Forest connections

Discovering an alliance and affiliation with nature. Taking photos through the iNaturalist app on the smartphone, to immerse an outdoor, nature-loving invigorating afternoon. An idyllic way to find a connection in the forest, to see the liason and relation between trees and understorey, to find the kinship between in this semi-wilderness area, and explore nature’s forest habitat. Experience a care-free healthful, informal nature relationship.

Eventbrite Registration Sunday Sep 26, 2021 at 2:00 pm Nature Connect Bio-Blitz and Forest Walk meet at Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area GPS 52.1012839, -106.749158 meet at the SW Off Leash Recreation Area Just in time for World Environmental Health Day, check out the forest health today.

National Forest Week The last full week of September. Maple Leaf Day the Wednesday of that week.
National Forest Week The last full week of September. Maple Leaf Day the Wednesday of that week.

This program for National Forest Week is brought to you by the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas an environmental non-profit charity that was created to preserve and restore the 326-acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and the 148-acre George Genereux Urban Regional Park. Our work reinforces the 1979 City Council decision designating these afforestation areas on the western fringe of Saskatoon to “be preserved in perpetuity.” They are important habitat for wildlife as well as semi-wild public spaces for recreation and nature immersion. The larger of these two areas is named after Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982), who has been called the “first global conservationist” and in recognition of this he was made the first Honorary Life Member of the World Wildlife Fund in 1969. A British forester who also homesteaded and studied in Saskatoon, he dedicated his entire life unfailingly to the preservation and planting of trees and forests.

This is one session in a week long series of events celebrating National Forest Week with a theme – “Our Forests – Continually Giving”

Sat. Sept 18 7:00 Saskatoon’s Wildlife—the real night life in Saskatoon! Saskatoon’s trail cams reveal who’s who. 

Sept 19 2:00 Nature Snapshot in Time

Sun Sep. 19 2:00 Forestry Farm Walking Tour

Canada-wide CLS environmental education program explores historical time lines Sun. Sep 19 7:00

Mon Sept 20 2:00 Flag raising Ceremony at City Hall – National Forest Week

Mon Sept 20 7:00 The Urban Forest and Climate Change

During National Forest Week enjoy the self-guided SOS Tree Tour of unique trees in our fair city!

Tues Sept 21 7:00  Dr. Colin Laroque Shelterbelts SB- Decision Support System and Agroforestry

Wed. Sept 22 Maple Leaf Day 7:00 National Healing Forests Truth and Reconciliation

Thurs Sept 23 7:00 Urban forests and greenspaces enhance Saskatoon’s quality of life.

Fri Sept Sep 24 at 7:00 pm When and Where did you see What?!?

Sat Sept 25 7:00 PaRx in Saskatchewan, PaRx, Canada’s First National Prescription Program has officially arrived in Saskatchewan!

Sunday Sunday Sep 26 at 2:00 Forest connections and guided walk

Sunday Sep 26, 2021 at 7:00 pm Our Forests.  Are They Alive?

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

What in the world is a bio-blitz?

A Bio-Blitz is time spent looking for life (bio) in the form of mushrooms, plants, animals, and insects. Another word for Bio-Blitz is Eco-Quest. Here the word Eco-Quest refers to an investigation or a quest to explore what is living in the habitat or environment, or what makes up the eco-system of the area.

Bio-Blitzes or Eco-Quests are ways to connect with nature, become more observant of the surroundings, and discover the world of the afforestation areas.

There is a deep interconnectedness of all life on earth, from the tiniest organisms, to the largest ecosystems, and absolutely between each person.

Bryant McGill

Enviromental sustainability is key in naturing a healthy ecosystem that is mutually beneficial to a healthier quality of life today and in the future.

Wayne Chirisa

Download iNaturalist on your smart phone, sign in with you own user name and password and if you meet up in the afforestation areas Sundays at Two, we will show you how to use iNaturalist in nature to create a database of living organisms who share the park space.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′

Addresses:

Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A

Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A

S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A

NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063

Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot

Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com

Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map

Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Blogger: FriendsAfforestation

Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area

Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Reddit: FriendsAfforestation

Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas

Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )

Donate your old vehicle, here’s how!  

Support using Canada Helps

Support via a recycling bottle donation

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

The Single Most Important Thing You Need To Know About Forest Restoration

What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.

Chris Maser

Before and After photos

#GenerationRestoration United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

The shelter roof was coming down and actually a log had rolled off of it the day before the restoration event occurred, so *whew* it was a lucky coincidence that this event took place as there are classrooms of children and families also with children using the forest at the moment who may be curious about structures such as these. Sorry we did not take a picture of the sagging roof before the event started. At the end of the event these were the volunteers remaining (There were those who left early before the photos were taken.)

A huge thank you goes out to the volunteers who came out to help with making the forest safer for users of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area. Also another thank you goes out to these volunteers who assisted to make the forest safer for the elm trees growing near this structure. With the Elms facing two natural threats -Dutch Elm Disease and the Elm ZigZag Sawfly both devastating for Elm trees- it is dangerous for people to also be a threat to the elms of the afforestation area. There are indeed wrong seasons, and methods for pruning, or taking down elm trees lest Dutch Elm Disease enter into the Forest.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.

Margaret Mead

The volunteers who came out for this restoration event on Arbor Week, did indeed become forest guardians as advocated by Richard St. Barbe Baker to take care of trees everywhere! These citizens also took an active role on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal SDG 15 Life On Land and helped to stop the degradation of forests.

The restoration work did involve the taking down of a lean-to tied to existing trees in the middle of a forest area with endangered species at risk in the forest. This restoration will also encourage forest users to stay on trails, enhancing forest guardianship of the woodlands.

1/ Cutting down trees in an area high with Elm invites Dutch Elm Disease if the tree cutter(s) is not properly trained on tree removal (and it is an afforestation area preserved in perpetuity)

2/ Shelters invite homeless people who live off the grid who are not a good mix for the current influx of family and school groups utilizing the afforestation areas as legitimate users.

3/ Shelters are suggestive that people should camp over night, or possibly have a fire detrimental to legitimate users and stewards of the forest, classrooms, and children of families, the neighbouring residents and the CNR Chappell yards oil and gas trains

5/ The Shelter is not built to code, and could be a safety hazard for families or classrooms of youngsters frequenting the trails on the east side of RSBBAA

6/ People are encouraged to go off the FFTB trails to build, enlarge, explore the shelter, and squish the species at risk on the east side of RSBBAA

7/ People who do not identify tree species well, could not only utilize the elm in their shelter construction, but also the tree species at risk in the east side of RSBBAA

8/ The shelter is not made with dead fall. The shelter is encouraging the wanton felling of trees without permissions from the City of Saskaton [CoS] and without abiding by the CoS Tree policy. Felling of trees without proper arboreal certificates of training is also a very dangerous activity as the east side of RSBBAA is becoming more populated with trail users.

9/ Making the east side of RSBBAA safer is a good thing, and also encourages safe trail use just in time for International Trails Day on June 5

10/ Taking care of trees during Saskatoon’s First ever Arbor Week shows citizen commitment to forest and tree health. It is not enough to plant trees, Richard St. Barbe Baker advocated that trees need to be protected also.

11/ People illegally felling CoS trees in an afforestation preserved in perpetuity threatens the trails, the users, and the forest integrity as a safe greenspace.

12/ Restore the afforestation area just in time for World Environment Day on June 5.

14/ Become a member of #generationrestoration, and honour the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

14/ Take action on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal SDG 15, Life On Land You can help stop the degradation of forests.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

The environment is where we all meet; where we all have a mutual interest; it is the one thing all of us share.

Lady Bird Johnson

Tree Photo Challenge

While walking along the trails with your COVID bubble, take photos of as many different kinds of trees as you can find in the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, the forest is an amazing Winter Wonderland! Can you find an Engelmann’s Spruce, or perhaps a Scots Pine? Maybe track the entire Trembling Aspen Grove, or find a sweet snowberry bush.

Fresh Snow in the Sun
Fresh Snow in the Sun

This challenge is part of the WinterCityYXE Take It Outside Winter Staycation package! Come “Outside Safely” to the 326 acre Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

Using iNaturalist will help with the identification of the tree!
On your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, open the App Store
On your android phone or tablet, open Google Play
Browse or search for iNaturalist and download.


Check out the iNaturalist.pdf pamphlet! In your iNaturalist tree observation include the full photo of the tree, the tree bark and the end of a branch or a twig! If it is an evergreen make a note if the needle rolls easily between two finger and is round, or if when rolled the needle feels square. 

We would be happy to get you acquainted with iNaturalist and how fun it is to use or if you having problems using iNaturalist, just Email friendsafforestation@gmail.com and we can certainly arrange a zoom meeting with you about using iNaturalist!


As events cannot be planned at this time, the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. will have a lot of fun announcing  a variety of winter challenges which will take place periodically over the winter months!

We wish you a lot of fun!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.com
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas
Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

We can learn whatever we need in nature because we are part of nature. Human beings are part of Creation. We live by the same laws as all of nature.

Anne Wilson Schaef

Trust one who has tried it, you will find more in woods than in books; trees and stones will teach you what you can never learn from masters.

Saint Bernard de Clairvaux

Dutch Elm Disease

Why is the ailment afflicting elm trees called “Dutch Elm Disease?”

Well according to BioForest Technologies Inc. “a young phytopathologist from the Netherlands named Bea Schwartz first isolated a fungus from dying elms in 1921, which would give rise to the Dutch elm disease moniker. Another Dutch researcher, Christine Buisman, would also be instrumental in showing the disease was, in fact, caused by this fungus.”

Where disease is a rather broad moniker combining two phrases meaning not at ease, it makes one wonder what is it that is making elm trees not at ease?

There are two small fungus which afflict weakened, and dying elm trees. Ophiostoma ulmi and Ophiostoma novo-ulmi are the latin names for this small sac fungus which afflict the elm trees. However, it is not said and done there. There is a little beetle which thinks that this fungus is so very delicious. The The American Phytopathological Society (APS) mentions that “two beetle species spread the pathogens in North America: the smaller European elm bark beetle (Scolytus multistriatus) and the native elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes).” The beetles fly around searching out an elm tree afflicted with the fungus on which to lay its eggs. The fungus is necessary to the Dutch Elm Beetle survival. Once the afflicted elm tree is found with the sac fungus growing upon it, the beetle lays its eggs. The eggs hatch and the larva crawl around inside the tree under the bark seeking out more of the yummy fungus, and in the process create tunnels damaging the tree further. The trees feel these larva crawling around and send out a chemical attack to stop. By the time the tree is sending out a plethora of chemical agents to mitigate the Dutch Elm Disease the leaves can be seen wilting and turning yellow at the top of the tree as they are not getting the sap they need to survive, exacerbating and quickening the death of the elm tree. The larva eventually mature into adult beetles make it up to a fork in a branch of the tree, and fly away. As the elm bark beetles make there way through the tunnel galleries, the grooves on their back pick up fungal spores. The beetles carry the fungal spores to the next dead and weakened elm tree, and the process starts again. The fungus spreads to neighbouring elms if their root systems touch underground, thereby weakening the entire grove of elms.

Woodpeckers are indeed the tree and forest surgeons. Hinterland Who’s Who written by the Environment and Climate Change Canada & Canadian Wildlife Federation state that Downy woodpeckers “help suppress bark beetle infestations. During the 1950s and 1960s, the Downy Woodpecker in eastern North America fed extensively on the elm bark beetle.”

The other thing which will help our Elm Trees is to keep it healthy. Not raking the elm tree leaves will help the tree with proper nutrients from the detritus and leaf mould, and keeping the elm tree properly watered will reduce additional stresses on it, and a healthy tree will be better able to withstand disease. The sac fungus does not thrive on a healthy Elm Tree.

Another very important aspect for Dutch Elm Disease prevention is to follow proper elm tree cutting, and pruning protocols. The City of Saskatoon and the province of Saskatchewan have great resources for expounding upon the Elm pruning ban April 1 to August 31. All Elm wood must go directly to the land fill following pruning for proper disposal.

It is very important not to help the Dutch Elm Beetle spread the fungal spores. So transporting cut Elm firewood, will mean that a person in a truck will carry the fungal spores greater distances and quicker than the small dutch elm beetle. Elm firewood, being dead elm is a great home for the sac fungus, and therefore is a great incentive to attract the Dutch Elm Beetle.

Richard St. Barbe Baker was not a tree surgeon looking for Dutch Elm Beetles, but rather he was a special kind of forester known as a silviculturist, a doctor of forests. He is responsible for planting billions of trees worldwide through groups he created and his actions. Other people were inspired by Richard St. Barbe Baker and initiated their own tree planting campaigns such as Wangari Maathai who carried on the afforestation project in the Sahara Desert.

Plans to protect air and water, wilderness and wildlife are in fact plans to protect man.”

—Stewart Udall

SaskTip.com

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Twitter: StBarbeBaker Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers ) Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers to the same email. Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps
1./ Learn.
2./ Experience
3./ Do Something: ***
“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.
“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Compost DED Education

The City of Saskatoon is acting on the instances of Dutch Elm Disease found in the city! An informational pamphlet about Dutch Elm Disease DED will be given to those who arrive at the compost depot with elm over the summer 2021 months! The pamphlet will illustrate the dangers to the city urban forest if elm is disposed of incorrectly, and why the guidelines are in place to prevent a pandemic from sweeping through the elms in the city. Where we, as humans, can wear facemasks as protection for the COVID-19 pandemic, the Elm trees are not quite so lucky. The Elm trees rely on humans!

The Elm bark beetle passes through the winter inside the Elm as larva and as an adult. There is no way to protect the Elms against the fungus, though birds and other insects may destroy Elm bark beetles at their various life cycles from egg to larva to beetle. Very low winter temperatures kill many Elm bark beetles. The galleries holding the beetle eggs may be so small with the diseased wood (the food of the larva) that not all eggs may develop into full grown beetles. The best way to control the spread of DED is to remove all trees or parts of trees which may become homes to the Elm Bark Beetle, its eggs and larva. Dutch elm disease (DED) is caused by Ophiostoma ulmi – a member of the sac fungi (Ascomycota) – affecting elm trees, and is spread by elm bark beetles.

The Saskatoon StarPhoenix reported City finds more than 13 tonnes of improperly stored elm wood…Since it confirmed a case of Dutch elm disease in mid-September, the city issued 71 infraction notices, 46 of which contained elm firewood. In light of the Dutch Elm Disease found in the City of Saskatoon and the follow up by the City of Saskatoon staff to discover if any Elm firewood had been stored within city limits, the city is taking action at the drop off compost depots. All persons using the drop off compost depots to recycle their leaf cuttings, pruned branches and logs will still be directed that Elm must be disposed of at the city landfill. Additionally the informational pamphlet will help the Elm that is to be discarded, actually and really is thrown into the city landfill.

A note! Please pay attention to your community association neighbourhood newsletters. They announce when the community association will have a Loraas bin in your neighbourhood in the spring and/or the fall season.

“From April 1 to August 31 every year, it is illegal to prune elm trees in Saskatchewan.” The City of Saskatoon post information each year about when to prune Elm Trees (when the Elm Beetle is the least active). To identify if an Elm may be disease and infected with the fungus, please consult City of Saskatoon Tree Diseases and Pests.

As a citizen scientist there are steps you can take!

  • Do not store Elm firewood, or any Elm cuttings at all
  • Only prune Elm trees between August 31 to March 31
  • Help to identify infected trees The Government of Saskatchewan says that “DED testing is done free of charge for Saskatchewan residents”
  • Learn more about Dutch Elm Disease as it is a fungus which affects the trees. The fungus is carried from Elm tree to Elm tree by three species of Elm Bark Beetles. The fungus is carried from place to place by people transporting cut Elm or storing cut Elm.
  • Share the facebook STOP elm disease in the afforestation areas fund raiser!

Help support this fundraiser to STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic from entering the afforestation areas!

Always dispose of any elm wood at the City Landfill

The fundraiser will go towards vehicle mitigation barriers and park identification signage to STOP illegal motorized trespass and illegal dumping!

Please SHARE this fundraiser, taking care of trees is vitally important in this era of climate change! Protect our elms! LOOK at the George Genereux Clean UP Results!!! Please share the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. [a non profit charity] fundraiser. You can get a charitable receipt By donating to the STOP Dutch Elm Disease fundraiser, you may receive as much as 53% of the amount you donated back at tax-time.

Dutch Elm Disease can be fatal to the elm trees in the afforestation areas. SOS Trees Coalition also deals with Dutch Elm Disease, as they started out under the name of SOS Elms Coalition.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Tonnes of Elm Firewood Arrggh!

Dutch elm disease confirmed in Saskatoon’s Montgomery Place neighbourhood was reported by Global News as well as by CBC news Dutch elm disease found in Saskatoon tree and 650 CKOM Dutch elm disease back in Saskatoon for the first time since 2015 on Sept 15 2020

The fact that Dutch Elm Disease, and the Dutch Elm beetle is so close to the two afforestation areas -George Genereux Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Park- is a cause for concern.

Can you believe that Global News in a follow up report stated that Over 13 tonnes of elm firewood removed from Saskatoon properties

This is in addition to the elm found discarded in the afforestation areas during the community volunteer clean ups. During the afforestation of these urban regional parks as tree nurseries, the City of Saskatoon parks received advice from the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation administration on drought resistant and hardy trees, which included Elm. There is indeed Elm which were planted in 1972 in George Genereux Urban Regional Park and Richard St. Barbe Baker Park. The Dutch Elm Disease beetle could cause havoc in these two amazing afforested areas! Please take care and support our fundraiser!

nfortunately there have been those who are too lazy or too cheap to save the city’s urban forests, and will not pay the landfill fees to dipose of their Elm leaves and branches properly in the landfill.  Something must be done!

Facebook Fundraiser. STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic  from entering the afforestation areas! Help protect this City of Saskatoon Urban Regional Park!

Help support this fundraiser to STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic from entering the afforestation areas!Always dispose of any elm wood at the City Landfill The fundraiser will go towards vehicle mitigation barriers and park identification signage to STOP illegal motorized trespass and illegal dumping! Please SHARE this fundraiser, taking care of trees is vitally important in this era of climate change! Protect our elms! Please share the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. [a non profit charity] fundraiser. You can get a charitable receipt By donating to the STOP Dutch Elm Disease fundraiser, you may receive as much as 53% of the amount you donated back at tax-time.

https://www.facebook.com/donate/246565156761430/

Please be diligent in watching for anyone who may be illegally dumping in George Genereux Urban Regional Park or in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, and advise them of the dangers of dumping in the forest.

Not only is trash unslightly, but Dutch Elm Disease can be fatal to the elm trees in the afforestation areas. SOS Trees Coalition also deals with Dutch Elm Disease, as they started out under the name of SOS Elms Coalition.

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Elm Trees are Beautiful

The Province of Saskatchewan has guidelines for Dutch Elm Disease as does the Government of Canada. Natural Resources Canada has a Dutch Elm Disease fact sheet. Agriculture and Agrifood Canada also has agricultural practices and agroforestry advice. The City of Saskatoon takes Dutch Elm Disease seriously, and for this reason, will not accept Elm at the compost areas in the city. “Also in accordance with the City’s DED Response Plan, inspectors will follow up and search for stored firewood in yards located in Montgomery, Fairhaven, Meadowgreen and the South Industrial area in an effort to pinpoint a source.”

Please be aware that the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area and George Genereux have some magnificent and beautiful elm trees. Please follow guidelines for pruning, and please dispose of any elm leaves and branches in bags for the landfill. Thanks very much

Facebook Fundraiser. STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic  from entering the afforestation areas! Help protect this City of Saskatoon Urban Regional Park!

Help support this fundraiser to STOP Dutch Elm Disease pandemic from entering the afforestation areas! The fundraiser will go towards vehicle mitigation barriers and park identification signage to STOP illegal motorized trespass and illegal dumping! Please SHARE this fundraiser, taking care of trees is vitally important in this era of climate change! Protect our elms! LOOK at the George Genereux Clean UP Results!!! Please share the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. [a non profit charity] fundraiser. You can get a charitable receipt By donating to the STOP Dutch Elm Disease fundraiser, you may receive as much as 53% of the amount you donated back at tax-time.

https://www.facebook.com/donate/246565156761430/

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

NEW P4G District Official Community Plan

DRAFT P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“The future of the planet concerns all of us, and all of us should do what we can to protect it. ” Wangari Maathai.

“The science of forestry arose from the recognition of a universal need. It embodies the spirit of service to mankind in attempting to provide a means of supplying forever a necessity of life and, in addition, ministering to man’s aesthetic tastes and recreational interests. Besides, the spiritual side of human nature needs the refreshing inspiration which comes from trees and woodlands. If a nations saves its trees, the trees will save the nation. And nations as well as tribes may be brought together in this great movement, based on the ideal of beautifying the world by the cultivation of one of God’s loveliest creatures – the tree.” ~ Richard St. Barbe Baker

Study of the Elm

When painting a tree from nature “en plein air,” it is impossible to represent every detail for leaf and twig. So the general mass, as it relieves the sky or distant forest – the larger areas of light and shadow- the stem, the branches or arms as they leave the stem or are seen through foliage, and the roots that grasp the ground – all these can be drawn. Though we will not draw nor paint in water colour every leaf, it is necessary to study closely the shapes of the leaves, to account for their very beauty and elegance, and to gain a knowledge of their varieties in form. The form of the leaf lends itself to the general aspect of the entire tree.

There are also other tree characteristics such as the mode of branching in the trunk, and how trees are different one from another in the general shape of the trunk, and where it takes off to branch. Another distinctive feature is where the masses of foliage are arranged on the respective tree. Each tree has its very own form, profile, expression and character, almost as much so as man and animals.

Painting the Elm. This tree is not so varied in greens as some. Olive Green deepened with a little Indigo will be required to express this general dark-green shade. The first exercise will teach the use of the brush for the whole tree, as well as to show how the sprays are to be treated where they show agains the sky. The brush should be held almost upright, and very full of color, and then worked with a number of independent touches producing a series of curved forms, taking great care to leave out the little interstices of light. In this example, the branches are only faintly indicated, as they are actually eclipsed by the denseness of the foliage. In the second example, several tints of green are worked in besides those u sed in the first one. Touches of deep olive are subsequently applied; in the deepest shadow, and towards the high light, the green almost becomes black. The branches are painted with Vandyke Brown.

The drawing of the Elm foliage is all ruggedness and singularity. The Elm foliage consists of a series of rounded masses in which oval shapes predominate. The touch rendering it in black-lead pencil partakes of that character. Commence with the fan-shaped exercises in the upper right hand corner of the attached example, and practice them. Then work on the next series to the left in the example. The connected zig zag lines shown in the centre of the example need to be practiced to give facility of expressing the shadow in the foliage. The point of the pencil does not need to be pointy sharp for these exercises. The lower shapes in the example shows some of the finished work showing all the practice pieces coming together.

Prairie Forest Virtual App Programming by

Gratitude goes out to

Mel Franciz Andes
Jonah Barrett
Brady Warford
Erik Froc
Jonah Barrett
Jordan Rekunyk
Justin Waselyshen
Mel Franciz Andes
Jeremiah Corda
Riley Chometa
Sarah Radke

Computer Systems Technology students
Saskatchewan Polytechnic under Instructor Wade Lahoda

Interpretation by Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

To submit interpretive stories to the editor Contact friendsafforestation@gmail.com

Support

What is the matter with Elms?

The American Elm (Ulmus americana L.) is doubtless the favourite shade tree ever there was. It is especially valued for its broad and ample shade, its fairly rapid growth, its usual freedom from offensive insects, and its stout resistance to injury by wind storms and sleet; and it is universally admired, also, for its majestic yet graceful form, its picturesque foliage. It is particularly well adapted to the human eye graced with natural beauty as cathedral of giant elms whose lateral branches arch broadly upwards to meet and mingle overhead is one of the noblest products of the afforestation area’s planters art.

I especially regret, therefore, to have to call general attention to a fatal affection of this tree now prevailing over parts of North America, and entering into Saskatchewan as the elm bark beetle pattern tends to follow the riverways. It is the tiny elm bark beetle which carries the spores of the fungus from infected Elm trees across to the Elm tree. Those Elms in a vulnerable state from wounds, infection or other forms of stress are more susceptible to Dutch elm disease. The character, extent, and cause of this destruction are such as to make it plain either that the elm must receive much more intelligent and assiduous care, and treatments than it has heretofore had.

The elm disease, (if such it may be called), caused by the fungus Graphium ulmi is first noticed from early summer to autumn – the leaves, first on the terminal twigs, and later on the larger branches, ceasing their growth, turning brown, and finally falling. This loss is presently followed by the death of the branches themselves, as is shown the following spring when the rest of the tree leaves out. Usually the higher branches are first affected, but the whole top soon seems to blight, and in a year or two the tree is dead. Although there may be no definite sign of insect injury anywhere, it is most commonly the case that a thorough search of the trunk and larger branches will show patches of dead bark under which there are two or more kinds of burrowing insect larvae; or borers.

The truth is that our shade trees have commonly been treated as if, unlike any other crop we raise, they needed neither care nor cultivation, but once set out would take care of themselves forever. That is not true, as we now know. Here especially the elm must be watched and cared for; fed, watered, and protected. This is as good a place as any to enter an emphatic protest against the practice of pruning Elm trees, not only because their natural beauty is forever destroyed by the process, but also because the tree is peculiarly exposed by it to fatal infestation by its most destructive insect enemies. There are guidelines to follow by the trained arborist in tree pruning and care.

The American elm (Ulmus americana L.) is one of our most important shade and ornamental trees. Though the monoculture of human beings are being protected from the Coronavirus COVID 19 with rapidly developed vaccines, Dutch Elm Disease was first noticed in the Netherlands in 1919. No cure is known for a tree affected with the Dutch elm disease. The entire tree affected with Dutch elm disease must be eradicated. While at the present time it is perhaps more probable that the Dutch elm disease may be found in ornamental rather than in forest trees, still the cooperation of foresters, and the general public, in the search for it is earnestly requested. Call City of Saskatoon Urban Biological Services at 306-975-2890. Call the Ministry of Agriculture’s Inquiry Centre at 1-800-567-4224.

Prairie Forest Virtual App Programming by

Gratitude goes out to

Mel Franciz Andes
Jonah Barrett
Brady Warford
Erik Froc
Jonah Barrett
Jordan Rekunyk
Justin Waselyshen
Mel Franciz Andes
Jeremiah Corda
Riley Chometa
Sarah Radke

Computer Systems Technology students
Saskatchewan Polytechnic under Instructor Wade Lahoda

Interpretation; Stephen A. Forbes, Entomologist; Curtis May; Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.

To submit interpretive stories to the editor Contact friendsafforestation@gmail.com

Support