The Search For the Missing Linden

“To respect a mystery is to make way for the answer.”
― Criss Jami

There are special bio-blitzes or eco-quest days coming up, but if you wish to be a detective an conduct your own bio-blitz using iNaturalist when you are free, that is fine as well. On these days, people will be trying to solve the mystery – The Search for the Missing Linden.

So where is it? Where is the Linden Tree? A prize worth $50 retail is offered to whomever finds the Linden Tree, and sends in the GPS coordinates to friendsafforestation@gmail.com for confirmation!

In 1984, the people of Saskatoon started the Richard St. Barbe Baker Foundation with an aim “to assist non-government organizations by offering them administrative, technical, and education assistance related to forestry and trees – focusing on Canada and developing countries”.

Further to this the foundation had three objectives as follows.

  1. In cooperation with individuals and non-governmental organizations, to promote, support and undertake non-profit tree planting projects in Canada and worldwide;
  2. To develop educational materials related to tree planting and forestry for use in both developed and developing countries;
  3. To commemorate the name and works of the late Richard St. Barbe Baker.

On June 4 and 5, 1984 – also celebrating World Environment Day – Saskatoon hosted the founding conference of the Richard St Barbe Baker foundation. The conference was to promote the wise use and conservation of the world’s tree resources.

Now, then as part of the aforementioned conference ceremonies, a Linden tree, Tiliaceae, was planted at two locations in Saskatoon; Diefenbaker Center and at the west side entrance of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

“Those who dare seek, shall find what they are seeking for.”
― Lailah Gifty Akita

So where is it? Where is the Linden Tree? A prize worth $50 retail is offered to whomever finds the Linden Tree, and sends in the GPS coordinates to friendsafforestation@gmail.com for confirmation!

We have four planned meet ups on the west side of Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area to search for the Linden Tree.


Aug 1 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS
52.102562, -106.788275 West Side


Aug 22 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS
52.102562, -106.788275 West Side

Se
p 12 meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS
52.102562, -106.788275 West Side

Description of the family as follows:

BASSWOOD Tilia americana, Linnaeus FAMILY AND GENUS DESCRIPTION- The Linden family. Tlliaceae, comprises about 35 genera with probably 175 species found in temperate and tropical regions. The members consist of trees, shrubs, and a few herbs. One genus, Tilia, alone has tree representatives in North America. This genus comprises about 20 species here 8 of which are native to North America.

BASSWOOD. Tilia americana, Linnaeus. FAMILY AND GENUS DESCRIPTION-The Linden family. Tiliaceae, its leaves are pubescent and grayish-green beneath leaves with green and smooth lower surfaces. Trunk straight, clean, with little taper.

BARK-On young stems dark gray and smooth.

TWIGS-Smooth or very finely hairy, shining:, bright red; second year olive, olive-red, usually zigzag, mucilaginous if chewed, characteristic blunt conical masses with intervening lighter colored areas are present.

BUDS-deep red. Unsymmetrical buds alternate: terminal bud absent; ovoid. 2-ranked, stout, often out in June. Perfect, regular, sweet, fragrant, cymose clusters. The long peduncle which bears the flowers is united for about half its length with a conspicuous green bract. white flowers arranged in drooping clusters attached to a green bract

FRUIT-A woody, spherical, nut-like drupe about the size of a pea. Occurs singly or in small cluster with a common stalk attached to a leafy bract and often persisting far into winter.

WOOD-Diffuse-porous; rays distinct, but colorless; light, soft, compact, moderately strong light brown to nearly white, fine in texture; little difference between spring wood and summer wood Weighs 28.20 lbs. per cubic foot.

DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS—The Basswood. also known as Linden, Lime-tree, Whitewood Beetree. Whistle-wood, and Lynn, large, firm un- equally based leaves with green and smooth lower surfaces, by its smooth bright red twigs, by its alternate, deep red, unsymmetrical buds with 2-3 visible scales, by its white flowers arranged in drooping clusters attached to a green bract, and by its woody spherical nut-like drupe about the size of a pea attached to winged bracts. The dark funnel-shaped areas In the inner bark alternating with lighter areas as seen in a cross-section of a twig are characteristic. The smooth dark gray bark of younger stems and the thick longitudinally-furrowed bark on older trunks are distinguishing features.

HABITAT—Rarely grows in pure stands, but usually mixed with other hardwoods. Prefers rich soils in bottomlands. It can endure considerable shade. It suffers little from windfall but occasionally from windbreak upon exposed situations.

PROPAGATION OF THE SPECIES— Seeds or seedlings may be, planted. If seedlings are used, they should be planted early in spring before growth starts. The tree sprouts from stump very freely. It grows rapidly, produces beautiful sweet smelling flowers, and is rarely attacked by fungi. It is one of our most attractive ornamental trees.

WHITE BASSWOOD Tilia heterophylla, —Usually 150-100 ft. high but may reach a height of 90 ft. with a diameter of 41 feet. It becomes as thick but not so high as the Common Basswood. Trunk -straight, clean, slightly tapering. Crown dense, broad, rather rounded.

BARK—Similar to that of the common Basswood

ETC for 8 species in North America

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

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