Laughter, the best medicine

International Happiness Day

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

International Happiness Day Wednesday March 20, 2019

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

Each day is a little life. Celebrate this International Day of Happiness at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and wrap yourself in the ever-unfolding happiness which Richard St. Barbe Baker himself speaks of. Jiggle with laughter as the joy permeates your whole being.

“I believe with Ruskin, that I must be just to the Earth beneath my feet, to the neighbour by my side and to the Light that comes from above and within that this wonderful world of ours may be a little more beautiful and happy from my having lived in it. “Richard St. Barbe Baker.

Our climate is so happy, that even in the worst months of the year, “calm mornings of sunshine visit us at times, appearing like glimpses of departed spring amid the wilderness of wet and windy days that lead to winter. It is pleasant, when these interludes of silver light occur, to stride into the woods and see how wonderful are all the colors of decay. Overhead, the elms and poplars hang their wealth of golden leaves.In the hedges pale snow berries and scarlet hips are wreathed with golden rod and here, like knots of rosy buds, on delicate frail twigs. No face welcomed us but the fine fantastic sprays of free and happy evergreen trees, waving one above another in their ancient home. Underneath lie fallen leaves, and the tall grass prairie rises to our knees as we thread the forest paths. Nature, though it be end autumn, is ever in her spring, where the moss-grown and decaying trees are not old, but seem to enjoy a perpetual youth; and blissful, innocent Nature, like a serene infant, is too happy to make a noise, except by a few tinkling, lisping birds and trickling rills?”

“Happy are they that findeth wisdom,
And the man that getteth understanding:
For the merchandise of it is better than silver,
And the gain thereof than fine gold.
She is more precious than rubies:
And all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her.
Length of days is in her right hand,
And in her left hand riches and honor.
Her ways are ways of pleasantness,
And all her paths are peace.”~Proverbs of Solomon

“I am a part of all that I have seen.”—Alfred Lord Tennyson

Laughter, is truly, the best medicine.  Go out into nature, celebrate returning to your roots, and be happy, and healthy.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.


“Be gentle – gentle – gentle with the tree,….Put your hands like this to bless it…I want you to feel your love going out from your fingertips to the …[tree], and, you know, this will help it grow, make it happy…We love to be blessed don’t we? And the trees love to be blessed. ..” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

“He that planteth a tree is a Servant of God
He provideth a Kindness, for many generations
and faces he hath not seen shall bless him.
Who so walketh in solitude, And inhabiteth the wood,
Choosing light, wave, rock and bird,
Before the money-loving herd,
Unto that forester· shall pass,
From these companions, power and grace.
Woodnotes,” Emerson

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SOS Elms Coalition Speaks Out

“Man has lost his way in the jungle of chemistry and engineering and will have to retrace his steps, however painful this may be. He will have to discover where he went wrong and make his peace with nature. In so doing, perhaps he may be able to recapture the rhythm of life and the love of the simple things of life, which will be an ever-unfolding joy to him.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

SOS Elms Coalition Speaks out

SOS Elms Coalition came to fruition with a passion to save Elm trees across the province of Saskatchewan  during the rampage of Dutch Elm Disease DED in North America. Keeping abreast of the progression of the disease and forestry practices, SOS Elms was on top of the situation when the provincial Dutch Elm Disease program was cut from the budget in 2010. In lieu of the program, individual towns, municipalities and cities are taking responsibility upon themselves of educating the public in their area about DED and best conservation practices.

Communities established a regional urban forestry community group or NGO, and in Saskatoon, it is the SOS Elms Coalition providing that support for the city of Saskatoon. These local foresters have had a keen eye out for Dutch Elm Disease, and work together with the City of Saskatoon Urban Forestry Program, and so are able to implement the Dutch Elm Disease DED response plan, so that any infected trees in Saskatoon with DED would not promote a city wide infestation.

