Dutch Elm Disease

If you defoliate a large elm and put the leaves together edge to edge, they would cover ten acres. So naturally, the first tree to suffer from air pollution was the elm and, of course, when an elm is suffering from fatigue it is subject to attack by disease: the elm bark beetle, the carrier of the elm fungus, comes along and the tree succumbs.

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What do you know about Dutch Elm Disease?

Elms are under risk of Dutch Elm Disease. In 1972 both Siberian Elm Ulmus pumila and American Elm Ulmus americana, were two species of tree “afforested.” To protect the afforestation area, it is vital not to bring Elm cut wood, leaves, or Elm compost into the afforestation area.

To find out more about Dutch Elm Disease there is great information at SOS Elms Coalition, a grassroot organisation formed to care for the health of Saskatchewan’s community tree populations, in particular the threat of Dutch Elm Disease.”

To learn about active projects SOS Elms is engaging upon on visit Facebook SOS Elms

Sara Williams, Saskatoon horticulturist, writes about the new SOS Elms Saskatoon Tree Tour booklet

The City of Saskatoon also provides invaluable information about Elm and at Tree pests and diseases.

The MVA and SOS Elms also work together in management of Elms around Saskatoon. “Thanks to the MVA, the elms and other mature trees between the Gathercole land and the river have received quality treatment, including some high-tech structures to protect tree roots from the grading and bank reinforcement work. ”

Any Elm brought into the Afforestation area must follow the protocols set by the City of Saskatoon, the MVA and SOS Elms. Elm from locations outside the Afforestation area must not be allowed to enter. Please help to keep vigilant, and protect the forest.

In this country, what percentage of the land area do you think should be re-afforested?

The minimum for safety is one third of the total land area. I think what is happening to the elms must be alerting the whole country to the necessity of trees, of the need for more trees. The elm has the largest leaf surface of any tree in Britain. If you defoliate a large elm and put the leaves together edge to edge, they would cover ten acres. So naturally, the first tree to suffer from air pollution was the elm and, of course, when an elm is suffering from fatigue it is subject to attack by disease: the elm bark beetle, the carrier of the elm fungus, comes along and the tree succumbs.

I look at it this way. If a person is living a normal life and not abusing themselves – not smoking too much, not eating too much, not drinking too much – but living normally and eating the right food – they will be fit and well. It is only when they start abusing themselves that they are prone to attack by disease. It is the same with trees.

The next tree to go (the next tree with the largest leaf surface after the elm) is probably the beech: after that the sycamore: and so on. Finally it will be Man’s turn. We forget that we owe our existence to the presence of trees and as far as forest cover goes, we have never been in such a vulnerable position as we are today. The only answer is to plant more trees – to plant for our lives. ~Richard St. Barbe Baker Quotation

Richard St. Barbe Baker answers the first question above

Author: stbarbebaker

This website is about the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area - an urban regional park of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The hosts are the stewards of the afforestation area. The afforestation area received its name in honour of the great humanitarian, Richard St. Barbe Baker. Richard St. Barbe Baker (9 October 1889 – 9 June 1982) was an English forester, environmental activist and author, who contributed greatly to worldwide reforestation efforts. As a leader, he founded an organization, Men of the Trees, still active today, whose many chapters carry out reforestation internationally. {Wikipedia} Email is StBarbeBaker AT yahoo.com to reach the Stewards of the Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area

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