Where’s Waldo Nature Connect

“Where’s Waldo” Nature Connect at the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas

What do Sherlock Holmes, Nature, “Where’s Waldo”, conservation and Word Search puzzles have in common? Have fun detecting, and finding nature out of doors in the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas. We need your skills! The more eyes that come out the merrier, and the more variety in species can be found! Young, old and anywhere between, groups and individuals, it all makes a difference to compiling a baseline data inventory at the Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and at George Genereux Park in the City of Saskatoon!

There has not been an ecological assessment conducted at the afforestation areas yet. So many people think that there are only afforested tree species [exotic], and brome grass and nothing else, yet how does that explain a baker’s dozen species at risk? How does that explain the moist mixed grassland prairie species in the trembling aspen bluffs which have remained since before 1972, they are over 50 years old? How many people can actually see the laboratory in ecological succession happening in the afforestation areas? What about the wetlands? How come the forest is raising the water-table for the wetlands, and it has not dried up yet? This was a feature which Richard St. Barbe Baker advocated for a lot. What is it that trees do? Their roots go down, down, down, and bring water up to the leave, where there is transpiration, and there are micro-climates of rain for the trees and forests. Can you imagine if there were more and more trees and forests? Then there would not be micro-climates, there would be larger scale nature based solutions to climate change.

Two sundays in a row two different species at risk have been identified. Their lives depend on you to help document the biodiversity in the afforestation areas! So what will happen next Sunday?

Come out on your own or venture out at a group meet up time as follows:

Aug 8 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Aug 15 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
Aug 22 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1038557,-106.7890613 West Side
Aug 29 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Sep 5 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS
GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
Sep 12 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1038557,-106.7890613 West Side
Sep 19 meet at George Genereux Urban Regional Park GPS 52.1089473,-106.7925807
Sep 26 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1006373,-106.755882 SW OLRA
At the meetups, we can help you get familiar with the iNaturalist app.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Joy and Inspiration

UNESCO World Teachers’ Day

5 October 2018

“Education is improving the lives of others and for leaving your community
and world better than you found it.”  Marian Wright Edelman

Given a teacher with a love of out-of-door life, with observant eyes and ears, and the spirit that sympathizes with children’s curiosity and stimulates inquiry, Nature Study will be a joy and an inspiration to pupils.

 

 

“Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.”  William Wordsworth

 

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“I believe in the Oneness of Mankind and all living things and the interdependence of each and all.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Nature is man’s teacher.
She unfolds her treasure to his search,
unseals his eye, illumes his mind,
and purifies his heart;
an influence breathes from all the sights and sounds
of her existence.  Alfred Billings Street

 

 

Nature is man’s teacher.
She unfolds her treasure to his search,
unseals his eye, illumes his mind,
and purifies his heart;
an influence breathes from all the sights and sounds
of her existence.  Alfred Billings Street

 

White stripes and spots ~ Spring arrives

“In the wealth of the woods since the world began
The trees have offered their gifts to man.”~Henry Van Dyke

 

“From Our Hearts With Our Hands For The Earth All The World Together”

~Richard St. Barbe Baker

The fawn trembled on legs so new and untried

A tiny fawn no more than two hours old, sighed;

awakening to the world with  wide-eyed wonder.

Opening, grasping the golden light
Which weaves its way through caragana leaves
To my heart’s delight

Soft as a cloud, the fawn surrendered to the new day.

The fawn trembled on legs so new and untried,

Soon to gracefully arrive, noble astride

The ablest spirits fleet of foot. stay then away.

White stripes and spots mark the young of all white-tailed deer

press closer to its mother, abating all fear

If innocency herself should write,

Soft orange-brown coats spotted with white,

The fawn’s  story would  unfold

soft and sweet to behold

Is ever there an emblem of innocence so appropriate as a fawn

That my love has dawned and rose again,

There was no doubt about it, the transcendent charms

They were pretty creatures, these baby deer, gentle and meek.

A touch so keen, to wake such love of life

As stirs the frail and careful being, who here,

full of grace and timidity and cast around with beauty.

And come around  those innocent great brown eyes.

the slender legs, the swinging stride

Was nought but graceful beauty personified.