“Urban forests in Canada have been dominated by three themes: superficial support by the provincial and federal governments, individuals’ commitment to developing urban forests of excellence, and awareness and action fueled by natural disaster….Cities like Saskatoon, Regina and Moose Jaw saw urban forests created largely with elm due to the limited number of species choice. In the 2000’s greater efforts were expended to diversify these forests. Regina’s Wascana Centre has had a lead role in maintaining tree cover in the prairie city as has SOS Elms in Saskatoon.”~Rosen

“The arrival of Dutch elm disease in the early 1960’s virtually wiped out the American elm (Ulmus americana L.) the street tree of choice in Canada’s cities. From this an urban forestry movement was born including the creation of a number of organizations – from community groups such as SOS Elms”~Rosen-Kenney

SOS Elms Coalition, reached out to the public for unique and spectacular trees of Saskatoon, and published a full colour booklet of these sites. These large tree centenarians grace Saskatoon’s Urban Forest. As an example of some of the trees presented are a Ginkgo Biloba, Limber Pine, Prairie Silk Honey Locust, Black Walnut and Northern Pin Oak grow against all odds in the City of Saskatoon, rare and unique species, indeed.

SOS Elms Coalition sets up conference displays, initiates programs for schools, and assists in community projects bringing to the Saskatoon community an awareness of urban forests, environmental issues and the precautions to mitigate the spread of Dutch Elm Disease.

Members of the SOS Elms Coalition were at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area Clean UP in the summer of 2016. Robert White, of SOS Elms Coalition, was the official photographer at the clean up.

As was the case in 1972, Manchurian Elm, and American Elm were afforested, along with hardy drought resistant tree species such as Colorado Blue Spruce, Balsam-poplar, Scotch Pine, Caragana.  If Green Ash, Manitoba Maple or Willow were planted, there was not a large survival rate of these in the afforestation area.  Native prairie Trembling Aspen Groves are mixed within the afforested woodlands. SOS Elms members recognizing the various locations of Elms in this urban regional park will truly ensure best conservation practices.

SOS Elms placed the City Urban Forest ~ the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ~ in the December 2016 SOS Elms Coalition newsletter

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

The power of citizen action
by Robert White
“For 37 years, the 660 acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (RSBBAA)
in southwest Saskatoon (see map) was mostly neglected even though proclaimed by City Council in 1979 as an “urban regional park” and a “forest in perpetuity”. The park began in 1960 with a visionary idea of City planners” …

…to read more about the RSBBAA in the SOS Elms newsletter click here (pdf)

To learn more about the SOS Elms Coalition or to join this Saskatoon Urban Forestry Organisation, see their Webpage; SOS Elms Coalition Welcome.

The present is full of opportunity. Never before in the history of the planet has mankind been given the privileges and opportunities that are at his disposal today. A great light has been raised and is penetrating the darkness of the world, but alas,
too many with dust blinded eyes have yet to catch the vision. Some of us have. That is our privilege and our responsibility.~Richard St. Barbe Baker.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should support the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker presented by Paul Hanley

You Tube Video Richard St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and West Swale wetlands

You Tube Video Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area – Saskatoon’s best kept secret.

 

 

Our task must be to free ourselves … by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.~Albert Einstein

“This generation may either be the last to exist in any semblance of a civilised world or that it will be the first to have the vision, the bearing and the greatness to say, ‘I will have nothing to do with this destruction of life, I will play no part in this devastation of the land, I am determined to live and work for peaceful construction for I am morally responsible for the world of today and the generations of tomorrow.’” ~ Richard St Barbe Baker

“When tree cover is destroyed it is a threat to both man and the creatures. The protection of world wildlife was in the vanguard of the conservation movement and it was very soon recognised that it was not possible to protect the wild animals and the threatened species without protecting their tree-cover habitat because they, like ourselves, need an adequate supply of oxygen, the very breath of life. The main source of oxygen is the evergreen tropical forests. ” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

@LoraxYXE Twitter.

13th Annual Environmental Activism Awards. Saskatchewan Eco Network. Spring 2015. Paddy Tutty, Director SOS Elms.

Canadian Urban Network Prairies Region Update

Eco-Friendly Sask. Honouring Saskatoon’s Trees. SOS Elms Coalition Urban Forestry Mascot in Saskatoon. Lorax YXE who speaks “for the trees for the trees have no tongues.” EcoFriendly Slide Presentation.

Heather Cline – URBAN FOREST
Reception: Saturday, June 18, 2:00pm
June 18 – July 14 The Gallery / Art Placement

Just a reminder, we have some pretty cool trees growing at innovation place. The Scene. April 2015

Towns will have to monitor elm trees:Sask CBC News March 31, 2010

Marjan, Richard. Co-president of SOS Elms Richard Kerbes with a giant cottonwood in the 200 block of Eighth Street East in Saskatoon on August 6, 2014. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. December 4, 2014.

