Open to the outdoors

Saskatoon Morning with Leisha Grebinski – March 22, 2021: Open to the Outdoors: Julia Adamson

There was an excellent opportunity for the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. to meet with Leisha and her amazing team at the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area.

If you would like to hear the radio show, it is online

“During the lockdown those that can, have been flocking into green spaces and urban forests for physical exercise and mental calming.  ..

Isolation and prevention measures are putting the critical importance to society of urban green spaces in a completely new light, intensifying existing dynamics and creating new ones. ” (From stories on trees: urban forests and green space during COVID-19 pandemic)

Forests and greenspaces are amazing places to destress from COVID protocols in a low risk activity. However, when you walk, cycle, snowshoe on the trails, remember they are dirt trails, and not urban city asphalt trails. Walking around puddles and off the trails, may mean you are squishing species at risk. Getting a large urban footprint on trails when they are mud-puddly means that the trails are much harder to use when the wet spring season has passed, and people want to enjoy trails when it is dry again. The Fatlanders Fat Bike Brigade volunteers put many hours of grooming into the trails over the long winter months. So, long story short, no matter how you are persuing active transportation in any of the city parks, be aware of the ground and if it is soaking wet and how we can all do our part to take care of the forest and the trails now that spring is around the corner.

“Even when trails are mostly dry, and ok to ride [walk or jog], there can still be lingering puddles and muddy sections. If it’s not a bad enough puddle that it will cause lasting trail damage and you are going to ride [walk] through, make sure you ride [walk] through the middle of the puddle. Going around puddles widens trails, and will only make puddles worse.”(Source)

YouTubePlaylist
Pinterest richardstbarbeb
Blogger: FriendsAfforestation
Tumblr friendsafforestation.tumblr.com
Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park
Facebook: StBarbeBaker Afforestation Area
Facebook for the non profit Charity Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. FriendsAreas
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Reddit: FriendsAfforestation
Twitter: St Barbe Baker Charity Twitter:FriendsAreas
Mix: friendsareas
Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers )Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year). Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers Please and thank you! Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated. Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date! Canada Helps

United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

Be like a tree in pursuit of your cause. Stand firm, grip hard, thrust upward. Bend to the winds of heaven. And learn tranquility.”

— Richard St. Barbe Baker

Planting and growing increasing quantities of trees is the scientific solution to Earth’s environmental dilemna

Richard St. Barbe Baker

Author: stbarbebaker

This website is about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area - an urban regional park of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The hosts are the stewards of the afforestation area. The afforestation area received its name in honour of the great humanitarian, Richard St. Barbe Baker. Richard St. Barbe Baker (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) was an English forester, environmental activist and author, who contributed greatly to worldwide reforestation efforts. As a leader, he founded an organization, Men of the Trees, still active today, whose many chapters carry out reforestation internationally. {Wikipedia} Email is StBarbeBaker AT yahoo.com to reach the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: