Are Off Leash Recreation Areas a Good Idea for Service Dogs?

Today, just a couple of provincial news stories about off leash recreation areas.

Regina residents unhappy with accessibility of off-leash dog parks “As far wheelchair accessibility it’s useless.” Jennifer Ackerman, Regina Leader-Post Updated: August 17, 2018

Could Regina’s dog parks be more accessible? Regina Leader-Post Updated: August 17, 2018

“Dogs do speak, but only to those who know how to listen.”– Orhan Pamuk

Can your service dog enjoy the water in the summer months?

Are Off Leash Recreation Areas a Good Idea for Service Dogs?

Where do Service Dogs and their owners go in Saskatoon for recreation?

Where to Service Dogs, and their owners go for recreation in other cities around the world?

Do Service Dogs have exercise needs met by their owners, or are the owner dependent on a support system to walk their dogs to meet the dogs needs?

If a person is physically challenged with a walker or wheelchair, and own a pet or Service Dog, can they walk their own dog?

Should a physically challenged person be able to have independence and walk their own dog, or should they have a support system to help care for their pet?

What are your comments?

Where would one walk in Saskatoon with a Service Dog?

How do other cities compare?

For directions as to how to drive to “George Genereux” Urban Regional Park

For directions on how to drive to Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

For more information:

Blairmore Sector Plan Report; planning for the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area,  George Genereux Urban Regional Park and West Swale and areas around them inside of Saskatoon city limits

P4G Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth The P4G consists of the Cities of Saskatoon, Warman, and Martensville, the Town of Osler and the Rural Municipality of Corman Park; planning for areas around the afforestation area and West Swale outside of Saskatoon city limits

Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Where is the George Genereux Urban Regional Park (Afforestation Area)? with map

Pinterest richardstbarbeb

Facebook Group Page: Users of the George Genereux Urban Regional Park

Facebook: StBarbeBaker

Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

Facebook: South West OLRA

Twitter: StBarbeBaker

Please help protect / enhance your afforestation areas, please contact the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc. (e-mail)

Support the afforestation areas with your donation or membership ($20.00/year).  Please donate by paypal using the e-mail friendsafforestation AT gmail.com, or by using e-transfers  Please and thank you!  Your donation and membership is greatly appreciated.  Members e-mail your contact information to be kept up to date!

QR Code FOR PAYPAL DONATIONS to the Friends of the Saskatoon Afforestation Areas Inc.
Paypal
Payment Options
Membership : $20.00 CAD – yearly
Membership with donation : $20.00 CAD -monthly
Membership with donation : $50.00 CAD
Membership with donation : $100.00 CAD

1./ Learn.

2./ Experience

3./ Do Something: ***

What was Richard St. Barbe Baker’s mission, that he imparted to the Watu Wa Miti, the very first forest scouts or forest guides?  To protect the native forest, plant ten native trees each year, and take care of trees everywhere.

“We stand in awe and wonder at the beauty of a single tree. Tall and graceful it stands, yet robust and sinewy with spreading arms decked with foliage that changes through the seasons, hour by hour, moment by moment as shadows pass or sunshine dapples the leaves. How much more deeply are we moved as we begin to appreciate the combined operations of the assembly of trees we call a forest.”~Richard St. Barbe Baker

 

Author: stbarbebaker

This website is about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area - an urban regional park of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The hosts are the stewards of the afforestation area. The afforestation area received its name in honour of the great humanitarian, Richard St. Barbe Baker. Richard St. Barbe Baker (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) was an English forester, environmental activist and author, who contributed greatly to worldwide reforestation efforts. As a leader, he founded an organization, Men of the Trees, still active today, whose many chapters carry out reforestation internationally. {Wikipedia} Email is StBarbeBaker AT yahoo.com to reach the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

3 thoughts on “Are Off Leash Recreation Areas a Good Idea for Service Dogs?”

  1. Kind of off topic, and not very helpful to you, but I had to worry about this after my hip replacement this past spring/summer. Who was going to walk my two (large) dogs while I was absolutely not able to walk them safely? I had never thought before of how this would be a problem for a marginally mobile person with a service dog. Now I think about it. I have no idea what people do, especially people like me with no spouse or family. I’m fine now and can walk my dogs (Yay!) but not everyone is so lucky and maybe I will not always be. Good post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is true. It is truly a challenge. I often think of a young lady who is blind at church, and her seeing eye dog. Are they able to go out and let the pooch have a momentary time off from his duties? Good to hear you are round and about again. It certainly would be quite the change in the usual lifestyle for a spell indeed.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I am loving walking without having to think about it, taking real strides and moving along briskly. I know I’m lucky. My dad had MS and back in the 1960s there were no accomodations for handicapped people. It was very challenging for him to do anything.

        Like

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