we can turn things around

April 30

Did you think it was easy being green for Earth Month?  Can you continue with climate action for all of 2020?  Besides being the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, 2020 is also United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020.  This proclamation was made for “raising awareness of the value of biodiversity amongst the general public, and developing a broad consensus across society for the actions needed by individuals and communities.”UN Decade Biodiversity  “The Strategic Plan was created by the United Nations. Its mission is to “take effective and urgent action to halt the loss of biodiversity in order to ensure that by 2020 ecosystems are resilient and continue to provide essential services, thereby securing the planet’s variety of life, and contributing to human well-being, and poverty eradication.” UN Strategic Plan for Biodiversity

Take action for biodiversity locally.  For a second activity today; how  many smaller words or anagrams can be made from biodiversity?

The 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill became the driver for change, and provided the impetus for founding Earth Day in 1970.   80,000 to 100,000 barrels (13,000 to 16,000 m3) of crude oil spilled into the Santa Barbara Channel. Following this, the United States Environmental Protection Agency was created and the Clean Air, Clean Water and Endangered Species Acts were passed.

Across Canada, “in a single decade, federal and provincial governments established ministries or departments of the environment, environmental protection Acts and environmental assessment legislation….the intergovernmental Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) began to define a national list of species at risk. ” Canadian Encyclopedia  The Canadian Nature Federation grew out of the Audubon Society of Canada.Canadian Encyclopedia   “Recognizing the need for better environmental management, the federal government passed the Canada Water Act in 1970 and created the Department of the Environment in 1971, entrusting the Inland Waters Directorate with providing national leadership for freshwater management.”Environment and Climate Change

The Saskatoon Afforestation Areas, the City of Saskatoon’s tree nurseries, were planted in 1972-1973 as part of the Green Survival Campaign in the war against ecology abuse the afforestation area exhibits an important interchange of human values, over a span of time on developments in town-planning, and architectural landscape design program aimed at improving the future environment of the city;

George Genereux Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area are the only places of their kind which have survived to this day from the original Green Survival afforestation project.  They are afforestation areas ‘preserved in perpetuity’ based on the Green Survival Strategy which are excellent examples of the horticulture phase in the history of Saskatoon, and North America.

Take action for biodiversity at the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas.

The Green Survival Program ’Green Survival’ was an award-winning program for improving the environment, more beauty to see, and conservation of land from erosion with plantings of trees and shrubs in the fight against environmental deterioration and focusses attention on the important role that plant life plays in a healthful environment.

Climate change is a terrible problem, and it absolutely needs to be solved. It deserves to be a huge priority. Bill Gates

Kathy Cronkite of the Saskatoon Star Phoenix wrote the “Green Survival War against ecology abuse.  This concrete and asphalt jungle, filthy air and cold, stark, angular outlines devoid of greenery, are the characteristics of the modern metropolis.  But man is instinctively against this type of life and often retreats to the country to enjoy fresh, clean air and green landscape as far as the eyes can see.  …Saskatoon’s parks and recreation board has preserved the areas of Beaver Creek and Cranberry Flats and the rifle range as open space to be enjoyed by Saskatoonians in pursuit of passive recreation such as picnics.  It [parks and rec] has also ventured into a massive project of planting 200,000 trees for local parks, on 600 acres of land south of Diefenbaker Park and south of the CNR station [Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area].

The Green Survival Campaign spread across North America in 1972 and 1973.  “A ‘Survival’ Message Green Survival has a message.  It is simply that “each individual can have a positive, meaningful effect on the quality of life by planting trees and other living plants.” The appeal of this simple message has spread across the nation, and beyond, to Canada, England, Holland and Germany.