In this state of innocency did I but see

Some gracious thought may be;

the fawn and doe, enveloped in care and tenderness

to follow  only the prompting of innocent nature

playful and innocent, and tenderness  which bound all hearts.

Oh the love that knows no end; with drops of dew,

The weary heart’s faithful friend.

Teach me more clearly of Thy life and love anew.

The Baby Deer.  A Fawn so dear.

“In the wealth of the woods since the world began
The trees have offered their gifts to man.”~Henry Van Dyke

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

 

Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.~Albert Einstein

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’” ~ Richard St Barbe Baker

 

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Geometrical skill of the forest architect

O World as God has made it! All is beauty,

And knowing this is love, and love is duty.

Guardian Angel

Have you never gazed into the eyes of your favourite dog – those melting eyes which seem to bespeak such deep devotion and trust, and wondered what might be the nature of the thoughts which course each other through the labyrinth of his mind? Or looked into the broad and mild face of some dear old placidly ruminating cow, and tried to guess how this strange and beautiful world presents itself to her intelligence? From a child, I have been wont to do so. And if through the lustrous eyes of the dog, the friend and companion of my race, I can see but a very little way, and that dimly, into the hidden recesses of his soul, how stands it with yon forest spider which as spread her silken web across the snowberry hedge? What of her inmost soul can I hope to see through those eight small shining beads, by means of which she looks out on a world rendered interesting by flies? Each bead-like eye of this little insignificant spider is a peep-hole through which I would pry into the mystery of life. This it is which renders for me every speck of pulsating living matter, a subject for careful study and reverent meditation.

I shall take it for granted that you already know something about spiders; that they differ from insects in heaving eight legs instead of six; that they are provided with poisonous jaws; that they spin their silken fibre from the hinder end of the body and not from the mouth like a silkworm; and that many of them, like the common forest spider, form webs for the entrapment of unwary insects. Not all spiders form webs like this; some of the hunt and stalk their prey.

Of the web, I think I must say a word or two because misleading and erroneous statements are often made concerning it. The silk which is wonderfully elastic and strong, is produced by the spinning glands in the swollen hinder end of the body. And in these glands a clear viscid fluid is secreted, which, when it is drawn out into the air, in most cases hardens into a silken thread. The fluid produced by one of the glands, however does not harden in this way, but remains viscid and sticky; and this is shed by the spinner on the spiral thread which runs round and round from the centre to the circumference of the web.

To distribute the threads there is beneath the spider’s abdomen, an apparatus of six little movable organs like minute mobile fingers, and each of these is beset with hairlike tubes from the openings of which the silk is drawn from the glands with which the tubes communicate. Some of the tubes are much larger than others, and from these among which the web is stretched, the spider employs finer and more delicate threads produced by different glands.

The particular wonder of insect beauty and spider artifice is but an individual gleam of the universal wonder-radiance of Nature. Both structural beauty and fitness and unerring instinctive performance we now believe to have been alike evolved through natural selection and other agencies. The cunning workmanship of the spider results in the geometrical skill of the spider architect.

Should you spot a circular spider web, it is more than likely from one of the Orb-weaver spiders; members of the spider family Araneidae. They are the most common group of builders of spiral wheel-shaped webs often found in gardens, fields, and forests. The English word orb can mean “circular”, hence the English name of the group. Araneids have eight similar eyes, hairy or spiny legs, and no stridulating organs.

If you see a tangle web, more commonly known as a cobweb, this jumble of threads are most commonly associated with the house and ogre-faced stick spider belonging to the family Theridiidae.

Sometimes you may see a sheet web, lying flat between blades of grass. These sheet webs may be the work of the bowl, doily or platform spider of the family Linyphiidae.

Another spider web are funnel webs which a also horizontal webs, but are formed rather like a tunnel with openings at both ends. The hobo spider of the Agelenidae family may have made this kind of funnel web.

A Noiseless Patient Spider

I marked where, on a little promontory, it stood isolated;
Mark’d how to explore the vacant, vast surrounding
,
It launched forth filament, filament, filament, out of itself;
Ever unreeling them-ever tirelessly speeding them.
And you, O my soul, where you stand
Surrounded, surrounded, in measureless oceans of space,
Ceaselessly musing, venturing, throwing, seeking the spheres to connect them;
Till the bridge you will need be formed – till the ductile anchor hold;
Till the gossamer thread you fling, catch somewhere, O my soul.

-Walt Whitman

Prairie Forest Virtual App Programming by

Gratitude goes out to

Mel Franciz Andes
Jonah Barrett
Brady Warford
Erik Froc
Jonah Barrett
Jordan Rekunyk
Justin Waselyshen
Mel Franciz Andes
Jeremiah Corda
Riley Chometa
Sarah Radke

Computer Systems Technology students
Saskatchewan Polytechnic under Instructor Wade Lahoda

Interpretation courtesy of Professor Lloyd C. Morgan, F.G.S. by Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

To submit interpretive stories to the editor Contact friendsafforestation@gmail.com

Support

Windows to the World

Do we not perceive the world through our senses, which may be said to be the windows through which we look out into the world. Natural history considers how the world may be seen by other animals.

Other animals sensations differ in many ways from our own. Their very organs are sometimes constructed on different principles, and situated in very unexpected places!

There are for instance, animals which have eyes on their backs, ears in their legs, and sing through their sides!

Every cell, indeed, in the animal body is a standing miracle. Now then consider the five ordinary senses which people possess, scientists recognize that insects also posses the senses of touch, taste, smell and hearing. Though they have other senses which people do not. The great majority of insects have their simple eyes in addition to the compound eyes. In spiders, the eyes are distributed over different parts of the body and in different arrangements, usually eight in number and never less than six. The sense of touch may reside chiefly in the antennae or feelers, and yet soft-bodied insects the sense of touch resides in any portion of the body. The mouthparts called the maxillary and labial palpi and the tongue may have a finer sense of touch than even the antennae. The antennae are generally considered olfactory, acting as the nose of the insect. The local organ of touch or feeling in ducks and geese and some other genera of birds, appears to be situated in the integument which covers the extremity of the mandibles, and especially the upper mandible [jaw bone], with which apparatus they are well know to feel for their food in the midst of mud in which they can neither see nor perhaps smell it.

What are the other senses and sensorial powers common to other animals, which may give the semblance of an additional sense?

What, for example, is that wonderful power by which migratory birds and fishes are capable of steering with the precision of the expertist mariner from climate to climate, and from coast to coast?

Whence comes it that the red-wing blackbird, and meadowlark that pass their summers here, or the ruddy duck and pelican who make their homes on the wetlands, are able to track the pathless void of the atmosphere with the utmost nicety, and arrive in our own afforestation areas for the spring migration, and leave for the fall migration.

We know nothing of this sense, or the means by which all this is produced; and knowing nothing of it, and feeling nothing of it, we have no terms by which to reason concerning it. Yet it is a sense not limited to migratory animals.

All the wonderful and important discoveries which have been developed in it, natural history is even yet but little more than it its infancy. New varieties, and species, and even kinds of beings, are still arising to our view among animals, among vegetables, and among minerals. The field opens before us to an unbounded extent, and we should lose ourselves in the subject totally. Every thing is accurately arranged upon a principle of mutual adaptation.

Have you observed insects and wondered what senses they have?

What would happen if you had compound eyes?

Why are the antennae of beetles so varied?

Do you think antennae are for smelling, hearing, touching?

Which sense do you appreciate the most in the afforestation areas? Do you enjoy the sights of the sunset, the smell of the meadow grass with dew upon it? Do you appreciate the touch of the Colorado Blue Spruce needle? Do you love the sound of the Meadowlark, Yellow warbler, Black-capped chickadee the best? Have you ever tasted pineapple weed?

Have you

Prairie Forest Virtual App Programming by

Gratitude goes out to

Mel Franciz Andes
Jonah Barrett
Brady Warford
Erik Froc
Jonah Barrett
Jordan Rekunyk
Justin Waselyshen
Mel Franciz Andes
Jeremiah Corda
Riley Chometa
Sarah Radke

Computer Systems Technology students
Saskatchewan Polytechnic under Instructor Wade Lahoda

With contributions from Sir John Lubbock, scientist, scholar on evolutionary theory and polymath, Dr. Jason Mason Good, M.D. F.R.S., F.R.S.I., and the Springer Nature journal. Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

To submit interpretive stories to the editor Contact friendsafforestation@gmail.com

Support

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