You Will Thank Us – Tips About Cattail Nutrition You Need To Know

There are truly amazing benefits to cattails. They are high in Manganese, Vitamin K, and Magnesium. The roots ground into powder to provide a high protein flour for your favourite recipe.

Manganese supports bone health, reduces blood sugar, aids in the formation of blood clots alongside of Vitamin K, and helps the body form superoxide dismutase, an anti-oxidant enzyme which may indeed reduce inflammation related to inflammatory bowel disease for instance according to Medical News Today.

Healthline reports that magnesium is essential to facilitate the biochemical reactions taking place in your body. These include energy creation, protein formation, prevent depression, gene maintenance, mitigates Type-2 diabetes, aids muscle movements, prevents migraines and aides in the regulation of your nervous system.

There is a very easy way to forage for your cattail roots according to Northern Woodlands is by baking the roots in the oven under a slow oven about 200 degrees Fahrenheit to let them dry overnight. Then place the roots into your coffee grinder or use your mortar and pestle to create a fine high-protein flour. This flour is wonderful to use as a gluten free thickener, or to make pancakes for instance. Just reach down, and remove the connecting rhizome between two cattail plants. The outside layer of the rhizome is spongy, and not great to eat. Just peel your rhizome like a banana peel separating the outer layer with your thumbnails, remove it and you should be left with core.

The Farmer’s almanac says that to “prepare a cattail root, clean it and trim away the smaller branching roots, leaving the large rhizome.” A great means to clean your cattail harvest is to rinse, then soak in vinegar for a few minutes, then rinse again.

There are two choices in using your newly harvested cattail roots.

You can bake the roots in the oven under a slow oven about 200 degrees Fahrenheit to let them dry overnight. Then place the roots into your coffee grinder or use your mortar and pestle to create a fine high-protein flour. This flour is wonderful to use as a gluten free thickener, or to make pancakes for instance.

Markus Rothkranz believes that God wants us all to be healthy and happy and so has given us free foods and medicines all over the planet. As he points out, there will be wild plants we can eat and others that will make us well, growing outside where we live and in our neighbourhoods.

Steve Andrews

Alternatively, you can peel the fibers away, and eat the tender root. Parboil your root, and then grill with a sauce made from your favourite salad dressing!

Send us a comment on how you succeed with your foraging adventure! Stay tuned throughout tourism week for more Cattail recipes for your outdoor foraging foray. Remember to be safe around the water. Try not to forage cattails with puppy dogs in tow during the spring nesting season. Audubon mentions that the Pied-billed Grebe “nests are unusual too – little platforms of plant material that float on water, hidden behind vegetation. …Martin Muller, an expert who loves unravelling the mysteries of Pied-billed Grebes: “Well, there’s the nest…there it is! We didn’t even see it because we were standing on the wrong side of the cattails, so if we step back a little bit…without the bird seeing…us directly staring at it, it’ll carry on.”

Today, during Tourism Week across Canada! We agree with the Tourism Industry Association of Canada (TIAC), that “We encourage all Canadians this #TourismWeek, to take the pledge, and when you are able, plan and travel in Canada this year!“ Why not venture out to the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas, and enjoy Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area or George Genereux Urban Regional park. They are great places to socially distance in 326 acres and 147.8 acres respectively.

Shall I not have intelligence with the earth? Am I not partly leaves and vegetable mold myself.

Henry David Thoreau

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park
For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
For more information:
Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area, George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits
NEW P4G District Official Community Plan
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)?with map
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.comFacebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas

YouTube

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

““Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven..”

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Many more people are becoming interested in foraging and are going out looking for free wild foods. This puts them in touch with nature and with ways of the hunter-gatherer our ancestors were long, long ago.

Steve Andrews

Author: stbarbebaker

This website is about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area - an urban regional park of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The hosts are the stewards of the afforestation area. The afforestation area received its name in honour of the great humanitarian, Richard St. Barbe Baker. Richard St. Barbe Baker (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) was an English forester, environmental activist and author, who contributed greatly to worldwide reforestation efforts. As a leader, he founded an organization, Men of the Trees, still active today, whose many chapters carry out reforestation internationally. {Wikipedia} Email is StBarbeBaker AT yahoo.com to reach the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

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