Modjeski, Morgan. Saskatoon Lorax gives local trees and forestry a voice on twitter. Metro Publishing News.

Re-Imagining Saskatoon towards Sustainability 2015 Slideshow. EcoFriendly Saskatchewan. Dec. 28, 2015.

Rosen, Michael, Trees Canada. A Brief Historical Perspective of Urban Forests in Canada. As published in Histoires Forestieres du Quebec, HIver 2015, Vol 7, No 1 Pages 27-32.

Rosen, M.R. and W.A. Kenney. Urban Forestry Trends in Canada. 0752-B1

SOS Elms News 2016 Deecember No. 30

Williams, Sara. A Celebration of Saskatoon’s Trees. Saskatoon Star Phoenix. March 11, 2016

Williams, Sara. Trees, Trees, Trees Garden Bhat. BAttlefords News-Optimist. March 5, 2016.

Dutch Elm Disease

If you defoliate a large elm and put the leaves together edge to edge, they would cover ten acres. So naturally, the first tree to suffer from air pollution was the elm and, of course, when an elm is suffering from fatigue it is subject to attack by disease: the elm bark beetle, the carrier of the elm fungus, comes along and the tree succumbs.

What do you know about Dutch Elm Disease?

Elms are under risk of Dutch Elm Disease. In 1972 both Siberian Elm Ulmus pumila and American Elm Ulmus americana, were two species of tree “afforested.” To protect the afforestation area, it is vital not to bring Elm cut wood, leaves, or Elm compost into the afforestation area.

To find out more about Dutch Elm Disease there is great information at SOS Elms Coalition, a grassroot organisation formed to care for the health of Saskatchewan’s community tree populations, in particular the threat of Dutch Elm Disease.”

To learn about active projects SOS Elms is engaging upon on visit Facebook SOS Elms

Sara Williams, Saskatoon horticulturist, writes about the new SOS Elms Saskatoon Tree Tour booklet

The City of Saskatoon also provides invaluable information about Elm and at Tree pests and diseases.

The MVA and SOS Elms also work together in management of Elms around Saskatoon. “Thanks to the MVA, the elms and other mature trees between the Gathercole land and the river have received quality treatment, including some high-tech structures to protect tree roots from the grading and bank reinforcement work. ”

Any Elm brought into the Afforestation area must follow the protocols set by the City of Saskatoon, the MVA and SOS Elms. Elm from locations outside the Afforestation area must not be allowed to enter. Please help to keep vigilant, and protect the forest.

In this country, what percentage of the land area do you think should be re-afforested?

The minimum for safety is one third of the total land area. I think what is happening to the elms must be alerting the whole country to the necessity of trees, of the need for more trees. The elm has the largest leaf surface of any tree in Britain. If you defoliate a large elm and put the leaves together edge to edge, they would cover ten acres. So naturally, the first tree to suffer from air pollution was the elm and, of course, when an elm is suffering from fatigue it is subject to attack by disease: the elm bark beetle, the carrier of the elm fungus, comes along and the tree succumbs.

I look at it this way. If a person is living a normal life and not abusing themselves – not smoking too much, not eating too much, not drinking too much – but living normally and eating the right food – they will be fit and well. It is only when they start abusing themselves that they are prone to attack by disease. It is the same with trees.

The next tree to go (the next tree with the largest leaf surface after the elm) is probably the beech: after that the sycamore: and so on. Finally it will be Man’s turn. We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of trees and as far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more trees – to plant for our lives. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker Quotation (Richard St. Barbe Baker answers the first question above)

 

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should go towards  the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

What happens August 18, 2016 at 1:00 p.m.?

We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of Trees.

What happens August 18, 2016 at 1:00 p.m., indeed?

Wouldn’t you love to walk in this urban regional forest, the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, with your grandchildren amid truly magnificent trees, and breathtaking forest scenes? The Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area recently gathered together to promote the environmental health of the St. Barbe Forest with the clean up on July 9, 2016.  This year 8,300 kilograms (18,300 pounds) of trash were removed, including at both clean ups appliances, chesterfields, construction materials with nails, fencing, doors, windows, shingles, and tires were removed. Last year, May 2015, 3,300 kilograms (7275 Pounds) of trash came out of the east side alone!

So now, when you arrive at the afforestation area, you do not have to put your “trash blinders” on.  There are truly delightful 44 year old trees, with an understorey coming in of native plant growth.  There are American and Siberian Elm, Manitoba Maple, Green Ash, Black Balsamic Poplar, Willow, Colorado Blue Spruce, Scotch Pine and Caragana, chosen for their drought resistant capabilities, and for the soil type at the afforestation area.  There is not too much evidence of the Manitoba Maple, and the Green Ash is a very small stand today.  The Scotch Pine and Colorado Blue Spruce have delightfully made groves of small saplings.  The far west side predominates with Poplar, as it was believed that this area would be more prone to flooding.  The east side is mainly  Elm mixed with Spruce.  Caragana, implemented as a wind break and to act as a moisture collector in the winter is seen throughout the east and west sides.  The rows in the afforestation area are fourteen feet apart and weave in and out to give the afforested area a more natural look rather than rows in lines at right angles to each other.  The trees were selected randomly, and set into the soil four to five feet apart.  In every 2-1/2 mile long section, there were fire guards left of 50-60 feet which were not afforested.  Presently, native Trembling Aspen Bluffs are starting to make their home here creating a wonderful complement with the afforested trees.

Two organisers came together in 2016 with different backgrounds, but the outcome or goals for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area overlap.  Jeff Hehn is seeking to introduce the city to “green exercise”, a way to get the population more actively involved with the environment.  There is a wish to also engage residents in a more active winter lifestyle, and Jeff proposed a winter active lifestyles plan.  Julia Adamson is seeking to restore the environment, protect the woodlands and West Swale wetlands, and the wildlife habitat corridor.  Both Julia and Jeff, in consultation with neighbourhood community associations of the city, neighbouring residents of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park 344, environmental organisations, recreational groups, city and MVA staff, came up with some goals and ideas which have amalgamated together from a wealth of ideas and concerned people.

First and foremost came the unanimous decision that a forest was not a place to have trash and garbage.  About 70 volunteers arrived one Saturday in July combining several organisations and individuals. Volunteers poured in from across Saskatoon, and from across the continent, from as far away as Utah and Pennsylvania, from coast to coast in Canada, volunteers came from Victoria, British Columbia; Halifax, Nova Scotia; Quebec; Toronto Ontario; and Winnipeg, Manitoba. This response was fantastic to shift the 8,300 kilograms (18,300 pounds) of freezers, full pails of tar, 85 tires, two car engines, roofs and roofs of shingles, children’s games, clothing, shoes, doors and windows.

Though the volunteers were absolutely fantastic, and would gladly help out again, there is no need for garbage to be filling up an urban regional park.  The enormous amounts of money that could be saved by closing off the afforestation to motorized vehicles would be massive by just recovering the clean up costs alone.  So what measures need to be undertaken to keep the trash out of the forest?

The majority of the trash was piled up alongside the wider pathways, those wide enough that a vehicle could drive upon.  So a very quick and easy solution would be to place vehicle access barriers with large rocks, bollards, gates or fencing to restrict access into the afforestation area.  So three representatives for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area spoke before the Standing Policy committee on Planning and Development on Monday, July 18th.  It was with glad and happy hearts, that recommendations for three different options for vehicle restrictions  were discussed at this very meeting to block access to the Richard St. Barbe Baker afforestation area.  The committee voted that Plan C should be approved, and now this option will go before City Council on August 18, 2016 at 1:00 p.m. for a vote from council.

Will this day see a step towards preserving and conserving the West Swale wetlands?  Will August 18, 2016 see a vote towards protecting the afforestation area, which had been preserved in perpetuity in 1972?  Will City Council vote to keep trash out of the afforestation area and in the landfill where it belongs?  Will the trash finally be out of the forest following the vote taken on Thursday August 18, 2016?  Without vehicles allowed to trespass, the afforestation area will not be littered with trash, and there will be no need for massive clean ups to be arranged for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation area, as it will come into its own as an urban regional park to be enjoyed by responsible citizens of Saskatoon.  Mark your calendars for the outcome of this vote, and the impact it will have on the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area!

“We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~Richard St. Barbe Baker

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For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the City of Saskatoon, Corporate Revenue Division, 222 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0J5…to support the afforestation area with your donation please state that your donation should go towards  the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, or the George Genereux Urban Regional Park, or both afforestation areas located in the Blairmore Sector. Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

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“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.