All of us share the environment

All is Ours Day April 8

From the nēhiyawak – Cree people the word, Wahkohtowin  means “everything is related.”  Wahkohtowin connotes interconnectedness, so circles are used as symbols to represent the way in which every element of a system is part of the whole.  Today as you celebrate All is Ours Day, consider the spirit of Wahkohtowin which denotes the interconnected nature of relationships, communities, and natural systems.

“Even if you never have the chance to see or touch the ocean, the ocean touches you with every breath you take, every drop of water you drink, every bite you consume. Everyone, everywhere is inextricably connected to and utterly dependent upon the existence of the sea.” — Sylvia Earle

“All things share the same breath — the beast, the tree, the man. The air shares its spirit with all the life it supports.” — Chief Seattle

“The COVID-19 threat has shown that governments can act swiftly and resolutely in a crisis, and that people are ready to change their behavior for the good of humanity. The world must now urgently adopt the same approach to the existential challenge of climate change” reports Mary Robinson and Daya Reddy.

On Wednesday April 8, there are two weeks before the Earth Day celebration! This year’s Earth Day 2020 theme is Climate Action, which will be explored during Earth Month. Today why not start an energy diary. When and where did you use energy? Don’t forget the hidden energy forms you use without thinking about it. Did you talk on the phone? Watch T.V.? Play a video game? Sit in a heated house? Eat food from a fridge or freezer? Did you need to use any lighting? Warm up food on a stove, or in an oven? Did you dress in clothing washed in a washing machine and dried in a dryer? What about a computer, how much screen time did you use? What about hot water – perhaps you needed a hot shower when you awoke? Did you use carbon fuels like gas, natural gas, or oil? Did you use electricity? Does your city electrical power plant burn coal to produce electricity? Is your residence fitted for solar or wind electrical power generation? Are you a climate activist? Have you turned to renewable sources of energy if you or your family own a home? Have you phoned or emailed your landlord about renewable sources of energy on the place you rent?

The COVID-19 protocols have indeed improved air pollution as the world population stays home, and the economy slows down.  This shows, that the collective action taken can make a difference!

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Canada Helps

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SW 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Instagram: St.BarbeBaker

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

You Tube Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

You Tube George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Please help protect / enhance /commemorate your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail / e-transfers)

Canada Helps

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

“We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” — Native American Proverb

“The environment is where we all meet; where all of us have a mutual interest; it is the one thing all of us share.” — Lady Bird Johnson

Author: stbarbebaker

This website is about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area - an urban regional park of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The hosts are the stewards of the afforestation area. The afforestation area received its name in honour of the great humanitarian, Richard St. Barbe Baker. Richard St. Barbe Baker (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) was an English forester, environmental activist and author, who contributed greatly to worldwide reforestation efforts. As a leader, he founded an organization, Men of the Trees, still active today, whose many chapters carry out reforestation internationally. {Wikipedia} Email is StBarbeBaker AT yahoo.com to reach the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

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