Cultural Development

Cultural Evolution

“One should pay attention to even the smallest crawling creature for these too may have a valuable lesson to teach us.” ~ Black Elk

Natty Bumppo, the child of European parents, was raised among Delaware Indians. Nathaniel “Natty” Bumppo hapopened to be the fictional protagonist of James Fenimore Cooper’s pentalogy of novels; the Leatherstocking Tales. How might Natty have been described; “In short, he was a noble shoot from the stock of human nature, which could never attain its proper elevation and importance, for no other reason than because it grew in the forest. McGregor

Henry David Thoreau’s “ Walden ” describes a “philosophical” rendition of the forest looking at the tradition of “nature versus civilization, simplicity versus luxury, innocence versus corruption.Thoreau finds moral value away from the life of the towns and cities, and finds recourse in an ideal and indeed transcendental vision of natural harmony.Cartwright

You only need sit still long enough in some attractive spot in the woods that all its inhabitants may exhibit themselves to you by turns.~ Henry David Thoreau

Does the character of Natty Bumppo personify “at once the man of the future and the repository of the values of the past”? Does the portrayal of Natty reconcile the dichotomy between two allegiances ~ nature versus civilization.

Cooper writes in “Deerslayer” “The arches of the woods, even at high noon, cast their sombre shadows on the spot, which the brilliant rays of the sun that struggled through the leaves contributed to mellow, and if such an expression can be used, to illuminate. It was probably from a similar scene that the mind of man first got its idea of the effects of gothic tracery and churchly hues, this temple of nature producing some such effect, so far as light and shadow were concerned, as the well-known offspring of human invention.”

This passage seems to echo even yet, the words of Richard St. Barbe Baker, “In that vast evergreen forest Nature works in perfect rhythm; roots digging deep or exploring nearer the surface for food and moisture. Imperceptibly Nature builds those mighty pillars with aisle innumerable, arches multiplex, in the cathedral of the forest.”

The industrial revolution dramatically changed Europe between c1750-c1850, and came to North America with time lags due to the course of travel for that era. What is it that Thoreau, Baker, and Cooper have found in the forest? What is the contrast felt by novelists and landscape artists of the nineteenth century, and personified in Natty Bumppo?

Does not even the name of this fictional character embrace the “natty” refined characteristics of the cultural stereotype of the immigrant European. What are the synonyms of “Natty” are they not smart, stylish, fashionable, dapper, debonair, dashing, spruced up, well dressed, chic, elegant, trim. And “bumppo” what imagery does the word bumppo evince ~ the cultural stereotype of the bumpkin an “unsophisticated or socially awkward person from the countryside” or the wilderness. What are the synonyms offered up for bumpkin? Does not the thesaurus offer up  rube, lout, hick, chawbacon, churl, clodhopper, cornball, countryman, hayseed, hillbilly, provincial, rube, rustic, yokel, boor, clod, gawk, lout, oaf; greenhorn, tenderfoot, peasant, peon, backwoodsman, mountaineer?

How do you feel emotionally on reading the two lists of words describing Natty, and the derogatory Bumppo?  Which list do you resonate with if you were to describe yourself?  Which list do you reject as a description of your own embodiment?  Do you still feel the same way after reading Baker, Thoreau and Cooper?  Mayhaps even include Ralph Waldo Emerson in this reading list.

Wilkie Collins describes James Fenimore Cooper literary works, Leatherstocking Tales, as ” the greatest artist in the domain of romantic fiction yet produced by America.Twain”  Why?  What is the nostalgia?

What has been gained, by civilization and what has been lost?  What is the reconciliation between the two?

As a child, one has that magical capacity to move among the many eras of the earth; to see the land as an animal does; to experience the sky from the perspective of a flower or a bee; to feel the earth quiver and breathe beneath us; to know a hundred different smells of mud and listen unselfconsciously to the soughing of the trees. Valerie Andrews

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Cartwright, John H. and Brian Baker. Literature and Science: Social Impact and Interaction  Science and society. Science and society. Impact and interaction Edition illustrated Publisher ABC-CLIO, 2005 ISBN 185109458X, 9781851094585

Kennedy, Martha.  Authors

McGregor, Gaile. The Noble Savage in the New World Garden: Notes Toward a Syntactics of Place Publisher Popular Press, 1988. ISBN 087972417X, 9780879724177 P.130

Twain, Mark. Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offences

Don’t let yesterday use up too much of today

“I am glad I will not be young in a future without wilderness.”
― Aldo Leopold

If we intend to provide a better life, and a better world, for future generations, we can’t ignore the quality of the environment we leave them. John Kasich

For more information:
You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

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If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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It is not a farce.…”To be whole. To be complete. Wildness reminds us what it means to be human, what we are connected to rather than what we are separate from.” ~Terry Tempest Williams

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Did you know???

