Tonnes of Elm Firewood Arrggh!

Dutch elm disease confirmed in Saskatoon’s Montgomery Place neighbourhood was reported by Global News as well as by CBC news Dutch elm disease found in Saskatoon tree and 650 CKOM Dutch elm disease back in Saskatoon for the first time since 2015 on Sept 15 2020

The fact that Dutch Elm Disease, and the Dutch Elm beetle is so close to the two afforestation areas -George Genereux Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Park- is a cause for concern.

Can you believe that Global News in a follow up report stated that Over 13 tonnes of elm firewood removed from Saskatoon properties

This is in addition to the elm found discarded in the afforestation areas during the community volunteer clean ups. During the afforestation of these urban regional parks as tree nurseries, the City of Saskatoon parks received advice from the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation administration on drought resistant and hardy trees, which included Elm. There is indeed Elm which were planted in 1972 in George Genereux Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Park. The Dutch Elm Disease beetle could cause havoc in these two amazing afforested areas! Please take care and support our fundraiser!

nfortunately there have been those who are too lazy or too cheap to save the city’s urban forests, and will not pay the landfill fees to dipose of their Elm leaves and branches properly in the landfill.  Something must be done!

Facebook Fundraiser. STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic  from entering the afforestation areas! Help protect this City of Saskatoon Urban Regional Park!

Help support this fundraiser to STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic from entering the afforestation areas!Always dispose of any elm wood at the City Landfill The fundraiser will go towards vehicle mitigation barriers and park identification signage to STOP illegal motorized trespass and illegal dumping! Please SHARE this fundraiser, taking care of trees is vitally important in this era of climate change! Protect our elms! Please share the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. [a non profit charity] fundraiser. You can get a charitable receipt By donating to the STOP Dutch Elm Disease fundraiser, you may receive as much as 53% of the amount you donated back at tax-time.

https://www.facebook.com/donate/246565156761430/

Please be diligent in watching for anyone who may be illegally dumping in George Genereux Urban Regional Park or in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and advise them of the dangers of dumping in the forest.

Not only is trash unslightly, but Dutch Elm Disease can be fatal to the elm trees in the afforestation areas. SOS Trees Coalition also deals with Dutch Elm Disease, as they started out under the name of SOS Elms Coalition.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Dutch Elm Disease

If you defoliate a large elm and put the leaves together edge to edge, they would cover ten acres. So naturally, the first tree to suffer from air pollution was the elm and, of course, when an elm is suffering from fatigue it is subject to attack by disease: the elm bark beetle, the carrier of the elm fungus, comes along and the tree succumbs.

What do you know about Dutch Elm Disease?

Elms are under risk of Dutch Elm Disease. In 1972 both Siberian Elm Ulmus pumila and American Elm Ulmus americana, were two species of tree “afforested.” To protect the afforestation area, it is vital not to bring Elm cut wood, leaves, or Elm compost into the afforestation area.

To find out more about Dutch Elm Disease there is great information at SOS Elms Coalition, a grassroot organisation formed to care for the health of Saskatchewan’s community tree populations, in particular the threat of Dutch Elm Disease.”

To learn about active projects SOS Elms is engaging upon on visit Facebook SOS Elms

Sara Williams, Saskatoon horticulturist, writes about the new SOS Elms Saskatoon Tree Tour booklet

The City of Saskatoon also provides invaluable information about Elm and at Tree pests and diseases.

The MVA and SOS Elms also work together in management of Elms around Saskatoon. “Thanks to the MVA, the elms and other mature trees between the Gathercole land and the river have received quality treatment, including some high-tech structures to protect tree roots from the grading and bank reinforcement work. ”

Any Elm brought into the Afforestation area must follow the protocols set by the City of Saskatoon, the MVA and SOS Elms. Elm from locations outside the Afforestation area must not be allowed to enter. Please help to keep vigilant, and protect the forest.

In this country, what percentage of the land area do you think should be re-afforested?

The minimum for safety is one third of the total land area. I think what is happening to the elms must be alerting the whole country to the necessity of trees, of the need for more trees. The elm has the largest leaf surface of any tree in Britain. If you defoliate a large elm and put the leaves together edge to edge, they would cover ten acres. So naturally, the first tree to suffer from air pollution was the elm and, of course, when an elm is suffering from fatigue it is subject to attack by disease: the elm bark beetle, the carrier of the elm fungus, comes along and the tree succumbs.

I look at it this way. If a person is living a normal life and not abusing themselves – not smoking too much, not eating too much, not drinking too much – but living normally and eating the right food – they will be fit and well. It is only when they start abusing themselves that they are prone to attack by disease. It is the same with trees.

The next tree to go (the next tree with the largest leaf surface after the elm) is probably the beech: after that the sycamore: and so on. Finally it will be Man’s turn. We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of trees and as far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more trees – to plant for our lives. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker Quotation (Richard St. Barbe Baker answers the first question above)

 

 

 

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal

Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $20.00 CAD -monthly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

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