. Trails, butterflies on MVA’s radar. The StarPhoenix. Aparil 7, 2002
Harder, Brandon. Meewasin Interpretive Centre Closure ‘sad day’. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. Thursday June 9, 2016.

Fuller, Cam. MVA centre rich in city’s lore. Saskatoon StarPhoenix. February 20, 1988.

Hanley, Paul. Meewasin Helps Saskatoon shine internationally. The StarPhoenix. December 5, 2006.

Juarez, Julie Fleming. Meewasin Centre to be opened on Monday. The Saskatoon Mirror. February 10, 1988.

Planner calls for lake, drive with view of river. MVAs goals spell green. The StarPhoenix. September 7, 1991

Statistics Canada Saskatoon Census Profile 2011 Government of Canada. 2016-05-02

Tank, Phil. Urgent Needs put MVA in ‘precious position’. Saskatoon StarPhoenix January 4, 2016

The fate of an individual or a nation will always be determined by the degree of his or its harmony with the forces and laws of Nature and the universe. Man is not alone in the universe but is surrounded by sources of power, harmony and knowledge. The fullness of life depends upon man’s harmony with the totality of the natural cosmic laws. Our individual evolution is a job that has to be carried on day by day by each individual himself. It is a livelong task.” Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $20.00 CAD -monthly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

%d bloggers like this: