Do One Thing

We no longer destroy great works of art. They are treasured, and regarded as of priceless value; but we have yet to attain the state of civilization where the destruction of a glorious work of Nature, whether it be a cliff, a forest, or a species of mammal or bird, is regarded with equal abhorrence

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World Wildlife Day
3 March 2018

“The preservation of animal and plant life, and of the general beauty of Nature, is one of the foremost duties of the men and women of to-day. It is an imperative duty, because it must be performed at once, for otherwise it will be too late. Every possible means of preservation,—sentimental, educational and legislative,—must be employed.” William T. Hornaday Director New York Zoological Park,  Author American Natural History President American Bison Authority.

What is the one thing that you could do for wildlife today?

“I know of no way of judging the future, but by the past.” Patrick Henry

“We no longer destroy great works of art. They are treasured, and regarded as of priceless value; but we have yet to attain the state of civilization where the destruction of a glorious work of Nature, whether it be a cliff, a forest, or a species of mammal or bird, is regarded with equal abhorrence”~William T. Hornaday

What are some things you could do for wildlife today?

  • Parents take your children out to explore, and be creative in nature.  Learn the name of a new flower.
  • Teachers grow gardens, and plant trees with classes of children, and conduct field trips to the zoo to learn “It is your Duty to protect all harmless wild things, and you must do it” ~Hornaday.
  • Science subjects embrace local nature, students learning the study of nature, the name of the flora and fauna in their neighbourhood.
  • Art classes seek to draw from nature, learning the botanical structure of plants, seeds, flowers and leaves.
  • Local and family celebration of World Wildlife Day, World Migratory Bird Day with hands on nature activities to protect wildlife and birds.
  • Provincial and national efforts to observe Arbor Day, Earth Day, and other special days with events and celebrations.
  • Boys and girls clubs, scouts, girl guides, brownies, and youth groups celebrate tree planting ceremonies, and nature watch activities.
  • A trip to the zoo, the park, the afforestation area to devote time for the observation and preservation of flora and fauna.
  • Clean up your local environment, your school yard, street, or park.
  • Do you know the local animals and plants on the endangered species list, and what they look like?  Do you know which plants are necessary to which animal?
  • Have you planted a pollinater’s garden or a native flower garden bed?
  • What can you think of?  Can you add more to the list?

The fate of wildlife, hangs today by a very delicate thread.

“Will the millions of men commanded by General Apathy now arouse, before it is too late to act?

Will the true sportsmen rise up, and do their duty, bravely and unselfishly?

Will the people with wealth to give away do their duty toward wild life and humanity, fairly and generously?

Will the zoologists awake, leave their tables in their stone palaces of peace, and come out to the firing-line?

Will the lawmakers heed the handwriting on the wall, and make laws that represent the full discharge of their duty toward wild life and humanity?

Will the editors beat the alarm-gong, early and late, in season and out of season, until the people awake?

On the answers to these questions hang the fate of the wild creatures of the world,—their preservation or their extermination.~ Hornaday”

“People take the longest possible paths, digress to numerous dead ends, and make all kinds of mistakes. Then historians come along and write summaries of this messy, nonlinear process and make it appear like a simple, straight line.”  Dean Kamen

For more information:
Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area is located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada north of Cedar Villa Road, within city limits, in the furthest south west area of the city. 52° 06′ 106° 45′
Addresses:
Part SE 23-36-6 – Afforestation Area – 241 Township Road 362-A
Part SE 23-36-6 – SW Off-Leash Recreation Area (Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area ) – 355 Township Road 362-A
S ½ 22-36-6 Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area (West of SW OLRA) – 467 Township Road 362-A
NE 21-36-6 “George Genereux” Afforestation Area – 133 Range Road 3063
Wikimapia Map: type in Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Google Maps South West Off Leash area location pin at parking lot
Web page: https://stbarbebaker.wordpress.com
Where is the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area? with map
Facebook: StBarbeBaker
Facebook group page : Users of the St Barbe Baker Afforestation Area
Facebook: South West OLRA
Contact the Meewasin Valley Authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The MVA has begun a Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund. If you wish to support the afforestation area with your donation, write a cheque to the “Meewasin Valley Authority Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area trust fund (MVA RSBBAA trust fund)”. Please and thank you!
Twitter: StBarbeBaker
Please contemplate joining the SOS Elms coalition or make a donation to SOS Elms ~ leave a message to support the afforestation area  😉

“Nothing is perfect. Life is messy. Relationships are complex. Outcomes are uncertain.”   Hugh Mackay

 

Author: stbarbebaker

This website is about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area - an urban regional park of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The hosts are the stewards of the afforestation area. The afforestation area received its name in honour of the great humanitarian, Richard St. Barbe Baker. Richard St. Barbe Baker (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) was an English forester, environmental activist and author, who contributed greatly to worldwide reforestation efforts. As a leader, he founded an organization, Men of the Trees, still active today, whose many chapters carry out reforestation internationally. {Wikipedia} Email is StBarbeBaker AT yahoo.com to reach the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

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