The only answer is to plant more Trees – to Plant Trees for Our Lives.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

“Indisputably, fossil-fuel emissions alone have increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere by about 30 percent since the start of the Industrial Revolution in the late 1700s. Oceans and plants help to offset this flux by scrubbing some of the gas out of the air over time, yet carbon dioxide concentrations continue to grow. The inevitable result of pumping the sky full of greenhouse gases is global warming. Karl

Did you know that “an acre of trees absorbs enough CO2 over one year to equal the amount produced by driving a car 26,000 miles.” Most leases assume an average driver would drive 15,000 to 18,000 km a year. American Forests reports that “In one year, an acre of forest can absorb twice the CO2 produced by the average car’s annual mileage…” and very interestingly “Two mature trees provide enough oxygen for one person to breathe over the course of a year!”

This is why Richard St. Barbe Baker said: “We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees.   As far a forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today.  The only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.”

Enter in your estimated personal carbon emissions in this Carbon dioxide emission footprint calculator and offset estimator which will give you an indication of how many trees you will need to plant this year to offset your carbon emissions. How many have you planted already this year? Your electricity usage kwh/month can be read from your monthly utility bill. Monitoring your automobile odometer will give an indications of miles or kilometers travelled in a month.

“At a global scale, grasslands store 34% of the global terrestrial stock of carbon ecosystems, just behind forests (39%) with agro-ecosystems (17%) also important.” What are Native grasslands worth?

“In the report “The Value of BC’s Grasslands: Exploring Ecosystem Values and Incentives for Conservation” (2009), Wilson found that the value of carbon stored in grassland soils is worth an additional annual value of $438/ha (or $177 per acre; that is, $187 in 2012 dollars), and the value of carbon uptake is worth an estimated $28.46/ha (or $11.52 per acre; that is $12.19 in 2012 dollars) each year.”What are Native grasslands worth?

What are our forests and trees worth? Our forests and trees are natural carbon sequesters, and are vitally important to scrub our carbon emissions from the air. It is so wonderful to reduce carbon emissions, and drive fuel efficient cars, and convert to energy efficient appliances, however there is still carbon emissions produced. So don’t forget the other side of the equation. The only way to remove carbon emissions from the air are to plant more trees, conserve more wetlands, afforest more areas.

The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the afforestation area formerly known as George Genereux Urban Regional Park, are amazing examples, as they self propagate tree saplings yearly, increasing the carbon sequestration exponentially annually. Now if only there were more afforestation areas!!!

Richard St. Barbe Baker encouraged everyone to make a solemn promise to do one good deed each day, plant ten trees, seedlings or seeds each year, and take care of Trees everywhere.*

Technology is notorious for engrossing people so much that they don’t always focus on balance and enjoy life at the same time. ~Paul Allen

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

carbon & tree facts arborenvironmental alliance.

Carbon dioxide emission footprint calculator and offset estimator. Carbonify.com.

Forest Facts. American Forests.

Karl, Thomas R. and Kevin E. Trenberth. The Human Impact on Climate. How much of a disruption do we cause? The much-awaited answer could be ours by 2050, but only if nations of the world commit to long-term climate monitoring now. Scientific American December 1999, PP. 100-105. 1999. Scientific American reprinted Environment Annual Edition 2002/2003 21st Edition. Editor John L. Allen. McGraw-Hill/Dushkin. Article 26. P. 173. ISBN 0-07-250682-2.

Trees absorb a fifth of carbon emissions pumped out by humans. The Telegraph.
What are Native Prairie Grasslands Worth? Why it pays to Conserve this Endangered Ecosystem. Ranchers Stewardship Alliance Inc. Chris Nykoluk Consulting. 2013

For more information:
You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, SK, CA north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city.
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West Off Leash Recreation Area SW OLRA

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Tagged Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque please to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund” (MVA RSBBAA trust fund) and mail it to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area c/o Meewasin Valley Authority, 402 Third Ave S, Saskatoon SK S7K 3G5. Thank you kindly!
Twitter: St Barbe Baker

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1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

The trees and vegetation, which cover the land surface of the Earth and delight the eye, are performing vital tasks incumbent upon the vegetable world in nature. Its presence is essential to earth as an organism. It is the first condition of all life; it it the ‘skin’ of the earth, for without it there can be no water, and therefore, no life.~Richard St. Barbe Baker