“We are the first generation to feel the sting of climate change, and we are the last generation that can do something about it.” — Jay Inslee

‘Green Survival’ Time.  In France and in Canada’s French-speaking Quebec Province they say, “L’air pur… par la verdure.” In Germany they say, “Grun ist leben.” In some half-dozen countries, they express the message in their own language and here, all across the United States, it is said this way: “Green Survival. It’s something you do.” The term “Green Survival” is being seen in relation to almost any of nature’s growing gifts of plants and trees and shrubs. While communities have adopted programs to receive national recognition as ‘Green Survival Cities.’

“Green Survival  …the battle tends to center around water and air pollution,” said Mr. Kay. “One of the most important parts of our environment has been largely overlooked – the land itself. And it is here that the individual can serve a profound role in improving the world around us.” According to the Green Survival publication, steady progress is being made toward more abundant use of plant material in urban renewal, and toward providing more open space in the center cities of America. It reports that shopping malls are “Including landscaping in their designs and highway planting is becoming more and more apparent. Industry, too, has come to grips with the necessity of pleasing surroundings -both for employee satisfaction and neighborhood good-will, the booklet states. Copies of “Green Survival and the Environmental Crisis”, explaining the role of plant material and the individual in environmental quality …Joining in an all-out national campaign to stimulate individual action in the fight against environmental deterioration” (Free Press, 1970)

Today is Thursday April 30, and celebrating Earth Month. This year’s Earth Day 2020 theme is Climate Action.

 

“The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything.” — Albert Einstein

Facebook Event page

Canada Helps

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Instagram: St.BarbeBaker

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers)

Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 “While the problem can sometimes seem overwhelming, we can turn things around — but we must move beyond climate talk to climate action.” — Ted Turner

“Preparing for climate change has to be a national priority backed by tens of billions in federal investment. Lives are on the line.” — Bill de Blasio

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

‘Green Survival’ Time

“Afforestation can cause more water to be evaporated from the landscape into the atmosphere, … Afforestation greatly reduces annual rainwater runoff, leading to less soil erosion and less unexpected flooding. In addition, more forest cover can result in lower surface temperatures in the region, as trees provide a cooling effect on soils and landscapes. This can have long-term regional or even global implications and contribute to climate change mitigation. “(IUCN, 2016)

“The AAN [American Association of Nurserymen] encourages citizen action for environmental enhancement via its Green Survival Program which says that one person can take many small steps to protect and improve the quality of life in our land. Air, earth, water, sight, sound, energy, peace of mind, personal security – all depend in one way or another on green, growing trees and shrubs and grass and plants which are nature’s gifts. The steps each citizen can take in using these gifts have come to be known by the name “Green Survival.”” (Hinds, 1980)

Trees serve as natural sponges, collecting and filtering rainfall and releasing it slowly into streams and rivers, and are the most effective land cover for maintenance of water quality.” (Somvichian-Clausen, 2016)

“‘Green Survival’ Time.  In France and in Canada’s French-speaking Quebec Province they say, “L’air pur… par la verdure.” In Germany they say, “Grun ist leben.” In some half-dozen countries, they express the message in their own language and here, all across the United States, it is said this way: “Green Survival. It’s something you do.” The term “Green Survival” is being seen in relation to almost any of nature’s growing gifts of plants and trees and shrubs. While communities have adopted programs to receive national recognition as ‘Green Survival Cities'”(‘Green Survival ‘Time, 1977)

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (Urban Regional Park) and George Genereux Urban Regional Park both had their beginnings as part of the Green Survival Program.

Bibliography

‘Green Survival’ Time, Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel and Enterprise. Republished online by Newspaper Archive, May 3, 1977, retrieved July 11 2019

Hinds, Lee W. (1980), The American Association of Nurserymen and its Government Nursery Production Committee, North Dakota: Lincoln-Oakes Nurseries Bismarck and Oakes, retrieved July 11 2019

Somvichian-Clausen, Austa (April 26th, 2016). “The Important Relationship between Forests and Water”. https://www.americanforests.org/blog/the-important-relationship-between-forests-and-water/. American Forests. Retrieved June 30, 2019

“Water, more or less: Do more forests mean more water?”. https://www.iucn.org/content/water-more-or-less-do-more-forests-mean-more-water. IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature. 04 Mar 2016. Retrieved June 30, 2019.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

The importance of forests

“The importance of forests cannot be underestimated. We depend on forests for our survival, from the air we breathe to the wood we use. Besides providing habitats for animals and livelihoods for humans, forests also offer watershed protection, prevent soil erosion and mitigate climate change. Yet, despite our dependence on forests, we are still allowing them to disappear.” (WWF, 2019)

The World Wildlife Fund WWF, made St. Barbe the very first inaugural Honorary Life Member.

“’Green Survival – It Begins With You’ is the slogan of a national campaign being conducted by the American Association of Nurserymen to focus attention on the important role that plant life plays in a healthful environment.” (Cruse, 1971)

“If trees are planted where previously there weren’t any, they will on soak up CO2 as they grow, reducing the amount of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. It is thought that trees, plants and other land-based “carbon sinks” currently soak up more than a quarter of all the CO2 that humans add to the air each year” (The Guardian, 2011)

Part of the Green Survival Campaign were a number of pamphlets.  “Band together to beautify your city.  Individuals and groups interested in improving the appearance of their communities can get ideas from the Green Survival Program sponsored by the American Association of Nurserymen.  So far, the program has designated 12 cities as “Green survival cities” because of their efforts to pull together the resource’s of their local government, businesses and citizens. (Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, Vol. 33, No. 6)

“Perhaps even more telling is the importance of afforestation, forests and trees to the human condition.  Richard St. Barbe “Baker’s message was simple:

If we continue tearing away the earth’s green cloak at the rate that we have we soon won’t have enough trees to provide the oxygen we need to survive, and life will disappear from the planet.  All that’s required is some intelligent stewardship. It’s a world-wide responsibility.

If a person loses one third of his or her skin, the person will die; if a tree loses a third of its bark, the tree will die, and if the world loses a third of its trees, the world will die.

We live less that five minutes without air and the trees give us air we breathe.  We live less than five days without water, and trees are absolutely essential in the water cycle.  We live less than five weeks without food, and without the trees we could not grow food.” (Filson, 1982).

Bibliography

Cruse, Heloise (June 8, 1971), Hints from Heloise, Piqua Daily Call. Republished online Newspaper Archive.com, p. 4, retrieved July 8, 2019

Filson, Bruce K. (October 7, 1982), Western People, p. 5

How do trees and forests relate to climate change?, The Guardian. Guardian News & Media Limited, Feb 11, 2011, retrieved June 30, 2019

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, Vol. 33, No. 6, Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. Republished online by Google Books, June 1979, p. 37, ISSN 1528-9729, retrieved July 11 2019

WWF.  We need to safeguard our Forests.  World Wide Fund For Nature.  (Formerly World Wildlife Fund) 2019.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)  Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.” data-medium-file=”https://stbarbebaker.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/qr-code-for-paypal-donations.png?w=128″ data-large-file=”https://stbarbebaker.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/qr-code-for-paypal-donations.png?w=128″ />
Paypal Donations QR code
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover…A country’s very poor that doesn’t have trees.” ~Richard St. Barbe  Baker

Green Survival. It depends on you!

“Research has shown that a belt of trees 50 to 100 feet wide between a residential and industrial area will absorb and filter, most of the noise, smoke and dust. Trees and shrubs of dense texture, that is, those having small leaves closely packed together, are most effective because they have more openings per square fool between the leaves and branches than do large smooth-leaved plants. These openings diffuse and break up the sounds. However, some of the large-leaved plants having hairy, wrinkled or rough leaf surfaces, such as the sycamore, are also effective.

When trees are used, a barrier of shrubs should be placed near the base of the trunks to; catch the sound waves passing between.” (Stevenson, 1970)

As the City of Saskatoon grows, Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (Urban Regional park) and George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be joined by seven new city neighbourhoods and 70,000 residents.  Additionally, an commercial/industrial and employment sector will be astride the greenspace.

“When today’s elder generation-even the middle generation— was growing up, nature, with woods and swamps and gravel roadways, was often an enemy. Escaping from nature’s threats was a major challenge, and the major role of the home was to provide escape from her forces. Homes were built large and strong to give protection from nature, and were designed to accommodate most of the activities of family life within their walls.  Not so today. Now the problem we face is to bring America’s families back to a natural environment in the face of all the concrete and asphalt and glass and smoke and mechanism and noise and congestion with which we spend our days…  ‘Since we have subdued the forces of nature,’ they [the American Association of Nurserymen] say, ‘we have to do battle with our own technology to bring nature back into out lives.’ There was a need, a few decades ago, for residential architecture that was primarily intended to provide a barrier against nature. Now we have to open our walls and welcome nature back into our cities with all her gifts of order and form, rhythms, and special relationships— gifts in short supply in modern urban conditions.

‘Nature, once an adversary to be brought into captivity,” the nursery industry says, “is now being recognized as a friend … a vital, life-saving, healing friend.’

Trees and bushes and plants are nature’s gift to improve the part of the world in which each of us lives,” the nursery industry people say. ‘Plants help capture the impurities in the air, contribute to a breathable atmosphere, screen out noise pollution, and feed the earth.’

The nursery industry has adopted the phrase ‘Green Survival’ to encompass their philosophy regarding the role of plant materials in the environment. Survival, they say, is possible in the face of the many challenges to the ecology. And because so much that can protect and improve our environment has to do with nature’s gifts of green, growing plants and trees and shrubs and flowers, the color of survival is mostly green.

Green Survival. It depends on you!” (Eifert, 1977)

Humanity was “programmed” to live in a world with plant life and the balance of nature it provides. Restoring and maintaining that balance is a matter of ‘Green Survival.’ “(‘Green Survival ‘Time, 1977)

Bibliography

 

Eifert, Larry (1977), Bring Natural Environment Back Home, Vol. 68 No. 5, September October 1977, California Garden Republished online by Internet Archive, retrieved July 11 2019

‘Green Survival’ Time, Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel and Enterprise. Republished online by Newspaper Archive, May 3, 1977, retrieved July 11 2019

Stevenson, Tom (June 11 1970), A Way to Fight Pollution and Noise: Plant Greenery, Winnipeg Free Press republished online Winnipeg Free Press Archives, p. 12, retrieved July 11 2019

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

 

 

Lungs of the Modern City

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (Urban Regional Park) and George Genereux Urban Regional Park both had their beginning  in 1972 with their commitment to the Green Survival Program

“Trees are the lungs of the modern city. The more industrialize the city, the more trees it requires to purify the air.” (Liddell, 1971)  “the resurgence of academic interest in resource management and environmental planning that has occurred over the past 10 years This resurgence has occurred in parallel with the growth of wide public concern over possible future resource shortages, pollution, the loss of valued wildlife species and landscapes and, more generally, over the possibility and desirability of sustaining current economic development patterns and associated life styles.  …There is a widespread appreciation of the environment and the threats it faces… concerns range from global issues to do with the future of industrial society, the extinction of species and even human survival, down to local issues such as preserving neighbourhood amenities” (Goyder, 1983)

“The nursery industry continued to evolve across the country in the 1970s.  With environmental concerns growing in this period, the Association for American Nurserymen launched their “Green Survival” program.  This initiative stressed plants’ role in buffering noise pollution, trapping air pollutants, cooling the earth, etc. “(National Register of Historic Places Registration, 2014)

The Green Survival Campaign spread across North America.  “A ‘Survival’ Message Green Survival has a message.  It is simply that “each individual can have a positive, meaningful effect on the quality of life by planting trees and other living plants.” The appeal of this simple message has spread across the nation, and beyond, to Canada, England, Holland and Germany. (‘Green Survival ‘Time, 1977)

Afforestation such as the tree planting undertaken by the City of Saskatoon Park’s department to create the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park is the establishment of a forest or stand of trees (forestation) in an area where there was no previous tree cover.

Green Survival” is the nursery industry’s own program for improving the environment, more beauty to see, and conservation of land from erosion with plantings of trees and shrub.  ‘We have a great obligation here…We also have a great contribution to make’” said the AAN President Harold R. Nickel.  (96th Annual Convention Report AAN)

Bibliography

96th Annual Convention Report (PDF), September 28 1971, retrieved July 11 2019

Goyder, Lowe; Goyder, J (1983), Environmental Groups In Politics, Environmental Groups in Politics The Resource Management Series., London, UK: George Allen and Unwin (Publishers) Ltd, ISBN 0-01-329043-4, ISSN 0261-0701, retrieved July 8, 2019

‘Green Survival’ Time, Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel and Enterprise. Republished online by Newspaper Archive, May 3, 1977, retrieved July 11 2019

Liddell, Ken (November 11, 1978). “Ken Liddell’s Column”. The Calgary Herald.

National Register of Historic Places Registration Form Sherman Nursery Company Historic District Charles City Iowa (PDF), NPS Form 10-900 OMB 1024-0018, National Park Service, National Office, Washington, DC: United States Department of the Interior. National Park Service, 2014, retrieved July 11 2019

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)  Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.” data-medium-file=”https://stbarbebaker.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/qr-code-for-paypal-donations.png?w=128″ data-large-file=”https://stbarbebaker.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/qr-code-for-paypal-donations.png?w=128″ />
Paypal Donations QR code
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover…A country’s very poor that doesn’t have trees.” ~Richard St. Barbe  Baker

What is a Friends Group?

 

The Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. was formed as a non-profit incorporation in the same manner as other Saskatoon non-profit groups which support and advocate for their benefactor, respectively.

Friends of the Library  is “a fundraising and advocacy group for Saskatoon Public Library”.  It is known that “Libraries need Friends – it’s just that simple. In fact,… many public libraries were established through the efforts of community members who understood the value of libraries to their communities and also understood that libraries needed community support to survive”

Friends of the Forestry Farm House  has a “mandate to increase awareness of the history of the Saskatoon Forestry Farm Park & Zoo by:a) preserving the Superintendent’s Residence and b) encouraging interpretation of the site.”

Friends of the Bowl Foundation is “about modernizing Saskatoon Minor Football Field allowed us to enhance the visitor and user experience by adding offices, change rooms, meeting spaces, and event and entertainment facilities.”  The Friends is “about rising to every challenge and tackling obstacles head on, because we know that adversity builds character.”

So the question is, if libraries, heritage sites, and sports complexes need “friends” why not forests?  Do not forests and trees need “friends” to raise money and support them? Do not forests and trees need “friends” to raise money and support them, especially when they are absolutely so beautiful to wander through in all the seasons of the year?

The afforestation areas are prime historical, natural and geological heritage sites.  Two afforestation areas have survived since 1972 tree planting as a Saskatoon parks department tree nursery, a heritage testament to Saskatoon as a “Green Survival” City.  The site’s dramatic and diverse landscape topography dominated by natural features, particularly swales and wetlands, and diverse varieties of mature trees, shrubs, plants and ponds that achieve a pastoral appearance; – the landscape of approximately 660 acres in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and additional 160 acres at George Genereux Urban Regional Park are laid out in a park-like manner with planning in the “picturesque” style, design, with the placement and juxtaposition of afforested and natural features that combine to create panoramic perspectives that include mature trees, shrubs.

The afforestation areas feature the preservation of the original indigenous aspen groves and tracts of undisturbed and uncultivated moist mixed grass prairie vegetation throughout the framework of the park. The natural and original setting in the South Saskatchewan River watershed, part of the Moist Mixed Grasslands near Saskatoon that contain Cottonwood, Aspen Grove and Mixed woodland forests, numerous springs, wetlands, and marshes, etc.

The natural green corridor which provides habitats to a variety of indigenous plants, trees and fauna intermixed with drought resistant specimens of exotic species of trees advised under the leading authority of the foremost PFRA of the time.    The afforestation areas are compliant with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change featuring closed forest formations of various storeys and undergrowth and are conforming to the forest concept under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity featuring a complex, continuous, mature forest system of trees, animals and humans.  The afforestation areas act as natural carbon sinks, maintains biodiversity, provides flood control, creates breathable air, carbon storage, healthy maintenance of soils, water purifications, micro- and macro-climate control, and nutrient cycling.

The forests are valued at over Thirty Nine Billion Dollars and act as carbon sinks.  They are named after Richard St. Barbe Baker, O.B.E., L.L.D. and George Genereux who are two outstanding Saskatoon personages.  Additionally, the wetlands namesake, Chappell Marsh commemorates Canadian National Railway General Superintendent Saskatchewan district Benjamin Thomas Chappell who was honoured as Chief Iron Horse, during a sacred ceremonial function by eight Cree chiefs.

How can you help?  Become a member at only $20/year, make a donation, volunteer to help out or serve on the board of directors.  Donations and membership can be made through Paypal or Etransfer using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com  Thank you kindly.

Just as “Friends” support libraries for instance, it is wonderful to acknowledge the efforts of community members who understand the value of forests to their communities and also understand that forests need community support to survive.

If you value your time spent wandering through the woods, consider becoming a member, at $20/year it is less than a movie for one night, and you know you are contributing to saving the forest for many, many days of forest outings throughout the year!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

 

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

 

 

Virtual Tour of George Genereux Urban Regional Park, a movie

 

Virtual Tour of George Genereux Urban Regional Park, Saskatoon,

a winter movie on You Tube

 

 

 

History of “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

133 Range Road 3063, Saskatoon, SK ( NE 21-36-6 W3)

Greenbelts were the brainchild of Ebenezer Howard, Rexford Tugwell and Benton McKaye. These greenbelts were pioneered to control urban growth.

Saskatoon had its own green belt envisioned by Bert Wellman, Saskatoon Planning Department, who literally got out of his office, and walked around Saskatoon’s perimeter in 1960 choosing high spots of land for scenic beauty according to Bill Delainey Saskatoon Historian and local history room librarian.Together with City Planner, Bill Graham, Wellman worked on parkways and planted trees for the Circle Drive Parkway at these sites purchased in 1960. The afforestation areas -Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park as well as several green spaces are a part of this concept, and have been incorporated into the Circle Drive plan as is evident around Gordie Howe Bridge completing the southern portion of Circle Drive in Saskatoon.

Green Survival: War Against Ecology Abuse is what Kathy Cronkite, Staff Reporter for the Saskatoon Star Phoenix called it on May 10, 1972.

The City of Saskatoon Parks and Recreation Board planted 200,000 trees on 600 acres of land as a tree nursery program in 1972 as part of the Green Survival Program sponsored in North America by the Canadian Nursery Trades Association and the American Association of Nurserymen. In total 355 acres of afforestation areas were planted that year. In 1973, 355  additional acres are planted. Originally 2,300 acres were envisioned.  Though, originally established as a tree nursery, George Genereux Urban Regional Park has trees too large to transplant at the current moment of time.

Future residential areas were examined, and the areas for public reserve allocated. The intent was to plant these future areas of open space so that when the subdivision was developed, the  Blairmore Suburban Development Area (SDA), there would be mature trees already established.

In 1972, A. L. Ligtemoet, Assistant Parks Superintendent sets before council that these
afforestation areas be kept in perpetuity ~ this is approved by city council.

George Genereux Urban Regional Park, Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and the third afforestation area south of Diefenbaker Park received plantings of drought resistant trees; black or balsam poplar also known as the balm of Gilead (Populus balsamifera), American Elm (Ulmus americana), Colorado blue spruce ( Picea pungens), Sibernain Elm (Ulmus pumila),  Scotch Pine or Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), Willow, Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo), Green  Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), and the Siberian peashrub or caragana (Caragana arborescens) Tree planting selections recommended by the P.F.R.A. Tree nursery at Indian Head, SK

The rows were planted by weaving in and out, deviating from the centre line by as much as  forty feet, producing a natural forest effect. “We’re stabilizing the sand with a series of spiral shelters – rows of trees planted in semicircles to catch the winds and create vortices of air,”  explains Richard St. Barbe Baker. “The same thing would be valuable on the Canadian prairies where straight  shelter belts cause snow to accumulate.” Star Weekly Toronto, On January 15 1972

In 1979, the parcel of land at NE 21-36-6 was named “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park – 133 Range Road 3063 and is now part of the Blairmore Suburban Development Area

The George Genereux Afforestation Area, besides providing flood mitigation control, and being an amazing carbon sink for the rising greenhouse gases, features an amazing geological history.  The West Swale, is an amazing geological remnant of the Pleistocene Yorath Island Spillway. The West Swale is a low-lying depression created by repeated glaciations and the melting of the last bit of glacial ice. When the glacial lake dam failed, a huge outburst flood (GLOF) occured The dam can consist of glacier ice or a terminal moraine. Failure can happen due to erosion, a buildup of water pressure, an avalanche of rock or heavy snow, an earthquake or cryoseism, volcanic eruptions under the ice, or if a large enough portion of a glacier breaks off and massively displaces the waters in a glacial lake at its base. Peak flows as high as 15,000 cubic metres per second. The northern flow of water in the Glacial North Saskatchewan River Valley was halted by ice, creating Glacial Rice Lake settling into the lowlands west of Grandora. Glacial Rice Lake drained by channels into the South Saskatchewan Valley According to Larry Edwin Hodgins, “The Moon Lake Channel, a major spillway connecting the North Saskatchewan River basin with the South Saskatchewan, and a smaller parallel channel, Yorath Island Channel, also cross the Cory plain….but they are clearly not South Saskatchewan channels.” and the area of the South Saskatchewan may have increased by 140% and 194%

George Genereux (March 1 1935- April 10, 1989) was a seventeen year old high school student in 1952 when he won the Olympic Games Gold Medal for trap-shooting at the Summer Olympc Games held in Helsinki, Finland with 192 out of 200. This was Canada’s first gold medal at the olympics since 1932. Further to this honour, Genereux was bestowed the Lou Marsh Trophy for being Canada’s outstanding amateur athlete of the year, making him the youngest person in history to receive this honour. The City of Saskatoon declared Genereux “Citizen of the Year” in 1952. Canada honoured him as male athlete of 1952. Genereux was installed in the Canada Sports Hall of Fame (1955), Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame on October 31 of 1966, inducted into the Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame 1986 and the Trapshooting Hall of Fame (1986).

Genereux went on to trap shooting events across Canada and the United States. At the age of 13 Genereux won the Midwestern International Handicap Honours, then he acquired 3 successive Manitoba – Saskatchewan junior titles. (source) Genereux won the Junior Championship of North America at the Grand American Handicap, held in Vandalia, Ohio in 1951. During this event, Genereux broke 199 clay pigeons out of 200. Genereux also placed second in the Oslo, Norway World Championships, 1952.

Genereux, attended the University of Saskatchewan to earn his Arts and Sciences degree, then he went on the McGill University to study Medicine graduated 1960. Dr. George Genereux was for years a Professor of Radiology at the Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon.

The biography submitted to City Council stated that “It is considered appropriate to select in his honour this particular tract of semi-wilderness with its favorable habitat for wildlife of many kinds.” “If you can’t help yourself, you should use your God-given talents to help others,’ spoke George Genereux

Plans Around George Genereux Urban Regional Park Area

At the current moment, plans are made for the area surrounding George Genereux Urban Regional Park.  Check out the maps on these three proposals. The Saskatoon Provincial Freeway is being designed in the area west of Saskatchewan Highway 7.  The city of Saskatoon long range planners are designing the Blairmore Sector within city limits to the north of George Genereux Urban Regional Park.  The P4G planners are allocating land use outside city limits in the immediate vicinity of George Genereux Urban Regional Park.

Click here to see maps of the freeway route at the bottom of this story. On mobile? Click here

Provincial Government About the Saskatoon Freeway Project

Provincial Government Saskatoon Freeway

Saskatoon Freeway Presentation When fully developed, the Saskatoon Freeway will provide a high speed, free flow bypass route around Saskatoon for provincial traffic, as well as allowing for another commuter route for the growing city. The key benefits of the freeway include improved safety, improved traffic flow and reduced travel times.

CBC news Province establishes route for Saskatoon Freeway

CBC news Committee being formed to plan Saskatoon Freeway

CBC news Province picks preferred route for Saskatoon Freeway

CBC news Full route mapped out for proposed $2B Saskatoon freeway Bypass project not expected to start for years with no price tag attached
The bypass that one day is expected to route trucks around Saskatoon and reduce traffic in the city is essentially finalized.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

Green Survival

“Green Survival:

War against ecology abuse.

This concrete and asphalt jungle, filthy air and cold, stark, angular outlines devoid of greenery, are the characteristics of the modern metropolis.  But, man is instinctively against this type of life and often retreats to the country to enjoy fresh, clean air and green landscape as far as the eyes can see.  …Saskatoon’s parks and recreation board has preserved the areas of Beaver Creek and Cranberry Flats and the rifle range as open space to be enjoyed by Saskatoonians in pursuit of passive recreation such as picnics.  It [parks and rec] has also ventured into a massive project of planting 200,000 trees for local parks, on 600 acres of land south of Diefenbaker Park and south of the CNR station [Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area]. The Green Survival program is sponsored in North American by the Canadian Nursery Trades Association and the American Association of Nurserymen.”~Kathy Cronkite May 10 1972 Star Phoenix

This September 26th is National Tree Day

Plant a tree (free)

“There is a kinship amongst foresters and planters of trees which has to be understood.  These men are bigger than themselves.  They have been called to be earth healers and Trustees for the Divine Artificer of the Universe.  The are above small talk, cheap entertainment, and trivialities.  This can be sensed in their gentle manners and bearing.  They have indeed realized the oneness of all living things and the part that they play in maintaining the delicate Balance of Nature.  They are indeed Nature’s Gentlemen; they have glimpse the Divine at the heart of Nature, and stand apart from the mob of go-getters.  Their burden is a heavy one. .” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker writing in Caravan Story and Country Notebook.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

In regards to your financial donations to protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5  To support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation will support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas. Please and thank you!  Your donation, however large or small is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

Chaque fois que je fais les courses, je vote résolument “Oui aux aliments en vrac!” et “Oui aux produits biologiques!” Pour mes enfants, je rêve d’un avenir plus sain et sans déchet: je suis heureuse d’y investir mon argent chaque semaine.”
― Bea Johnson

 

Has any one of us ever really seen a Tree? When we become aware of trees we may catch glimpses of them in moments of spiritual vision and, identifying ourselves with the trees, become conscious of the rising of the sap; the upward thrust of life; leaf burgeoning, their consciousness of the changing seasons; we may share their passionately boisterous exuberance of life in the height of a storm, and their tranquility when at rest; with them we will enjoy the glad murmur of the ripening seed clusters when after weeks of drought the steady warm rain brings relief to thirst; and we will know that these creatures, our elder brethern, are intimately related to us in their love and hunger for life. We may even catch their enthusiasm and aspire heavenwards while still rooted in our Mother Earth and in communion with our fellow men and, tree-wise, strive to make the Earth more fruitful again.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker