Interpretation in the forests

Raising money is a wonderful thing to do when there are amazing results!  If there were interpretive signs in the afforestation areas – what wonders would they tell tourists, users, classrooms when they come out to enjoy this mixed woods wonderland?

Perhaps people would like to know a bit about the history of the afforestation areas and how they began under the award winning auspices of the “Green Survival Program” sponsored in North America by the Canadian Nursery Trades Association and the American Association of Nurserymen.  “Afforestation” is the planting of trees where there were none before, and turns out afforestation is great for climate change as forests are amazing at greenhouse gas capture. In Saskatoon, our two afforestation areas, Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux Urban Regional Park, began as tree nurseries, and that is why they are both mixed woodland scenic green spaces all year round for nature lovers, special interest groups, solitude seekers, tourists, environmental stewards, students, movement based visitors, citizen scientists.  Some of the trees which were afforested were plantings of drought resistant trees; black or balsam poplar also known as the balm of Gilead (Populus balsamifera), American Elm (Ulmus americana), Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii), Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila), Scotch Pine or Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), Willow (Salix spp), Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo), Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), and the Siberian peashrub or caragana (Caragana arborescens).   These arose in a moist mixed grasslands plains eco-system featuring such native species as; Red osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) , Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides), Saskatoon (Amelanchier alnifolia), Western Snowberry (Symphoricarpos occidentalis) and Silverberry (Elaeagnus commutata).  Tree planting selections recommended by the P.F.R.A. Tree nursery at Indian Head, SK

The trees planted in 1972, of course, are too large now to transplant from these original City of Saskatoon tree nurseries, but they were named as urban regional parks in 1979, for everyone to enjoy as the city expands out to the south west area of Saskatoon.

“Curious about their heritage, natural and man-made, of the environment around them – … geological formations, wildlife, … hydrogeology, …etc. Who can be bored? We are too busy finding out all kinds of interesting things. “(Farquharson, 2000)

There is so much much more at the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas, Saskatoon’s best kept secrets.  Stay tuned for the next update about what would be intriguing to have on an interpretive sign at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and at George Genereux Urban Regional Park!

“People usually consider walking on water or in thin air a miracle. But I think the real miracle is not to walk either on water or in thin air, but to walk on earth. Every day we are engaged in a miracle which we don’t even recognize: a blue sky, white clouds, green leaves, the black, curious eyes of a child — our own two eyes. All is a miracle.” Nhat Hanh

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.  at friendsafforestation@gmail.com  We are conducting a virtual bottle drive if you phone or contact us, we will make safe arrangements for pick up and provide you with a charitable receipt.   Please and thank you!  Your donation is greatly appreciated.

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

 

 

“The simple act of planting a tree, which is in itself a practical deed, is also the symbol of a far reaching ideal, which is creative in the realm of the Spirit, and in turn reacts upon society, encouraging all to work for the future well being of humanity rather than for immediate gain. ” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 “We forget that we owe our existence to  the presence of Trees.   As far as forest  cover goes, we have never been in such a  vulnerable position as we are today.  The  only answer is to plant more Trees – to  Plant Trees for Our Lives.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

“All processes in the ecosystem are disturbed by human activities in the valley.  Nevertheless, there is surprising diversity and abundance of lifeforms.  In its conservation role, the MVA should ensure that human enjoyment of this natural resource does not significantly deter from the health of the resource.” (Fitzgibbon, 1982)

 

The importance of forests

“The importance of forests cannot be underestimated. We depend on forests for our survival, from the air we breathe to the wood we use. Besides providing habitats for animals and livelihoods for humans, forests also offer watershed protection, prevent soil erosion and mitigate climate change. Yet, despite our dependence on forests, we are still allowing them to disappear.” (WWF, 2019)

The World Wildlife Fund WWF, made St. Barbe the very first inaugural Honorary Life Member.

“’Green Survival – It Begins With You’ is the slogan of a national campaign being conducted by the American Association of Nurserymen to focus attention on the important role that plant life plays in a healthful environment.” (Cruse, 1971)

“If trees are planted where previously there weren’t any, they will on soak up CO2 as they grow, reducing the amount of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. It is thought that trees, plants and other land-based “carbon sinks” currently soak up more than a quarter of all the CO2 that humans add to the air each year” (The Guardian, 2011)

Part of the Green Survival Campaign were a number of pamphlets.  “Band together to beautify your city.  Individuals and groups interested in improving the appearance of their communities can get ideas from the Green Survival Program sponsored by the American Association of Nurserymen.  So far, the program has designated 12 cities as “Green survival cities” because of their efforts to pull together the resource’s of their local government, businesses and citizens. (Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, Vol. 33, No. 6)

“Perhaps even more telling is the importance of afforestation, forests and trees to the human condition.  Richard St. Barbe “Baker’s message was simple:

If we continue tearing away the earth’s green cloak at the rate that we have we soon won’t have enough trees to provide the oxygen we need to survive, and life will disappear from the planet.  All that’s required is some intelligent stewardship. It’s a world-wide responsibility.

If a person loses one third of his or her skin, the person will die; if a tree loses a third of its bark, the tree will die, and if the world loses a third of its trees, the world will die.

We live less that five minutes without air and the trees give us air we breathe.  We live less than five days without water, and trees are absolutely essential in the water cycle.  We live less than five weeks without food, and without the trees we could not grow food.” (Filson, 1982).

Bibliography

Cruse, Heloise (June 8, 1971), Hints from Heloise, Piqua Daily Call. Republished online Newspaper Archive.com, p. 4, retrieved July 8, 2019

Filson, Bruce K. (October 7, 1982), Western People, p. 5

How do trees and forests relate to climate change?, The Guardian. Guardian News & Media Limited, Feb 11, 2011, retrieved June 30, 2019

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, Vol. 33, No. 6, Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. Republished online by Google Books, June 1979, p. 37, ISSN 1528-9729, retrieved July 11 2019

WWF.  We need to safeguard our Forests.  World Wide Fund For Nature.  (Formerly World Wildlife Fund) 2019.

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Should you wish to help protect / enhance the afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)  Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.” data-medium-file=”https://stbarbebaker.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/qr-code-for-paypal-donations.png?w=128″ data-large-file=”https://stbarbebaker.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/qr-code-for-paypal-donations.png?w=128″ />
Paypal Donations QR code
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“You can gauge a country’s wealth, its real wealth, by its tree cover…A country’s very poor that doesn’t have trees.” ~Richard St. Barbe  Baker

Green Survival. It depends on you!

“Research has shown that a belt of trees 50 to 100 feet wide between a residential and industrial area will absorb and filter, most of the noise, smoke and dust. Trees and shrubs of dense texture, that is, those having small leaves closely packed together, are most effective because they have more openings per square fool between the leaves and branches than do large smooth-leaved plants. These openings diffuse and break up the sounds. However, some of the large-leaved plants having hairy, wrinkled or rough leaf surfaces, such as the sycamore, are also effective.

When trees are used, a barrier of shrubs should be placed near the base of the trunks to; catch the sound waves passing between.” (Stevenson, 1970)

As the City of Saskatoon grows, Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (Urban Regional park) and George Genereux Urban Regional Park will be joined by seven new city neighbourhoods and 70,000 residents.  Additionally, an commercial/industrial and employment sector will be astride the greenspace.

“When today’s elder generation-even the middle generation— was growing up, nature, with woods and swamps and gravel roadways, was often an enemy. Escaping from nature’s threats was a major challenge, and the major role of the home was to provide escape from her forces. Homes were built large and strong to give protection from nature, and were designed to accommodate most of the activities of family life within their walls.  Not so today. Now the problem we face is to bring America’s families back to a natural environment in the face of all the concrete and asphalt and glass and smoke and mechanism and noise and congestion with which we spend our days…  ‘Since we have subdued the forces of nature,’ they [the American Association of Nurserymen] say, ‘we have to do battle with our own technology to bring nature back into out lives.’ There was a need, a few decades ago, for residential architecture that was primarily intended to provide a barrier against nature. Now we have to open our walls and welcome nature back into our cities with all her gifts of order and form, rhythms, and special relationships— gifts in short supply in modern urban conditions.

‘Nature, once an adversary to be brought into captivity,” the nursery industry says, “is now being recognized as a friend … a vital, life-saving, healing friend.’

Trees and bushes and plants are nature’s gift to improve the part of the world in which each of us lives,” the nursery industry people say. ‘Plants help capture the impurities in the air, contribute to a breathable atmosphere, screen out noise pollution, and feed the earth.’

The nursery industry has adopted the phrase ‘Green Survival’ to encompass their philosophy regarding the role of plant materials in the environment. Survival, they say, is possible in the face of the many challenges to the ecology. And because so much that can protect and improve our environment has to do with nature’s gifts of green, growing plants and trees and shrubs and flowers, the color of survival is mostly green.

Green Survival. It depends on you!” (Eifert, 1977)

Humanity was “programmed” to live in a world with plant life and the balance of nature it provides. Restoring and maintaining that balance is a matter of ‘Green Survival.’ “(‘Green Survival ‘Time, 1977)

Bibliography

 

Eifert, Larry (1977), Bring Natural Environment Back Home, Vol. 68 No. 5, September October 1977, California Garden Republished online by Internet Archive, retrieved July 11 2019

‘Green Survival’ Time, Fitchburg, Massachusetts: Sentinel and Enterprise. Republished online by Newspaper Archive, May 3, 1977, retrieved July 11 2019

Stevenson, Tom (June 11 1970), A Way to Fight Pollution and Noise: Plant Greenery, Winnipeg Free Press republished online Winnipeg Free Press Archives, p. 12, retrieved July 11 2019

 

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“St. Barbe’s unique capacity to pass on his enthusiasm to others. . . Many foresters all over the world found their vocations as a result of hearing ‘The Man of the Trees’ speak. I certainly did, but his impact has been much wider than that. Through his global lecture tours, St. Barbe has made millions of people aware of the importance of trees and forests to our planet.” Allan Grainger

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nation saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker.

“I believed that God has lent us the Earth. It belongs as much to those who come after us as to us, and it ill behooves us by anything we do or neglect, to deprive them of benefits which are in our power to bequeath.” Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: